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Painting and gluing safety (difficulty with getting comfortable with scale modeling)

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  • Member since
    February 2021
Painting and gluing safety (difficulty with getting comfortable with scale modeling)
Posted by ScaleModeler_1973 on Friday, March 12, 2021 2:45 PM

Hello. I only started reading and posting on the FSM forums last month. I am a relatively late newcomer to scale model building and painting (I'm well into my forties). My level of engagement with the hobby has ebbed and flowed over the past few years. And the biggest challenge I face with it (aside from the fact that my body shakes a lot, complicating delicate tasks like gluing and painting) is that I haven't been able to get into a comfortable working area for my hobby. I live in an apartment during the week, and then most weekends I go home to visit my mother at her home. So my two places for building models are a table in my apartment living room and a desk in the basement of my mother's house. Try as I may not to do so, I still am evidently breathing too much of the plastic cement fumes when I glue. And the time I tried painting enamels on a model witha brush, it really made me light headed a couple of minutes after I stopped (I only painted one color and used some thinner). I have never been overcome by gluing or painting fumes, but I do sometimes get light headed. A couple of times after gluing, I practically 'slumped' into a nearby chair. Obivously, I'm not doing something right... I've tried tweaking my hobby working area conditions. Lately, I've been running a medium size fan right next to my hobby mat and have it pointed towards my open apartment deck screen door which is fully open now that nicer weather has come).Yet still I sometimes get woozy after working on my models. I don't feel right after gluing. I've read on a few of these foums that 'ventilation' is the key. I don't know what else I can do (open screen door , fan blowing away from me, etc. It really vexes me. I just wish I could get comfortable and feel safe with scale modeling; And get out of this cycle of disengaging from the hobby out of concern for my health for a while and then coming back to it again after a few months off (I've bought quite a few paints, glues, model kits, tools, etc. over the few years). Maybe I just have to do all of my hobby work outside on the (open air) patio? (that brings its own challenges with the weather/wind/rain, etc. of course). Oddly, I have airbrushed several times outdoors, always wearing a 3M respirator, and I have never  gotten woozy before. Anyway, I know people might understandably think I'm a dunce for not being able to figure this out on my own. I don't know if anyone can make a constructive suggestion/recommendation with which I might solve this 'puzzle' and finally be able to fully engage the hobby? Thank you if you have taken the time to read my post (and perhaps reply).

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Friday, March 12, 2021 3:54 PM

From the conditions you're describing, it sounds like you're doing everything you should be doing.  Are you absolutely sure its the model building that is doing that to you?  Have you talked about this with a doctor?  Its possible you may have a hypersensitivity to the chemicals involved, but there could be something else going on.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    January 2020
  • From: Maryland
Posted by wpwar11 on Friday, March 12, 2021 5:00 PM

I think Eagle has a good point.  I would check with a doctor.  No harm doing that.  Just a thought here but why not wear the 3M respiratior while using glue?  I have a 3M too and it's very comfortable.  

  • Member since
    February 2021
Posted by ScaleModeler_1973 on Friday, March 12, 2021 6:21 PM

Hey, thanks to you both for sharing your input into my situation. I really appreciate getting to bounce my problem off of a few other scale modelers.You make a good point: I don't really know its the model building that is causing this. I last saw my general doctor in December of 2019: I wanted to see if there was a reason why I was getting winded so easily during a Saturday morning exercise class I joined. My doctor and some other specialists checked out a battery of tests (on my heart, breathing, bloodwork, and such).  Everything came back basically normal, and my doctor advised me I just was  an out of shape person and needed to exercise more:) (Now I walk outside almost every day for exercise). Anyway, apologies, I know this isnt a medical advice forum- the point of my story is that I, too, realize now it would be a good idea for me to consult my doctor about this trouble I have been experiencing with the periodic lightheadedness. Hopefully, there is not something more serious at play. I'm kicking myself for not thinking to bring this up with my doctor earlier. So thanks for that encouragement. Also, thanks for the suggestion about wearing my respirator while I am gluing. Pure genius: I didn't think outside of the box enough to come up with that great idea- I was just so used to only using my respirator for airbrushing and never considered doing so for gluing, too. I've got the spare filter cartridges, and I am going to use my respirator when I build now, too. This is a great forum. As you can probably see, I'm not the brightest guy, but everyone is friendly and helpful here, and I appreciate that. Thanks again.  

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Friday, March 12, 2021 6:42 PM

No problem.  My suggestion was due to a personal experience I had recently with random lightheadedness that seemingly correlated with the type of breakfast cereal I was eating in the morning.  It would get so bad sometimes...sometimes when I was driving...that I would have to pull off the road and wait it out.  Took a couple of years of going to various doctors before one finally figured out what it was.  It was internal hemorrhaging from the hemogenesis stage of a tumor I had growing inside me.  I'm in remission now...almost 1 year down since treatments/surgeries ended...CEA tests and CT scans still clear...WOOHOO!  Not trying to scare you, but sometimes little things can be indicators of big trouble.

Using a respirator never hurts though.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    January 2020
  • From: Maryland
Posted by wpwar11 on Saturday, March 13, 2021 4:48 PM

That's awesome Eagle.  I wish you continued good health.  Cheers to you my modeling friend.

Paul

 

  • Member since
    October 2020
Posted by rcguy on Friday, April 2, 2021 8:43 PM

When I first got back into modeling last fall I was having issues with glue fumes.

I purchased 2 small 4" fans to created airflow across my modeling table.

One fan blowing across the the work area and another fan taking the air away from the work area

Works great and I have not had a problem since.

As far as painting "always" wear a proper respirator.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, April 3, 2021 8:45 PM

The only paint that ever bothered me was the old Floquil.

At 83 I also get the shakes a lot.  I minimize it by reducing the number and lengths of muscles between the model and the tool.  That is, I try to have left hand touching the model, right fingers holding too, and bases of thumbs touching each other.  Seems to help.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    June 2020
Posted by JimLo on Friday, May 7, 2021 11:02 AM

Hi,

How is your eyesight? Sometimes that might affect your balance if you are focusing on something close up for along time.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, May 8, 2021 9:22 AM

JimLo

Hi,

How is your eyesight? Sometimes that might affect your balance if you are focusing on something close up for along time.

 

Oh yes.  I can only do that sort of work for about fifteen minutes between breaks.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Sunday, May 9, 2021 5:44 PM

Hi;

     Having a problem I can sympathise with you. After my Open Heart surgery to correct an Aneurisim on the heart wall I have had issues; They have consisted of stopping breathing while I sleep(Sleep Apnea) and C.O.P.D. Sooooo I now use a 3-M mask and make sure everything is closed and the area well ventilated. Now, that means I have a hazard level 1 filter on the vacuum attached to my paint Booth. Plus I use Glues that do have strong oders. Thus, a fan blowing in my face and the glue out of the airflow area as much as I can.

 You seem to be doing everything right. Check with your Doctor and see if you need to have tests by a Pulmonologist for lung sensitivities to these things and others. I developed a skin sensitivity to Resin dust of any kind-So no resin models for me or parts. Of any kind!

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, May 10, 2021 7:50 AM

I have developed an allergy to sawdust.  Since I use wood a lot in my scratch activities, I have to wear a good mask when I have to saw or sand the stuff- also face shield to keep it out of my eyes.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Monday, May 10, 2021 10:20 AM

I now get sinus infections very easily so wear either a dust mask, N95 mask or 3m respirator for many functions I never used to. Gluing hasn't been among those as yet but that's today, one never knows about tomorrow in more ways than one...

  • Member since
    April 2021
Posted by Cafguy on Monday, May 17, 2021 1:32 PM

Nobody here thinks you are a dunce>  You might be sensetive to the chemical reaction of certian glues.  Ventelation I think would help you the most Buy a few small fans and piont the air away from you.  I remember when I first started useing the liquid glues the fumes really bothered me so I got a fan and It really helped.

Life tip:  Skip marrage: find the women you hate the most and buy her a house and car.

  • Member since
    February 2021
Posted by ScaleModeler_1973 on Wednesday, May 26, 2021 4:12 AM

Hello folks. I'm checking back in on this thread after being gone for a while. Thanks to everyone for sharing your experiences and advice (and encouragement) on this topic. In addition to having a fan blowing and my screen door open, I have switched to wearing my respirator even for minor/short gluing sessions. Thus far (over the past several weeks), I encouragingly have not been having any of the adverse problems (light-headedness, etc.) that I had been having without using my respirator. It's really become almost second nature for me to strap it on now before I open the plastic cement bottle. I've started experiementing with dry hand-brushing Vallejo rust pigments on to one of my models, too. I notice that poofs of visible pigment dust get churned up when I brush the powder. While it might be 'overkill' to do so, I also use the respirator for this activity too (just to be on the safe side). I'm still following up with my doctor (have a physical scheduled for next month) to see if there could be something else at play medically, too. 

  • Member since
    April 2021
Posted by Cafguy on Wednesday, June 16, 2021 1:25 PM

DUDE pretty much anything we do is going to involve either breathing in plastic dust or breathing in HARSH chemicals. if I were you I would wear the respirator. Better safe than sorry lol

 

Life tip:  Skip marrage: find the women you hate the most and buy her a house and car.

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