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How many airbrushes do you use?

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  • Member since
    February 2021
How many airbrushes do you use?
Posted by MJY65 on Wednesday, March 24, 2021 3:50 PM

I currently have an Iwata HP-CS for most of my work and an HP-TH with the fan tip installed for broad coverage like priming.   I love both for their intended purpose, but am considering adding one with an even finer spray pattern for detail work.  I find that the HP-CS is just a bit much for free hand camo on 1:72 scale jets and haven't been pleased with the results masking it off.

Am I chasing a futile endeavor?  

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Wednesday, March 24, 2021 4:09 PM

Just one the Iwata HP-CS

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Wednesday, March 24, 2021 4:18 PM

Paasche - H - 95% of my work

Badger Renegade Krome for double action work - still learning here

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    January 2010
Posted by rob44 on Wednesday, March 24, 2021 4:22 PM

2 Iwatas one for enamels, one for acrylics

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Wednesday, March 24, 2021 4:59 PM

I have a Paasche H and an Iwata HP-CS.  Keep going back to my Paasche H.

Just out of curiosity, what kind of camo patterns are you doing mostly?  I've mostly done SEA and SIOP Air Force camo and have gotten good results with my Paasche H by masking with frisket film and then using snakes of BlueTack to "soften" the edge of the film to get a to-scale feather between colors.  Did JAWS camo on an A-10A freehand with it, but that's pretty busy camo, so there was quite a bit of microscopic splatter that really isn't noticeable like it would have been with SEA and SIOP.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Wednesday, March 24, 2021 5:04 PM

Just one...Badger Anthem.

Does everything from fine lines and Luftwaffe mottle in 1/144 to whole car bodies, never clogs, dead-easy to clean.

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    December 2020
Posted by TheDemiGod on Wednesday, March 24, 2021 5:11 PM

I own 3. Paashe (my workhourse), Iwata NEO and Badger

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Wednesday, March 24, 2021 6:15 PM

I have the same two as you, for the same reasons as you.

I do have third brush, a Harder & Steenbeck Evolution Silverline 2 in 1, which comes with a .4mm and .2mm tip/nozzle.

I like the H&S better than the HP, but for reasons even I don't understand, I use the HP more. I do believe the H&S with the .2mm has finer control than the HP-CS, but can't say if it would be fine enough to meet your needs.

Though I think your two existing brushes are fine choices, I don't know much about super-fine airbrushing so I'll keep quiet on that part and hope those who do will chime in.

-Greg

  • Member since
    February 2021
Posted by MJY65 on Wednesday, March 24, 2021 6:18 PM

Eaglecash867
Just out of curiosity, what kind of camo patterns are you doing mostly?  I've mostly done SEA and SIOP Air Force camo and have gotten good results with my Paasche H by masking with frisket film and then using snakes of BlueTack to "soften" the edge of the film to get a to-scale feather between colors.

 

Right now, I'm working on Vietnam era USAF green/brown camo.  Not a particularly difficult pattern, it's just the feathering that's giving me grief.  I've tried Frisket, but could you elaborate on how you apply the blue tack?  Are you using the radius and undercut of the rope to create a gap that feathers when you spray perpendicular to the surface?

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Wednesday, March 24, 2021 6:35 PM

MJY65

 
I use the rope right along the edge of the frisket and just gently push it down enough to get it to seal onto the frisket and stick to the model itself with just a tiny bit of overhang along the edge of the frisket.
 
Here are some pics of the same type of camo you're doing on the wings of the F-111E I'm working on.  
 
Masking/painting WIP examples
 

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Wednesday, March 24, 2021 6:56 PM

I have several Badgers and one Neo. If you want super performance on smaller scales like 1/72 then you need a Badger My oldest Badger dates to the mid 1970s and I still use it.

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    January 2020
  • From: Maryland
Posted by wpwar11 on Wednesday, March 24, 2021 7:37 PM

I have two.  The Iwata HPCS does all the heavy lifting and its a great brush.  I also use a Gunze PS 771 for fine detail work like painting super small squiggles and panel lines. im super happy with both.  

  • Member since
    July 2009
  • From: North Carolina
Posted by Back to the bench on Wednesday, March 24, 2021 9:13 PM

I have a Badger Renegade Velocity and Patriot 105.

I find the Renegade very easy to spray detail with, even in 1/72 and smaller. No clogging, sputtering or spitting. So far I have only sprayed old Model Master enamels though. The only thing I don't care for on the Renegade is how tiny the nozzle is (think a little larger than a grain of rice size). Now that I am more "chronoligially challenged" it can take a bit more effort not to drop that nozzle during the cleaning process.

I suspect it is just me but the trigger on the 105 seems more like a switch. The action is smooth but I have trouble getting anything but max flow rate so it may become a primer gun.

I have been tempted to get one of the H/S airbrushes, the larger nozzle size looks appealing and they seem to have a good reputation. It also seems you can't go wrong with the Iwata brand.

My first airbrush was a gift from my brother when I was just a kid in jr. high but getting really interested in trying to build better models. It was a Binks Wren and I wish for the sake of nostalgia parts were still available lol. That thing ran just fine for a good 15-20 years but the seals finally dried out and cracked.

 

Gil
  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Wednesday, March 24, 2021 9:46 PM

Back to the bench

I have a Badger Renegade Velocity and Patriot 105.

I find the Renegade very easy to spray detail with, even in 1/72 and smaller. No clogging, sputtering or spitting. So far I have only sprayed old Model Master enamels though. The only thing I don't care for on the Renegade is how tiny the nozzle is (think a little larger than a grain of rice size). Now that I am more "chronoligially challenged" it can take a bit more effort not to drop that nozzle during the cleaning process.

I suspect it is just me but the trigger on the 105 seems more like a switch. The action is smooth but I have trouble getting anything but max flow rate so it may become a primer gun.

I have been tempted to get one of the H/S airbrushes, the larger nozzle size looks appealing and they seem to have a good reputation. It also seems you can't go wrong with the Iwata brand.

My first airbrush was a gift from my brother when I was just a kid in jr. high but getting really interested in trying to build better models. It was a Binks Wren and I wish for the sake of nostalgia parts were still available lol. That thing ran just fine for a good 15-20 years but the seals finally dried out and cracked.

 

 

I also have a Renegade and it’s great at fine details too.

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Thursday, March 25, 2021 1:03 AM

I use my ancient Badger 200 for just about everything.  I have a double action Iwata that works fine, but I am more comfortable with the Badger.

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    March 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Thursday, March 25, 2021 5:13 PM

MJY65
I have a variety of airbrushes, Iwata, Badgers and Paasche, but at the spray booth I almost exclusively use the Bager 100G, 100LG and the lastest Sotar 2020. With the number of different size nozzles available, wide area to finer detail spraying can be easily done.

For my use I think a very important part of finer detail work, like camo borders, is finding the best thinning ratio and PSI combination. Using Tamiya acrylics, the free hand really fine borders are routinely done thinned at about 70-80% thinner, X-20A or 71% alcohol, both work well, and usually at about 12PSI. Several light passes work better than a single heavy pass. 

I agree with other posts, your HP-CS is certainly capable of doing whatever job you require. Mostly a matter of acquiring the ideal needle/nozzle combination, then finding the right paint mixture. Experimenting will get you there.

Good luck.     

I currently have an Iwata HP-CS for most of my work and an HP-TH with the fan tip installed for broad coverage like priming.   I love both for their intended purpose, but am considering adding one with an even finer spray pattern for detail work.  I find that the HP-CS is just a bit much for free hand camo on 1:72 scale jets and haven't been pleased with the results masking it off.

Am I chasing a futile endeavor?  

 

  • Member since
    February 2021
Posted by MJY65 on Thursday, March 25, 2021 6:19 PM

patrick206
I agree with other posts, your HP-CS is certainly capable of doing whatever job you require. Mostly a matter of acquiring the ideal needle/nozzle combination, then finding the right paint mixture. Experimenting will get you there. 

 

I could be mistaken, but I don't think the HP-CS has any finer needle options.  It comes with the .35 and parts are available for .5.  I do plan to try some additional thinner and backing off pressure. 

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Thursday, March 25, 2021 7:10 PM

MJY65
I could be mistaken, but I don't think the HP-CS has any finer needle options. It comes with the .35 and parts are available for .5.

That is my understanding as well.

Speaking of fine tips, here's an experiment. On your HP-TH, take off the fan-pattern head and mount the regular one. Then mess with the HP-TH and see how fine of a pattern/line you can manage.

Might just change your thinking about needing a finer airbrush. Or not.

-Greg

  • Member since
    February 2021
Posted by ScaleModeler_1973 on Saturday, March 27, 2021 6:00 PM

Hello folks. In response to the thread question, I just use a $35 generic airbrush. But that may be part of my airbrushing problems (I'm thinking of buying a more expensive one). I have airbrushed for about twelve to fifteen sessions in my short armor scale model building experience, at both the 1/16th and 1/35th scales. I'm not encountering much 'success' by any standards. I have read thoroughly a couple of the FSM branded 'how to' airbrushing and scale model building instructional books. I've tried implementing what I see demonstrated in the books. But I often get derailed figuratively speaking early in a painting session (airbrush loses pressure, paint sometimes comes out in too narrow of a band (I've been using a .3 needle- for some reason in my early airbrushing, paint came out in a wide stream which let me cover the relatively larger size of my 1/16th scale Panther G, etc, but the last few sessions, it has only come out in a more needle like swath [no wider than the diameter of a No. 2 pencil]). I only have used acrylic paint thus far (Vallejo and a bit of Tamiya (thinned)). I do thoroughly clean my airbrush (shooting cleaner through it) and disassemble it (removing needle and other parts) after use.  I guess my long-winded question is how much of success with airbrushing (turning out quality finished paint jobs on one's scale models) is operator skill/talent and how much is attributable to the quality of the tools one uses (airbrush, compressor, paints, etc.)? I thought that I could invest in more expensive tools after gaining some skill with a cheaper setup. But maybe the best way to set oneself up for success with airbrushing is by buying/starting off with better tools (from the start)? I know this is a thread about what airbrushes one uses, and I hope it is OK for me to pose this beginner-type question here? Thanks for your time. 

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Saturday, March 27, 2021 6:15 PM

ScaleModeler_1973, not sure what type of airbrush you're using right now, but when you're starting out you might consider a single-action siphon-feed airbrush like a Paasche H.  It is extremely easy to use and you control the width of the stream by adjusting the needle cap before shooting paint.  As you get more comfortable with that, then you can try moving to a double-action gravity-feed.  The latter of those is supposed to give you more versatility, but to be honest, I keep going back to the Paasche H I started with as a teenager...never really found a need for anything more complex.  As far as learning techniques goes, the best teacher is going to be experimentation on your own.  I have watched some of those instructional videos myself to see if I can pick something up that I hadn't thought of, but I just usually end up cringing at how much paint is getting thrown down all at once.  I definitely do things a little differently than some do them, and that's one of the reasons I like this hobby so much.  What works for somebody else might not work for you, and vice versa...and its all about individual preferences.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    February 2021
Posted by MJY65 on Saturday, March 27, 2021 6:21 PM

ScaleModeler_1973

Hello folks. In response to the thread question, I just use a $35 generic airbrush. But that may be part of my airbrushing problems (I'm thinking of buying a more expensive one). .............. I guess my long-winded question is how much of success with airbrushing (turning out quality finished paint jobs on one's scale models) is operator skill/talent and how much is attributable to the quality of the tools one uses (airbrush, compressor, paints, etc.)? I thought that I could invest in more expensive tools after gaining some skill with a cheaper setup. But maybe the best way to set oneself up for success with airbrushing is by buying/starting off with better tools (from the start)? I know this is a thread about what airbrushes one uses, and I hope it is OK for me to pose this beginner-type question here? Thanks for your time. 

 

When I got back into modeling, I dug out my supplies from 30 years ago including a very basic Paasche airbrush.  I found it to be totally unsatisfactory for acrylics, so decided to invest in the two Iwata brushes in my OP.

I don't think I possess the inate artistic talent to become truly great in a creative sense.  On the other hand, I can say with a high level of confidence that the better quality equipment advanced me several rungs up the ladder very quickly.  There's still a lot to figure out in terms of thinning and technique, but that's a lot easier when you aren't fighting the equipment at the same time.  

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Saturday, March 27, 2021 6:33 PM

ScaleModeler_1973

Hello folks. In response to the thread question, I just use a $35 generic airbrush. But that may be part of my airbrushing problems (I'm thinking of buying a more expensive one). I have airbrushed for about twelve to fifteen sessions in my short armor scale model building experience, at both the 1/16th and 1/35th scales. I'm not encountering much 'success' by any standards. I have read thoroughly a couple of the FSM branded 'how to' airbrushing and scale model building instructional books. I've tried implementing what I see demonstrated in the books. But I often get derailed figuratively speaking early in a painting session (airbrush loses pressure, paint sometimes comes out in too narrow of a band (I've been using a .3 needle- for some reason in my early airbrushing, paint came out in a wide stream which let me cover the relatively larger size of my 1/16th scale Panther G, etc, but the last few sessions, it has only come out in a more needle like swath [no wider than the diameter of a No. 2 pencil]). I only have used acrylic paint thus far (Vallejo and a bit of Tamiya (thinned)). I do thoroughly clean my airbrush (shooting cleaner through it) and disassemble it (removing needle and other parts) after use.  I guess my long-winded question is how much of success with airbrushing (turning out quality finished paint jobs on one's scale models) is operator skill/talent and how much is attributable to the quality of the tools one uses (airbrush, compressor, paints, etc.)? I thought that I could invest in more expensive tools after gaining some skill with a cheaper setup. But maybe the best way to set oneself up for success with airbrushing is by buying/starting off with better tools (from the start)? I know this is a thread about what airbrushes one uses, and I hope it is OK for me to pose this beginner-type question here? Thanks for your time. 

 

If your pattern has changed that much then you probably aren't getting the nozzle tip as clean as you think you are. Or too, you could be not getting the same mix consistency in thinning the paint. Tamiya cleans up easy with some lacquer thinner or alcohol. But if you have dried paint inside that tip then regardless of the brand paint you may need to give that tip a good overnight soaking in lacquer thinner.

Usually you can give those less expensive airbrushes a little tune up and they spray fine. But indeed a Paasche H is pretty fool proof to get started airbrushing with by comparison .

  • Member since
    July 2009
  • From: North Carolina
Posted by Back to the bench on Saturday, March 27, 2021 8:19 PM

ScaleModeler_1973

Hello folks. In response to the thread question, I just use a $35 generic airbrush. But that may be part of my airbrushing problems (I'm thinking of buying a more expensive one). I have airbrushed for about twelve to fifteen sessions in my short armor scale model building experience, at both the 1/16th and 1/35th scales. I'm not encountering much 'success' by any standards. I have read thoroughly a couple of the FSM branded 'how to' airbrushing and scale model building instructional books. I've tried implementing what I see demonstrated in the books. But I often get derailed figuratively speaking early in a painting session (airbrush loses pressure, paint sometimes comes out in too narrow of a band (I've been using a .3 needle- for some reason in my early airbrushing, paint came out in a wide stream which let me cover the relatively larger size of my 1/16th scale Panther G, etc, but the last few sessions, it has only come out in a more needle like swath [no wider than the diameter of a No. 2 pencil]). I only have used acrylic paint thus far (Vallejo and a bit of Tamiya (thinned)). I do thoroughly clean my airbrush (shooting cleaner through it) and disassemble it (removing needle and other parts) after use.  I guess my long-winded question is how much of success with airbrushing (turning out quality finished paint jobs on one's scale models) is operator skill/talent and how much is attributable to the quality of the tools one uses (airbrush, compressor, paints, etc.)? I thought that I could invest in more expensive tools after gaining some skill with a cheaper setup. But maybe the best way to set oneself up for success with airbrushing is by buying/starting off with better tools (from the start)? I know this is a thread about what airbrushes one uses, and I hope it is OK for me to pose this beginner-type question here? Thanks for your time. 

 

 

First of all no need to apologize for posting a question, the overwhelming majority of people on these forums really enjoy helping each other. Also, I am by no means an expert so feel free to take anything I say with a grain of salt. As others have mentioned a good single action airbrush is the most straight forward to use and that is also what I learned with.  Almost any endevour that involves tools can certainly be made horribly frustrating with poor quality tools. Especially if you are not experienced enough to overcome the deficiencies in that tool. If you have the resources I would tend to start with a single action airbrush from one of the well known manufacturers. I actually have a friend who has consistently won in the most competitve catagories at IPMS nationals for many years and he still uses his trusty Badger 350 and Vallejo paints as far as I know. He just knows that tool and his materials frontwards and backwards and achieves amazing results. One other thing that I did not see unless I missed it is the type of air supply you are using. The cans of propellant are notorious for losing pressure as they are used due to the cooling of the expanding propellant when it leaves the can. If you are using a compressor and live in a humid climate then water traps/filters are a necessity (and good practice anywhere). It might also be a good idea to practice on some scrap plastic or an old kit you can use as a "test mule".  Some folks also use plastic signs from the local home center or you can purchase a large bag of plastic spoons to practice on. At least then you are not under the pressure of seeing your expensive (especially at 1/16 scale) kit with a paint job you are very unhappy with. Heck even cardboard can be used to practice on until you start feeling more comfortable. The first thing I tried to achieve when starting out was repeatability. Even if it was not a great result but it was repeatable then it seemed I started progressing. Also mentioned in this forum recently is the recommended practice of writing down the combination of paint/thinner/air pressure etc. that you use when you are trying a new combination. It can get overwhelming keeping track of all the details when you are trying to find what works best for your setup and skill level. I have never met a person that uses an airbrush that did not deal with these frustrations when they started and also on occasion even after they are very experienced. It is a deceptively complex process but that is also what makes it so rewarding when I happen to get it right! Time spent using the tool is the key and I predict you will get it figured out and spend a lot of enjoyable hours at the spray bench in the future.

 

This is one website that has a wealth of good general info on airbrushes...

https://sites.google.com/site/donsairbrushtips/

Gil
  • Member since
    May 2004
  • From: Land of Lakes
Posted by cbaltrin on Saturday, March 27, 2021 8:31 PM

I started modeling so I would have an excuse to buy an airbrush...a paasche VL... that was 40 years ago..

Now I have 4 Iwatas--BCS, CS, CR  & RG3

On the Bench:

1.Tamiya 1/72 N1K1

2.Monogram F-14A

3.Tamiya A-1H

4.Hasegawa A-1H (OTS)

5.Monogram P-51D

6.Revell HH-3 Golly Green  Giant

7.Monogram 1/72 F-4J

Recenctly Completed:

1.Airfix 1/72 Fw190D (1976 Release)

2.Italeri F-100D 1/72 Thors Hammer

3.Monogram P-47D Bubbletop 78th FG Top Hat

dlh
  • Member since
    March 2017
  • From: Chambersburg, PA
Posted by dlh on Sunday, March 28, 2021 10:23 AM

Iwata SAR, HP-CS, HP-C+

Badger Sotar 20/20, 200G

Paasche H1016

I almost always use the C+.  The Sotar for some fine stuff and Alclad chrome, and the Paasche for primer sometimes. I used the 200G before I got a good deal on the Sotar.

Dave

I just like to collect things.

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Sunday, March 28, 2021 1:56 PM

cbaltrin
I started modeling so I would have an excuse to buy an airbrush...a paasche VL... that was 40 years ago..

I like that! Big Smile

Yes

-Greg

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Sunday, March 28, 2021 2:19 PM

The short reply is I have 3 airbrushes. Could just end there.

 

But: I use my 47 yo original Badger 200 ( non F) with fine needle perhaps most. I do use it's backup the Pasche H quite a bit with the acrylics though. I'm presently in a holding pattern using that H lately actually. I could live with just either one but the 200 fine tip is a very nice tip with very fine atomization with lacquers especially. Then I have the Ganzton Iwata knock off I tuned up, it sprays beautiful but I favor the other two. It's not about the brand, Double action gains me 0 for how I spray. On the double action I end up screwing in the needle stop anyway. If I did canvas art work I could see the benefit for that with DA but not on my models.

My 200 with fine tip is certainly my favorite for MM Metalizers, it was awesome. But of course I have about 2/3 bottle of silver plate buffing left and that's the end of that stash never to be seen again. No aluminum I've seen yet matches that buffing paint, it just did everything right.

  • Member since
    May 2020
  • From: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Posted by Deeve_ on Sunday, March 28, 2021 3:33 PM

I have 4, Pasche VL, Pasche H, Iwata HP-BC and an Iwata HP-C+

 

I started with the VL and the HP-BC. My mother tried her hand at airbrushing back in the 90s and these and a compresser were sitting unused for 10 years. She "lent" them to me and I started and learned using them. I picked up the H because I wanted a good single stage for mass coverage type deals. 

 

I got extremely tired of the cleanup and the inherent problems with syphon feed airbrushing, so I picked up the C+. Since getting the C+, I can honestly say I dont use any of the other ones anymore. The cleanup is so easy with the gravity feed style, it is unreal. I have a sink nearby to my airbrush booth and it makes cleanup fast. I am able to switch colours and do small amounts of paint with ease.

 In Progress.

1/72 Revell Arado AR-240-c2

1/72 Hasegawa Mitchell Mk.III RAAF

1/72 Italeri XB-70 Valkyrie

Deeve_

  • Member since
    February 2021
Posted by ScaleModeler_1973 on Sunday, March 28, 2021 4:02 PM

I always preface my reply (after posting a question) by (honestly) telling you folks that I appreciate all of your input and the wealth of experience you are sharing with a beginning modeler/airbrusher. I know it takes time to read and reply to questions from fellow posters. So thanks! Please let me clarify/explain a bit further. I described using a 'generic' cheap airbrush. On the case of mine, it reads 'Master' 'Model G-233'. I don't know if anyone has used this type of airbrush? But I do know that it is double action: I have to press the trigger down and then rock it back some to get paint to 'discharge'. I think some posters suggestion to try using a single action airbrush (such as a Badger 350 or Passche H) is a good idea (that I should have latched onto earlier). I didn't make the connection that a double action is harder to use than a single one: I just thought that it is a stylistic decision as to which one a hobbyist chooses to use. Now I know better. I am going to buy one of the single actions-I see some of them really are not that expensive at all, too. I am using a 'Point Zero' 1/5th HP with regulator water trap, tankless compressor. Like my airbrush, I bought it on Amazon. I notice that it only revs up and really works hard when I depress the trigger on my airbrush. I think this is because it is 'tankless'? It costed about $75. I don't know if I should invest in a better brand/more expensive compressor (with more features-like an air tank)? I really appreciate, too, the empathy that some of your more experienced users extended to me a newbie in commenting on the mental/emotional toll/experience that comes from encountering difficulties with this hobby: It is admittedly a bit depressing and frustrating when you have to cut short a painting session due to technical problems and do poorly on a scale model that you have spent time carefully building. I guess I feel encouraged knowing that other hobbyists have their ups and downs, too, especially in the early going... But the important thing is to keep trying to learn and improve. What a great idea to buy inexpensive plastic signs, or even just spoons to practice airbrushing on rather than my finished models:) Ironically, my airbrushing of my 1/16th scale Panther G actually went decently: the paint adhered OK and I was able to spray it pretty consistently (the only problem was that I did not think to stir my Vallejo dunkelgelb paint beforehand (I only shook the bottle up), and the finished paint job looks more greenish than dark yellow (It looks like an unripened banana, haha). But I know historical accuracy with respect to paint shades of World War Two tanks is relative, too. I'm not sure if I can paint yellow over my Panther G or if there is some way to strip off the greenish paint and try it again with properly sitrred paint? I have heard that 1/35th scale plastic models can be soaked into stripper/thinner and paint removed that way. But I can't do that with my 1/16th scale tank because of the electronics attached to it. Thanks for the tips about making sure that I am cleaning my airbrush more thoroughly (especially the nozzle) and for being mindful of how well I am mixing/what ratios I am using to thin my paints (the non ready to airbrush brands like Tamiya). I am getting a lot of variation in the width of my spray so there may very well be something partially clogging up the works in my airbrush or maybe the paint is just too thick. What I am basically hearing from posters who replied to my question is that there is a learning curve for picking up airbrushing (and there will be proverbial 'growing pains'), but investing in some better tools might help take some of the guess work  away and spare me some of the biggest (frustrations...) in this process. Thanks again for being so receptive to helping out a fellow hobbyist. I will report back periodically to hopefully share some of my progress, even if it is in small steps.

  • Member since
    February 2021
Posted by ScaleModeler_1973 on Sunday, March 28, 2021 4:08 PM

Oh, one follow up question that I have about siphon fed single action airbrushes: I have been using a gravity fed airbrush (cup on the top), and I am wondering with a siphon fed, do you end up 'wasting' more paint because the bottom of the jar can't be reached by the tube? I guess if so, this is a minor consideration. Put differently, I am not clear on how the paint goes upward through the tube (is it powered by the air flow when I pulll the trigger on my airbrush)? Just trying to picture how a siphoon fed airbrush works.

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