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Compressor problems- air tank a solution?

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  • Member since
    June 2021
Compressor problems- air tank a solution?
Posted by rocketman2000 on Thursday, August 26, 2021 4:39 PM

I have a problem witk my airbrush.  After thorough cleaning I am suspecting the compressor.

If it is the compresssor, I wonder if an air tank is a solution.  I have a small compressor in the garage, but it is REALLY noisy.  I would not want it operating in my shop.  If I filled it to 80 to 100psi, how large of a tank would I need, for, say half an hour of airbrushing?  I notice the prices go up quickly with volume.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    July 2014
Posted by modelcrazy on Thursday, August 26, 2021 5:08 PM

Sorry, I don't know the answer. There are far more members on here that can figure out a formula for that. I have a question, is a newer more quite compressor more expensive than a tank? I have no idea but just throwing it out there?

Steve

Building a kit from your stash is like cutting a head off a Hydra, two more take it's place.

 

 

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  • Member since
    August 2021
Posted by goldhammer88 on Thursday, August 26, 2021 5:42 PM

My guess would be something in the 20-30 gallon range.  The run time is going to be longer to fill.

Might look at the Fortress 2 gallon at HF.  $160, and around $200 with the extended warranty.  I have one, like it for a/b, and will run a nail gun if needed, and inflation duties.

Bought mine a couple of years ago.  At 60db, it can sit in the same room, and can barely hear it 15 ft away.

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Thursday, August 26, 2021 7:11 PM

Here's the compressor I use.  Its definitely quiet enough to be in your shop if you want to stick with the compressor route.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006ACB6D2/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    July 2009
  • From: North Carolina
Posted by Back to the bench on Thursday, August 26, 2021 8:28 PM

I poked around a little online and found this discussion of Boyles Law as it applies to air compressor applications. It was a thread on Redit and if you scroll down to the bottom of this reply where the "Boyles Law" example starts and use his calculation example with your numbers I think it will get you what you need. Note that his assumption for flow rate is .5 cfm for the airbrush. If your tank candidate volume is listed in gallons then I guess you would need to convert that to cuft. Hope this helps.

Basically im making a compressor. I have everything figured out. Except one thing.
If i have a compressed 400G gas cylinder, which im filling with compressed air. It can handle up to 379.9PSI. But due to what im using to fill it im expecting to get to about 150 PSI in the tank.
If i fill this tank to 150PSI and then turn the compressor off completely so it will not re-auto fill the tank. How long would i be able to use an airbrush at 25PSI. I have searched online but been unable to find any way to calculate this.
Any help appreciated.
 
Jack-of-some-trades
unable to find any way to calculate this.
Because there isn't. You need CFM not PSI to be able to calculate that.
OP·4y
Thank you!
Unfortunately, i wanted to calculate this before building to see how long i would be able to run on just tank. But it doesn't seem like i can without having the compressor to test from.
Thank you for your reply.
 
Boyles law: P1 V1 = P2 V2
150 psi = P1
50 L = 1.76573 cu ft = V1
25 psi = P2
V2 = (p1 v1) / p2 = (150 psi 1.76573 cuft) / 25 psi = 10.59438 cuft = Volume of air at 25 psi contained within a 50L container pressurized to 150 psi.
Iwata air brush - Air consumption rate ~ 0.5 cuft/min : http://www.iwata-medea.com/support/faqs/faqs-air-sources-and-compressors/
10.59438 cuft / 0.5 cuft/min = 21.18876 minutes of continuous use.
~21 minutes of continuous use without consideration for leaks
 
Here is a link to the discussion...
Gil
  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Sunday, August 29, 2021 4:51 AM

I can go through several sessions of painting with my 8 gal compressor before it needs refilling. I run the main pressure well down below where the compressor would normally have cycled back on , plug it in and refill when it drops below 40 psi or so. It's top pressure is 125 psi. I generally shoot at around 20-25 psi, so it's a non issue and of course if you shoot down around 10 psi as I have with lacquers and washes the tanks lasts longer. Best I got for ya.

You could also leave your noise compressor in the garage and plumb in a feed line to your work station and let it cycle at will out there.

  • Member since
    June 2021
Posted by rocketman2000 on Sunday, August 29, 2021 9:02 AM

I'm back to the idea that an air tank is no cheaper than a small compressor.  I will be taking my air brushes out to the garage today to test them with the compressor I have in garage.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Sunday, August 29, 2021 9:49 AM

For the prices being discussed, you could go the CO2 route.  I've been on CO2 for years - just thought I'd toss that out.

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    May 2021
Posted by OldRetiredEngineer on Sunday, August 29, 2021 10:10 AM

I think many modelers use oversized compressors and compensate with an air tank. My airbrush is an Iwata HP-Cplus, annd I use a small compressor - Sparmax TC-501N. single cylinder, no tank. The compressor is very quiet, and "keeps up" with the airbrush. If I depress the air valve for  max flow the compressor will still cycle to maintain pressure. I don't need a tank.

I'm not sure what the air brush airflow is. The flow of the compressor is also undefined. I do find the the 10' length of 1/8" hose acts as a small buffer for limiting compressor cycling. 

I don't need a compressor that operates shop equipmrnt or fills tires. I need a quiet, dependable compressor that works well with my airbrush. The Sparmax fits this quite well.

Note that Sparmax also makes a hobby compressor with two cylinders and a small built-in tank.

  • Member since
    June 2021
Posted by rocketman2000 on Monday, August 30, 2021 7:31 AM

I confirmed yesterday that the compressor i the problem. I took an airbrush into the garage and with the big noisy compressor it worked fine. So I will be shopping for a new compressor.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    February 2021
Posted by MJY65 on Monday, August 30, 2021 8:05 AM

How far is your hobby bench from the garage?  Is plumbing an air line an option?  Unlimited air and no noise indoors.

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Monday, August 30, 2021 2:36 PM

Or, continuing on MJY65's line, If possible, go with a air hose from the compressor to a volume tank (air tank) in the house. The volume tank reduces flow fluctuations and you can isolate it if needs be. You could also put your painting reducer on the volume tank and keep the compressor a full working pressure for other things (pneumatic tools, filling tires, etc.). So, no appreciable noise, accessable air and the ability to vary your pressure / flow as needed for the medium you are spraying. A complete win / win situation.

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Monday, August 30, 2021 2:57 PM

HooYah Deep Sea

Or, continuing on MJY65's line, If possible, go with a air hose from the compressor to a volume tank (air tank) in the house. The volume tank reduces flow fluctuations and you can isolate it if needs be. You could also put your painting reducer on the volume tank and keep the compressor a full working pressure for other things (pneumatic tools, filling tires, etc.). So, no appreciable noise, accessable air and the ability to vary your pressure / flow as needed for the medium you are spraying. A complete win / win situation.

 

We ran three bays worth of shops from a compressor room with no secondary tank. The spray booth was the middle room ( 1/1 I'm speaking about) The key is up the trunk line size so it can flow the volume needed, then downsize at a regulator near the tools that has a built in air dryer, in this case a little airbrush is the tool..

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Monday, August 30, 2021 3:02 PM

He doesn't need a secondary tank just a large enough trunk line from his garage compressor.

Edit: took out repeat text, didn't think the other message posted.

  • Member since
    June 2014
Posted by BrandonK on Monday, August 30, 2021 4:09 PM

I dont run a tank at all. I use this compressor.. https://www.amazon.com/Iwata-Medea-Studio-Sprint-Single-Compressor/dp/B000BQPNWS/ref=asc_df_B000BQPNWS/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309741918693&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=11110935021979491719&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9029483&hvtargid=pla-567389729882&psc=1

It will run my Iwata HP-CS at 30 psi If I wish, but I don't. And it runs my syphon feed Badger as well. It is nearly silent. A foot away and you can't hear it run. Worth every penny.

BK

Dream room complete!! BalloonsBeer

On the bench:Tamiya 1/48 Sea Harrier, Tamiya 1/35 M4A3E8 "Fury" with crew

On Deck: Accurate Minataures 1/48 P-51C "Boise Bee", Tamiya 1/48 F4U Birdcage

 

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Tuesday, August 31, 2021 7:39 AM

rocketman2000

I'm back to the idea that an air tank is no cheaper than a small compressor.  I will be taking my air brushes out to the garage today to test them with the compressor I have in garage.

 

 

That is my method of painting. I open the garage door, turn on two floor fans I have and paint away. I have a Campbell Housefeld 2hp 6 gallon wheeled compresor with regulator and water trap as my setup. Yes it’s very loud when it fills but can go a very looooong time before the pressure drops and it turns on again. 

I also use it to run air nailers, inflating tires and blowing off debris on parts etc.

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    June 2021
Posted by rocketman2000 on Wednesday, September 1, 2021 7:44 AM

Got the new compressor last night. Output thread is BSP instead of NPT, so had to order an adapter.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Wednesday, September 1, 2021 9:28 AM

rocketman2000

Got the new compressor last night. Output thread is BSP instead of NPT, so had to order an adapter.

 

 

What compressor did you buy if you don't mind ?

  • Member since
    June 2021
Posted by rocketman2000 on Saturday, September 4, 2021 8:53 AM

oldermodelguy

 

 
rocketman2000

Got the new compressor last night. Output thread is BSP instead of NPT, so had to order an adapter.

 

 

 

 

What compressor did you buy if you don't mind ?

 

It's a Vivo Home Mini Air Compressor TC-20.  Only thing I do not like about it is that it's regulator only regulates down to 40 psi.  I never airbrush above 20, so I had to add in series a good low pressure regulator.  I got my adapter to couple that second regulator, so I am now in business.  I found it was a bit of work running two regulators in series.  Turns out the two regulators have an effect on each other, so it took a bit of back and forth adjusting.

I like the new compressor.  It is very quiet- 47 db, and has an auto shutoff so it only runs when I am actually spraying.  It is a piston type, not a diaphram, so I hope it is a bit more reliable than the old one.  And, it runs at a lower rpm, so the pitch is less annoying even at the low db.

I have three kits started, and needing some airbrushing, so I have to get to work!

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Saturday, September 4, 2021 10:55 AM

Just crank your primary regulator up to somewhere near max, then you can regulate normally with your secondary. I actually prefer double regulators and getting the water separator out a few ft from the compressor.

  • Member since
    June 2021
Posted by rocketman2000 on Sunday, September 5, 2021 9:03 AM

oldermodelguy

Just crank your primary regulator up to somewhere near max, then you can regulate normally with your secondary. I actually prefer double regulators and getting the water separator out a few ft from the compressor.

 

I also  had to turn the second regulator almost all the way down.  But it works fine now, can dial in my normal pressures.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Sunday, September 5, 2021 12:05 PM

Just watch your pressure drop when spraying and adjust if need be. It's called working pressure ( with air flowing) vs static ( no air flowing). And excuse me, if you already know this stuff just disregard.

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