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Best Spray Primer(Tamiya)

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  • Member since
    February 2021
  • From: Silverton,Oregon,USA
Best Spray Primer(Tamiya)
Posted by TheModeler on Thursday, March 11, 2021 10:14 PM

I was looking at the 5 different variants of Tamiya primers,which were Fine Oxide Red(which apparently is for chipping/weathering),Fine Light Grey,Fine White,Grey,and Grey mini.Any suggestions on which one to get?

Thanks,

Max

Thanks,TheModeler(Novice Mode{Just for nowWink})

ON THE BENCH(My first ones):

-1:25 AMT/Round2 1969 Yenko Camaro(40% done)

-1:72 Atlantis Models Bell UH-1B Gunship Helicopter (20% done)

In the stash:

-1963 AMT 1/32 Corvette Stingray

-Tamiya Mitsubishi A6M3 "Hamp" Zero,1/76

-Atlantis Models BELL Firefighter "Old Smokey",1/76

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, March 12, 2021 7:47 AM

I use the fine on small scale models.  However, it is not that good on photoetch, which requires a metal primer.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Friday, March 12, 2021 8:05 AM

I use the standard grey Tamiya primer, but I decant mine and airbrush it.  Never used the fine, but if you're rattle-canning your primer, that's probably going to be best to avoid burying fine details.  

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    February 2021
  • From: Silverton,Oregon,USA
Posted by TheModeler on Friday, March 12, 2021 10:02 AM

Don Stauffer

I use the fine on small scale models.  However, it is not that good on photoetch, which requires a metal primer.

 

I don't really use photoetch,other than when I'm doing metal earth models,which is not common.

Thanks,TheModeler(Novice Mode{Just for nowWink})

ON THE BENCH(My first ones):

-1:25 AMT/Round2 1969 Yenko Camaro(40% done)

-1:72 Atlantis Models Bell UH-1B Gunship Helicopter (20% done)

In the stash:

-1963 AMT 1/32 Corvette Stingray

-Tamiya Mitsubishi A6M3 "Hamp" Zero,1/76

-Atlantis Models BELL Firefighter "Old Smokey",1/76

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Friday, March 12, 2021 10:30 AM

I mostly use the Fine Gray for basic base coat and sanding

I like to use the white if I'm painting white over it

And the red oxide works great for German armor,not just chipping but for shadiing,sharing, the inside of fenders,or roadwheels

I have used all of it on PE screens,small bits and fenders,shurzen with no problems

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Friday, March 12, 2021 11:25 AM

I use Tamiya's gray and white, too.  The gray is my regular primer for plastic, resin, or metal.  I use the white as Tojo describes, as a primer for white finish colors, or other light colors.  Though, I will also undercoat with white, after priming, for things like yellow or red markings on an airplane.

I have not used Tamiya's red oxide, but I have used a rust-colored primer for the same purpose, as a base for weathering technique.

Regarding using Tamiya primer on photo-etch, though, I have used it but found it prone to chipping or flaking.  I second Don's advice to use a primer for metal in that case.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Friday, March 12, 2021 5:04 PM

the Baron
Regarding using Tamiya primer on photo-etch, though, I have used it but found it prone to chipping or flaking.  I second Don's advice to use a primer for metal in that case.

I've had chipping and flaking as well with Tamiya primer on photo-etch.  Started using Gunze Mr. Metal Primer, followed by Tamiya grey primer, and then paint.  No more chipping and flaking.  Definitely have to be careful with the stuff and make sure it doesn't touch your skin when its wet.  The stuff even smells like it would burn a hole in you.  Aside from that, its a great primer for metal parts.  Propeller

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    February 2021
Posted by ScaleModeler_1973 on Friday, March 12, 2021 6:56 PM

Hello folks. Thus far, I have only airbrushed Vallejo primer (I actually kind of regret buying several bottles of the stuff, because of some of the problems posters have shared with using it), but I bought a can of Tamiya grey primer to try for the first time. My question: is the main benefit of Tamiya primer that it doesn't pull up when you try to mask camouflage patterns over it? Is there still a good reason for me to use Tamiya if I am only going to paint single color schemes like olive drab on my 1/35 Sherman or panzer grey for a Stug III?  Just wondering. Also, any special tips for using Tamiya primer (in the spray can)? (I think I am supposed to use several light quick passes, and not try to build up the coat all at once, correct?).

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Friday, March 12, 2021 7:20 PM

The main benefit of Tamiya and most primers is to prepare the bare plastic surface of your models to accept paint.  It gives the paint something to hold onto.  Tamiya primer is lacquer-based, so it actually has etching properties that give it a really good grip on the plastic.  Can't give solid advice on how to rattle-can it, but lots of other guys here do it that way, so they'll have good tips.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    December 2020
Posted by TheDemiGod on Friday, March 12, 2021 10:40 PM

Primer is primer so what's the difference which brand you use. Everyone has their own recommendations. I use Rustoleum brand from a rattle can and never had issues with it. Why? Because it's cheap, doesn't chip, hardens well, sprays nice, and lasts longer.

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Monday, March 15, 2021 1:06 PM

Eaglecash867
 
the Baron
Regarding using Tamiya primer on photo-etch, though, I have used it but found it prone to chipping or flaking.  I second Don's advice to use a primer for metal in that case. 

I've had chipping and flaking as well with Tamiya primer on photo-etch.  Started using Gunze Mr. Metal Primer, followed by Tamiya grey primer, and then paint.  No more chipping and flaking.  Definitely have to be careful with the stuff and make sure it doesn't touch your skin when its wet.  The stuff even smells like it would burn a hole in you.  Aside from that, its a great primer for metal parts.  Propeller

 
I wonder if Tamiya is prone to chipping on photo-etch, primarily because of the nature of the material.  Not that it's brass, but that it's in tiny flexible pieces.
 
I pose the question, because I use Tamiya's primer on metal figures and it works very well in that application.  But such pieces are less prone to flexing, would helps lift the paint away, and the surfaces are probably already rougher than the surface of a piece of photo-etch, so the primer can "grip" or "bite" into the surface more effectively.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Monday, March 15, 2021 1:46 PM

the Baron
I wonder if Tamiya is prone to chipping on photo-etch, primarily because of the nature of the material.  Not that it's brass, but that it's in tiny flexible pieces.   I pose the question, because I use Tamiya's primer on metal figures and it works very well in that application.  But such pieces are less prone to flexing, would helps lift the paint away, and the surfaces are probably already rougher than the surface of a piece of photo-etch, so the primer can "grip" or "bite" into the surface more effectively.

It tends to chip and peel from cast metal landing gear as well if any masking is done on the painted surface.  That being said, I may have been too quick to give a positive review of the Mr. Metal Primer.  I coated the metal core of the Su-25 nose gear with it and let that dry before putting the plastic pieces around the outside.  While carefully scraping the seams on the plastic pieces, I noticed that just my handling the nose gear was causing the dried Mr. Metal Primer to start peeling off the metal.  I'll experiment with it a little more to see how it does after it gets a coat of paint on top of it.  There is no question it significantly improved adhesion with photo etch, but if it fails the white metal test I'll defnitely be using it only for photo etch.  The stuff is way too nasty to be messing with much if it doesn't do the job for white metal any better than the Tamiya primer I already use for everything else.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

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