SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Stripping off paint

1257 views
16 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    January 2021
  • From: Somewhere near Chicago
Stripping off paint
Posted by Teenage Modeler on Tuesday, July 13, 2021 10:45 AM

I sprayed Tamiya TS-30 onto my car model. Unfortunately, a piece of paper towel dried onto a spot on the paint, and when I pulled it pff, it revealed a nasty rough mark, that can be easily seen (a small mark). I tried to sand the rough spot off, and spray with Tamiya TS-30, but I sprayed it on too thick. I tried to wipe the excess paint on the body with a paper towel, but it left a nasty paper towel line where I wiped it off, and it was all over the side of the body.

Open Photo

I decided maybe I should strip the paint on this side of the model. Maybe the entire model. But, can somebody help me, and I ask:

How do I fix this? Should I strip the paint off, or sand it off? 

If I were to sand it, how long should I wait, and what grit of sandpaper should I use?

If I were to strip the paint off, Can I use Isopropyl Alcohol? 

The paint is a TS-30 Silver Leaf by Tamiya. It is Laquer.

One more question, can 91% Isopropyl Alcohol dissolve Laqcuer? Specifically the TS spray line? 

EDIT: Yesterday, I started to sand it with 3000 grit, all the way to 8000 grit. It did smoothen it, but I want to ask you all here to see what else I should do. Here is what the model looks like after sanding it down 3000-8000:

Open Photo

I would say this is enough. But what should I do next? Should I let it cure and clearcoat it? Or should I paint one more layer and then add a clearcoat?

(keep in mind I have already put many layers of TS-13 (about 4). I am afraid that doing this more will make the surface details less recognizable, and will make the paint look gloopy.)

What should I do next?

I also do not have 1000 grit, only 3000-12000.

If only I could show my models to my friends...

 

 

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Tuesday, July 13, 2021 11:38 AM

Teenage Modeler
If I were to strip the paint off, Can I use Isopropyl Alcohol? 

Yes.  Isopropyl alcohol, especially at concentrations of 91% or higher, makes an awesome paint stripper.  The best part about it is that it will not chemically alter the plastic and make it brittle like oven cleaner will.  Just put it in a bath of the alcohol, soak it for about 20 minutes, and then start working the paint off with a cheap electric toothbrush.  The paint won't be coming off in chunks or flakes, it will be dissolving completely, so you'll see the alcohol clouding up with dissolved paint.  The important thing is that you have to keep the whole thing wet with alcohol while you work, so put on latex gloves and keep dipping the part back in the alcohol as you work.  With a little effort, you'll be able to get it stripped down to the bare plastic.  How long the paint has been on or what kind of paint it is won't matter.  I have stripped 25 year old model paint from parts that were on my shelf of doom for that long with no problems.

Also, make sure you only use isopropyl alcohol for this.  Don't use denatured alcohol, because it is not the same thing and often contains solvents that can damage the plastic.  Isopropyl is totally safe on styrene plastic.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    January 2021
  • From: Somewhere near Chicago
Posted by Teenage Modeler on Tuesday, July 13, 2021 12:12 PM

Eaglecash867

 

 
Teenage Modeler
If I were to strip the paint off, Can I use Isopropyl Alcohol? 

 

Yes.  Isopropyl alcohol, especially at concentrations of 91% or higher, makes an awesome paint stripper.  The best part about it is that it will not chemically alter the plastic and make it brittle like oven cleaner will.  Just put it in a bath of the alcohol, soak it for about 20 minutes, and then start working the paint off with a cheap electric toothbrush.  The paint won't be coming off in chunks or flakes, it will be dissolving completely, so you'll see the alcohol clouding up with dissolved paint.  The important thing is that you have to keep the whole thing wet with alcohol while you work, so put on latex gloves and keep dipping the part back in the alcohol as you work.  With a little effort, you'll be able to get it stripped down to the bare plastic.  How long the paint has been on or what kind of paint it is won't matter.  I have stripped 25 year old model paint from parts that were on my shelf of doom for that long with no problems.

Also, make sure you only use isopropyl alcohol for this.  Don't use denatured alcohol, because it is not the same thing and often contains solvents that can damage the plastic.  Isopropyl is totally safe on styrene plastic.

 

I just painted my model car with lacquer. I mean, I painted it 3 days ago, and also just paunted the floppy layer now. Do I have to wait for the paint to fully dry before stripping, or can I dunk it in Isopropyl alcohol right now, when the paint is still not fully cured?

I would also like to add, what will happen to the primer?

 

If only I could show my models to my friends...

 

 

  • Member since
    February 2021
Posted by MJY65 on Tuesday, July 13, 2021 12:17 PM

The sooner the better when stripping.  

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Far Northern CA
Posted by mrmike on Tuesday, July 13, 2021 12:18 PM

If you want to repaint the entire model, Eaglecash867's advice is spot on. On the other hand, you may be happy with a repair...

Since the damage is confined, and you are dealing with fresh paint, it may be enough to mask only the part you wish to repair, following panel and opening lines to avoid damaging them. I would start by removing the bad parts with 600 grit wet sand and go thru 1000 or 1500 overall to break th surface gloss, being careful around the trim and "character" lines until you have a smoth surface. Mask fresh and repaint.

Hope this helps on the current or a future project! 

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Tuesday, July 13, 2021 12:19 PM

You can throw that in the alcohol to strip it any time.  The paint not being cured yet will just make it even easier to strip off.  The alcohol will take the primer off as well.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Tuesday, July 13, 2021 12:56 PM

Silver can be tricky just between separate panels never mind in a spot repair. And you're already overdone the coats according to your own words.So to me stripping and starting over is the key. I mentioned the purple pond in my other message because it's what I have on hand but I must say I use that mostly for acrylics. Alcohol may well be better suited in this case. Just don't try acetone or lacquer thinner lol !!

  • Member since
    January 2021
  • From: Somewhere near Chicago
Posted by Teenage Modeler on Tuesday, July 13, 2021 1:19 PM

mrmike

If you want to repaint the entire model, Eaglecash867's advice is spot on. On the other hand, you may be happy with a repair...

Since the damage is confined, and you are dealing with fresh paint, it may be enough to mask only the part you wish to repair, following panel and opening lines to avoid damaging them. I would start by removing the bad parts with 600 grit wet sand and go thru 1000 or 1500 overall to break th surface gloss, being careful around the trim and "character" lines until you have a smoth surface. Mask fresh and repaint.

Hope this helps on the current or a future project! 

 

To be honest, I just want to strip the paint in the area where the paint looks gloopy. I would just mask off the area, then add so alcohol, then let it dry and repaint. Thanks for the advice though!

If only I could show my models to my friends...

 

 

  • Member since
    February 2021
Posted by MJY65 on Tuesday, July 13, 2021 1:49 PM

Teenage Modeler
To be honest, I just want to strip the paint in the area where the paint looks gloopy. I would just mask off the area, then add so alcohol, then let it dry and repaint. Thanks for the advice though!

 

If you aren't stripping the whole thing, you may be better off sanding.  

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Tuesday, July 13, 2021 2:29 PM

I'll tell you what you SHOULD NOT USE. NEVER USE lacquer thinner to remove lacquer paint. I goofed up the paint on the door of a recent build. I soaked the door in lacquer thinner. The thinner dissolved the door into a blob of red goo.

Use alcohol and a tooth brush instead.

Your comments and questions are always welcome.

  • Member since
    August 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Tuesday, July 13, 2021 2:51 PM

The alcohol may loosen or dissolve the tape adhesive, creating a problem when it seeps under the edge

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Tuesday, July 13, 2021 4:08 PM

Yup.  Don't try using alcohol for spot repairs.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Tuesday, July 13, 2021 6:30 PM

Teenage Modeler

 

 
mrmike
 

To be honest, I just want to strip the paint in the area where the paint looks gloopy. I would just mask off the area, then add so alcohol, then let it dry and repaint. Thanks for the advice though!

 

It's your model, your project but I think to try spot repair in silver paint as your first attempt at spot repair is a mistake. I'll just say it once and be quiet about it and pray on your success. Be different if it was flat live drab on a tank but on a car finish you want to shine in silver just do it over. Nuff said.

  • Member since
    January 2021
  • From: Somewhere near Chicago
Posted by Teenage Modeler on Wednesday, July 14, 2021 7:18 AM

I started to sand it with 3000 grit, all the way to 8000 grit. It did smoothen it, but I want to ask you all here to see what else I should do. Here is what the model looks like after sanding it down 3000-8000:

Open Photo

I would say this is enough. But what should I do next? Should I let it cure and clearcoat it? Or should I paint one more layer and then add a clearcoat?

(keep in mind I have already put many layers of TS-13 (about 4). I am afraid that doing this more will make the surface details less recognizable, and will make the paint look gloopy.)

What should I do next?

If only I could show my models to my friends...

 

 

  • Member since
    February 2021
Posted by MJY65 on Wednesday, July 14, 2021 8:02 AM

Looks like you couldn't wait as suggested.

I'd say there are very few occasions where I've layered 4 coats of the same color on a model.  It just isn't necessary if the surface is prepped properly and leads to increased drying time.  

 

I wouldn't put anything on it right now.  STOP and let it fully cure, then re-assess.

  • Member since
    January 2021
  • From: Somewhere near Chicago
Posted by Teenage Modeler on Wednesday, July 14, 2021 8:18 AM

MJY65

Looks like you couldn't wait as suggested.

I'd say there are very few occasions where I've layered 4 coats of the same color on a model.  It just isn't necessary if the surface is prepped properly and leads to increased drying time.  

 

I wouldn't put anything on it right now.  STOP and let it fully cure, then re-assess.

 

Hm, okay. I guess I will let it dry fully and come back to it in a week.

If only I could show my models to my friends...

 

 

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Thursday, July 15, 2021 4:53 AM

If you want to put down a single even color coat with lacquer to even things up then a couple of days should be plenty of dry time. Lacquer coats are generally thinner than enamel coats or even some acrylics. Certainly faster curing than enamel. If it doesn't smell like fresh lacquer it's ready for a recoat if that's what you want to do.. If it gives a brain ache from the stink obviously it's not ready ( unlikely after a couple of days)..

 

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS
FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.