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Passing along an old, old, Trick;

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  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Passing along an old, old, Trick;
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Thursday, March 11, 2021 10:01 AM

Hi Ya'll;

        I was taking  a Coffee and Tobacco break and was musing about the state of Modeling in the world in general. Then I remembered something I do, as a normal thing when building my plastic models. It doesn't matter what it is either! even my Train stuff!

        When you open that Plane, Ship, Car, Tank, or whatever, no matter how well it's been molded, you have stuff that the company saw fit to mold in place. If they didn't, then the parts count would be higher because of the " Fiddly Bits". I won't go into a lot of detail here. Suffice it to say, everyone that has built a plastic model has run into this.

       The molded on parts will be sharp on say a Trumpeter, Hasegawa or Tamiya kit. The problem is still there. Even on a Meng kit it is there. What? Well, if you could cut a cross section of an area, say where a Set of tools is molded on a Tank deck. 

      In that cross section you would see, even though there seems to be a sharp delineation between the part and the deck, don't be fooled. To accomodate the molding process and allow a clean " Pop-Out" of the part when the mold release pins push on the plastic so it will come out cleanly. There is an almost, ( On the better models anyway) Infinitesimal radius! Yes, a radius!

      Don't be cutting something apart to prove me wrong, Either. In the following scales it can be a problem 1/192 and below all the way down to 1/1250! So how do you handle this common ailment? Years ago, when I did my Second box scale REVELL ship I tried this. I took the number 11 blade and very carefully shaved the radius away from the connection between the detail and the deck.

      Then I took the same blade and Carefully now, cut a thin line between the part and the deck. Just the weight of the knife was enough. It didn't leave a noticeable edge! Then when I painted like say, the Deck on the "Hawaiian Pilot" Freighter, the deck paint didn't crawl up the side of the detail. And the same held true when I painted the detail!

      Then where the detail was Unpainted surfaces I just let the blade glide in that groove to get offending blurbs of paint off for a nice straight line. I imagine many of you have thought of this. It seems to be something I am sure many thought of, but how many still do it! Search your Memories, It's amazing how many old tricks we learned are still great tools for making a better model today. Have a nice day !

  • Member since
    February 2021
  • From: Silverton,Oregon,USA
Posted by TheModeler on Thursday, March 11, 2021 11:23 PM

OK,sorry if this sounds kinda annoyying or useless,but it was kind of confusing.Maybe a picture or 2 will do it?

Thanks,

Max

 

Thanks,TheModeler(Novice Mode{Just for nowWink})

ON THE BENCH(My first ones):

-1:25 AMT/Round2 1969 Yenko Camaro(40% done)

-1:72 Atlantis Models Bell UH-1B Gunship Helicopter (20% done)

In the stash:

-1963 AMT 1/32 Corvette Stingray

-Tamiya Mitsubishi A6M3 "Hamp" Zero,1/76

-Atlantis Models BELL Firefighter "Old Smokey",1/76

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, March 12, 2021 7:43 AM

Rather than modifying the pin, I always drill the holes a little deeper with a pinvise and appropriate drill bit.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Friday, March 12, 2021 2:05 PM

Max;

      Sorry to confuse you. Do you have a ship model handy? Now, look where the molded parts join the deck. See the radius? You should be able to see it in good light. This is the radius I was talking about. In a model car with a molded on frame it is Very noticeable between the frame and the floor, Especially!  if the Exhaust is molded on too. It is very obvious in this case!

 Sorry about no pictures.I was just getting the hang of it when the Camera I had been given went south!

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Friday, March 12, 2021 2:07 PM

Don;

 What are you referring to? The only Pins I mentioned were the Ejection pins on the Mold.

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, March 12, 2021 6:42 PM

Remember the old "Love Bug" Monogram M48?

The grab rails that ran around the outside of the turret were molded as big funky looking shelves!

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Saturday, March 13, 2021 8:16 AM

Oho,Bill!

 You bet, that was a molding excercise in futility, for sure!

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, March 13, 2021 8:31 AM

Tanker-Builder

Don;

 What are you referring to? The only Pins I mentioned were the Ejection pins on the Mold.

 

Then I , too, am confused.  Indeed a picture or diagram would help.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, March 13, 2021 9:49 AM

Don Stauffer

 

 
Tanker-Builder

Don;

 What are you referring to? The only Pins I mentioned were the Ejection pins on the Mold.

 

 

 

Then I , too, am confused.  Indeed a picture or diagram would help.

 

 

I think what he is talking about is molded-on deck detail.

As molded-on, raised detail needs a "draft", and the tip makes them look more separated.

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    February 2021
  • From: Silverton,Oregon,USA
Posted by TheModeler on Saturday, March 13, 2021 10:16 AM

GMorrison

 

 
Don Stauffer

 

 
Tanker-Builder

Don;

 What are you referring to? The only Pins I mentioned were the Ejection pins on the Mold.

 

 

 

Then I , too, am confused.  Indeed a picture or diagram would help.

 

 

 

 

I think what he is talking about is molded-on deck detail.

 

As molded-on, raised detail needs a "draft", and the tip makes them look more separated.

Bill

 

Oh,OK.I think I get it now.Thanks Bill!

Thanks,TheModeler(Novice Mode{Just for nowWink})

ON THE BENCH(My first ones):

-1:25 AMT/Round2 1969 Yenko Camaro(40% done)

-1:72 Atlantis Models Bell UH-1B Gunship Helicopter (20% done)

In the stash:

-1963 AMT 1/32 Corvette Stingray

-Tamiya Mitsubishi A6M3 "Hamp" Zero,1/76

-Atlantis Models BELL Firefighter "Old Smokey",1/76

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Saturday, March 13, 2021 10:22 AM

That's how I understood it, too! Might be worth a try from time to time...

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    January 2021
Posted by JoeSMG on Saturday, March 13, 2021 10:45 AM

Great tip,

Thanks TB. Slightly embarrassed to say, doing this never occurred to me. I can also incorporate the technique effortlessly into my 3D printed designs as they can have a similar problem. Happy to try anything that makes painting the transition from deck to superstructure easier. Normally the dance is: Paint the deck, paint the walls, touch up the deck, touch up the walls and repeat until good enough.

- Joe the SMG

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Saturday, March 13, 2021 2:20 PM

Yeah Joe;

   I forgot myself on a couple and that's what happened. White Bulkheads on the ship( Revells-Finjett) and different deck colors and I didn't do it. OOOPS!

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Saturday, March 13, 2021 2:23 PM

Thank You Bill!

 How do you draw stuff like that? If I could have done that it would've been easy to understand. I can do all kinds of words ( We all know that!) but I haven't the slightest idea how to put a drawing on here.

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, March 13, 2021 2:35 PM

I graduated achitecture school 43 years ago and it's what I do.

I just recently decided to go back to work at a senior position in a firm. 

AFA posting it, scan your sketch as a jpg and then treat it just like you would a photo.

" And that's what 50 years of architecture buys me?".

 

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, March 14, 2021 9:04 AM

TB- I finally realized what you were getting at.  You meant the radius at the bottom of the wall cross-sections!  If there is no sheer or camber in the bottom of the casting, I rub the deckhouse on a piece of sandpaper.  But if there is any sheer or camber, I do level the bottoms with a knife just as you do, using the knife blade as a scraper.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Sunday, March 14, 2021 9:14 AM

Well, Bill;

    Congratulations-Maybe? What will you be doing, if I might ask? There isn't much  for me as the Marine firms don't want old dogs on board. We don't think in Littoral Combat Shipeez!

 I like Deepwater machines. Sheer brute Ships. We don't build them here. I don't think. Something about Unions and Costs.

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Sunday, March 14, 2021 9:16 AM

Yeah!

   You see Don. Most folks don't know about that little radius between molded on Deckhouses and the Deck.

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Sunday, March 14, 2021 12:54 PM

FWIW, I got what you meant reading your O.P.

This situation you describe is all too familiar to me, and I hate painting raised details because I suck at painting them.

You tip make sense to me, and by golly I'm going to try it if I can remember.

Thanks, TB.

-Greg

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, March 14, 2021 3:23 PM

Tanker-Builder
Well, Bill;     Congratulations-Maybe? What will you be doing, if I might ask?

i practiced architecture for 15 years, then worked as a General Contactor for 5 years, and spent the last 25 years managing a graphic design business.

That business is going through a managed retirement, so I am back designing buildings.

My current project is a high school football stadium.

Go Trailblazers! 

Your tip is a very good one. I will try it. Maybe with a steady hand with the cut, it might be possible to paint by hand with no masking.

 

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    July 2019
  • From: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posted by Bobstamp on Sunday, March 14, 2021 3:58 PM

Well, that's just genius! Why didn't I think of that? Because, I guess, I'm not a genius! I just about went crazy painting the deck and the "deck furniture" of the U.S.S. Repose hospital ship I'm building.

Bob

On the bench: 1/500 Revell S.S. Hope, being built as the hospital ship U.S.S. Repose; Academy 1/72 F-86F Sabre, and a diorama to illustrate the crash of a Beech T-34B Mentor which I survived in 1962 (I'm using Minicraft's 1/48 model of the Mentor). 

  • Member since
    February 2021
  • From: Silverton,Oregon,USA
Posted by TheModeler on Monday, March 15, 2021 6:36 PM

Tanker-Builder

Max;

      Sorry to confuse you. Do you have a ship model handy? Now, look where the molded parts join the deck. See the radius? You should be able to see it in good light. This is the radius I was talking about. In a model car with a molded on frame it is Very noticeable between the frame and the floor, Especially!  if the Exhaust is molded on too. It is very obvious in this case!

 Sorry about no pictures.I was just getting the hang of it when the Camera I had been given went south!

 

Oh,that really explains it.Thanks!

Thanks,TheModeler(Novice Mode{Just for nowWink})

ON THE BENCH(My first ones):

-1:25 AMT/Round2 1969 Yenko Camaro(40% done)

-1:72 Atlantis Models Bell UH-1B Gunship Helicopter (20% done)

In the stash:

-1963 AMT 1/32 Corvette Stingray

-Tamiya Mitsubishi A6M3 "Hamp" Zero,1/76

-Atlantis Models BELL Firefighter "Old Smokey",1/76

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 9:03 AM

Hey Bill:

    My Model Building Studio was on the other side of a wall shared with an Architectural/Engineering firm. I built many of their models when they were crunched for time. I didn't mind working late. Also the wilder the design the happier I was to do it.

   I also contracted to at least four personal Injury Lawyers as well. That was Before those crazy ads and shenanigans were allowed in adverts. My four worked by Word of Mouth. They kept me pretty busy as well.

    It's only when Mother Nature didn't like my town that I went back in the field. I couldn't and still can't being cooped up inside even with floor to ceiling windows. In My case you couldn't even tell where the building had been!

    I personally had to teach four of my team how to build a model even. That is one of the tricks I taught them! Never in my wildest dreams did I think building Models would make me more money that Building Bridges and Hospitals!

   When I did the L.R. V.A. Project, I was one of four,  and I netted less than my studio did that year. Well, T.V. and Lawyers, and Architects and Engineers were always looking to get someone to do it. I guess some just didn't like it.

    I cannot forget the better known Movie studios in Northern Cal. who contracted with me from time to time. Talk about another world and way of thinking!

  • Member since
    June 2017
Posted by UnwaryPaladin on Wednesday, June 2, 2021 5:56 AM

Good tip! Now I just have to remember to do it on the next opportunity!

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