SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Painting photo etch details

778 views
6 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
dlh
  • Member since
    March 2017
  • From: Chambersburg, PA
Painting photo etch details
Posted by dlh on Tuesday, October 5, 2021 11:06 AM

I'm working on the 1/32 Apollo Command Module and Service module using New Ware detail sets.  I'm looking for a way to paint the details of the control panels

Panels will be gray semi gloss enamel.  Hoping for dark gray recesses with black buttons.  How do I paint the dark gray areas around the buttons?  These areas are, of course, recessed.  I need a sort of apply/wipe off technique bit can't seem to get that right.  If clear coating is involved, will I lose some of the crisp detail?

Thanks

Dave

 

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Wednesday, October 6, 2021 4:19 AM

Hello!

What you want to do shouldn't be very hard. Basically paint the whole part light gray, it might be a good idea to prime the part with something to help paint stick to the metal. Maybe just use Tamiya spray primer - maybe you will even find the colour right. For the recesses you need to apply a wash - special thin paint meant to flow into the recesses. If you apply it with a fine brush just touch the recessed area and the paint flows on itself and "floods" the recess and you're done. Or you could apply some thicker paint and then try to wipe off the excess - a Q-tip moistened with the right thinner would be the thing here. You just need to be sure the thinner doesn't attack the light gray paint. I have found that if you paint your surface with Humbrol enamel and let it dry for about a week, then you might wipe it with a Q-tip moistened in Gunze Color Thinner and the old Humbrol coat holds, whil the new layer of Humbrol applied, say, half an hour ago can be washed away.

Hope it helps, have a nice day

Paweł

PS. I have tried the technique described above here (panel lines):

1:72 EKA-3B Whale by Pawel

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Wednesday, October 6, 2021 6:29 AM

I'm thinking I would take all of the photoetched parts that you want to paint that way and put them on a scanner before any primer or paint go on them.  You could even leave the parts attached to the frets, so you don't lose any of them.  I would then use the scanned image to print masking patterns on a rice paper masking sheet, then cut out the outlines of the recesses.  Then, clean up the photo etched parts by lightly sanding both sides with a 320 grit sanding block, followed by a wipe-down with lacquer thinner.  Then I would airbrush on some Tamiya Grey Surface Primer, followed by the overall grey color you want to use.  Then put your masking patterns on all the parts and airbrush the dark grey color for the recesses.  When that paint has cured, you can use a black ultra fine point Sharpie and just touch some black ink onto each one of the buttons.  When you do that, it helps to have a pad of sticky notes or paper nearby to scribble on with the Sharpie.  That will get some ink flowing without your having to apply pressure to the buttons with the Sharpie.  The ink can dissolve the paint, so the pressure needs to be kept to a minimum when applying it.  As long as it is lightly dabbed on, it will dry without mixing with the paint.  You can do all of this without losing any fine detail as long as your primer and paint go on thin enough.  You want it to be going on thinly and lightly enough that, even on those small parts, it takes you several passes to get coverage.  Don't shoot clouds of paint from your airbrush, and definitely try to avoid using a rattle can for any of this.  I would have also recommended brushing on some Mr. Metal Primer before the Tamiya Grey Primer, but that would soften the detail.  The Tamiya just doesn't hold quite as well to the metal, but its good enough if you're careful with the parts, and it won't bury your details.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    June 2021
Posted by rocketman2000 on Wednesday, October 6, 2021 8:11 AM

I usually paint pe on fret.  The kit I am working now, however, has most of the pe butt joined to the plastic-that is, the pe piece is joined along an edge the thicness of the pc.  This makes cleanins the joint surfaces, painted plastic and painted pe, clean enough for a clean joint. I am going to try glueing unpainted pe to unpainted plastic, and paint assemblies later.

 

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

dlh
  • Member since
    March 2017
  • From: Chambersburg, PA
Posted by dlh on Wednesday, October 6, 2021 10:52 AM

Eaglecash867

I'm thinking I would take all of the photoetched parts that you want to paint that way and put them on a scanner before any primer or paint go on them.  You could even leave the parts attached to the frets, so you don't lose any of them.  I would then use the scanned image to print masking patterns on a rice paper masking sheet, then cut out the outlines of the recesses.  Then, clean up the photo etched parts by lightly sanding both sides with a 320 grit sanding block, followed by a wipe-down with lacquer thinner.  Then I would airbrush on some Tamiya Grey Surface Primer, followed by the overall grey color you want to use.  Then put your masking patterns on all the parts and airbrush the dark grey color for the recesses.  When that paint has cured, you can use a black ultra fine point Sharpie and just touch some black ink onto each one of the buttons.  When you do that, it helps to have a pad of sticky notes or paper nearby to scribble on with the Sharpie.  That will get some ink flowing without your having to apply pressure to the buttons with the Sharpie.  The ink can dissolve the paint, so the pressure needs to be kept to a minimum when applying it.  As long as it is lightly dabbed on, it will dry without mixing with the paint.  You can do all of this without losing any fine detail as long as your primer and paint go on thin enough.  You want it to be going on thinly and lightly enough that, even on those small parts, it takes you several passes to get coverage.  Don't shoot clouds of paint from your airbrush, and definitely try to avoid using a rattle can for any of this.  I would have also recommended brushing on some Mr. Metal Primer before the Tamiya Grey Primer, but that would soften the detail.  The Tamiya just doesn't hold quite as well to the metal, but its good enough if you're careful with the parts, and it won't bury your details.

 

Thanks for a detailed reply.  How do you print on rice paper masking sheet?  It's adhesive, right? So how does one get it to go through the printer?

This is a great idea that I can use in other situations.

Dave

dlh
  • Member since
    March 2017
  • From: Chambersburg, PA
Posted by dlh on Wednesday, October 6, 2021 10:55 AM

Pawel

Hello!

What you want to do shouldn't be very hard. Basically paint the whole part light gray, it might be a good idea to prime the part with something to help paint stick to the metal. Maybe just use Tamiya spray primer - maybe you will even find the colour right. For the recesses you need to apply a wash - special thin paint meant to flow into the recesses. If you apply it with a fine brush just touch the recessed area and the paint flows on itself and "floods" the recess and you're done. Or you could apply some thicker paint and then try to wipe off the excess - a Q-tip moistened with the right thinner would be the thing here. You just need to be sure the thinner doesn't attack the light gray paint. I have found that if you paint your surface with Humbrol enamel and let it dry for about a week, then you might wipe it with a Q-tip moistened in Gunze Color Thinner and the old Humbrol coat holds, whil the new layer of Humbrol applied, say, half an hour ago can be washed away.

Hope it helps, have a nice day

Paweł

PS. I have tried the technique described above here (panel lines):

1:72 EKA-3B Whale by Pawel

 

Thanks.  This seems like a fairly simple technique.  I have several brand of washes in gray to black colors.  I have the piece in the photo painted gray semi gloss.  Waiting for it to dry and cure, and I will practice.

Very helpful.

Dave

dlh
  • Member since
    March 2017
  • From: Chambersburg, PA
Posted by dlh on Wednesday, October 6, 2021 11:06 AM

Eaglecash867.

OK. Got it.  Found adhesive rice paper sheets with removable backing.

Thanks again

Dave

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS
FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.