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3D Printers?

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  • Member since
    August, 2012
3D Printers?
Posted by JMorgan on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 5:07 PM

How about doing an article on using these printers for FSM? The small and affordable ones would be best as well as how to use the filament material that makes the print (compatibility with paints, glues, etc.). How about it?

 

-Jeffrey Morgan

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Thursday, August 17, 2017 5:54 PM

JMorgan

How about doing an article on using these printers for FSM? The small and affordable ones would be best as well as how to use the filament material that makes the print (compatibility with paints, glues, etc.). How about it?

 

-Jeffrey Morgan

 

I like the idea. My two cents.

 

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Friday, August 25, 2017 10:53 AM

I would love to see such an article. 

I recently had some 1/144 deck guns done by Shapeways and was blown away by the 3D details, IMO superior to pe, resin or metal.

 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Friday, August 25, 2017 4:51 PM

Hello!

That's basically the trick here - Shapeways delivers very nice parts, and those "small and affordable machines" in most cases won't cut it. My conclusion from working with 3D printers was: learn to use 3D drawing programs and let the pros do the printing - this way you can optimally use your time and your money. Like my pops always says: You dont have to buy a brewery every time you'd like to get a dring of beer!

Thanks for reading and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Friday, August 25, 2017 8:37 PM

Pawel

Hello!

That's basically the trick here - Shapeways delivers very nice parts, and those "small and affordable machines" in most cases won't cut it. My conclusion from working with 3D printers was: learn to use 3D drawing programs and let the pros do the printing - this way you can optimally use your time and your money. Like my pops always says: You dont have to buy a brewery every time you'd like to get a dring of beer!

Thanks for reading and have a nice day

Paweł

 

 

Excellent point Pawel. I had the same though in mind.

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by PFJN on Tuesday, August 29, 2017 3:08 PM

Hi,

I suspect that experiences will be different for every modeler, but I have been experimenting with my 3D printer for use in model building for a while and have found it very useful.

In general, especially since my printer is a relatively low end model, I have been viewing mine more as a tool for helping me scratch build a model rather than as a tool to make exact scale replicas.  But since its my understanding that even with output from places like Shapeways you may still need to do a bit of "post processing" and clean up, I suspect that stuff from sites like that may fall at least a little bit into the category of being a "starting point for additional work" rather than an "ready to use end product" for many modelers anyway.

Anyway, here are a couple images for a new project that I started working on recently.  Here I have taken a 3D computer model for a "What-If" ship that I drew up on my computer and broken it into several smaller sections for printing, that I intend to "clean up", "join together", and then do some extra work on to make a ~1/300 scale model of my ship.

CAD File

Lower Hull Pieces

Other Pieces

In the images above you can see that everything did not come out perfect, and I'll need to do a little clean up, filing, sanding, and putty work (which I have already started on the two small lifeboats in the bottom picture), but the piec es have come out fairly well and there is a lot of detail in things like the mast, the built in inclined stairways in the stern section, etc.

In addition, I was also able to make the bulkheads around the open qurter deck fairly thin but still relatively strong.

By doing this on my own 3D printer I've been able to play around with different ideas on how to best break the ship up into smaller sections, and lay these sections out to try and minimize wastage and limit the areas where a lot of cleaning might otherwise be required, and in general make the parts for a relatively largish model (~10.5 x 2 x 2.5").  Specifically, I made the bow in two pieces, split along the centerline, so that I wouldn't have to print alot of temporary supports to help when printing the bow flare.

In addition the stern was made in several pieces for similar reasons.  For the mid section I was able to cut away alot of the interior of the piece leaving only a "mostly" solid shell and some internal cross bracing.  Since I've taken these images I've also printed out most of the focsle deck, with cut outs for the main windows as well.

Anyway, hopefully these images help show some of what can be accomplished even with a fairly basic 3D printer, and how you can either make a full model or just parts, for scratch building etc.

Pat

  • Member since
    August, 2012
Posted by JMorgan on Tuesday, August 29, 2017 3:43 PM

Interesting pics. How much was your "low end" printer? I never thought about piece-wise printing. What do you use to best join this material anyway?

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by PFJN on Tuesday, August 29, 2017 4:10 PM

Hi,

I'm using a Da Vinci XYZ 1.0, that I bought lightly used a few years back for about $400-450 off eBay.  I think now a days you can get the 2.0 for about $380 new from several stores or their Junitor model (which can do 5.9 x 5.9 x 5.9in prints vice the 7.9 x 7.9 x 7.9 capcity of their bigger models) for about $170 (at least based off a quick Google search).

Like I said the prints I get aren't perfect (you can see a bit of a flaw in the starboard side bow, the sides of the lifeboats didn't print out too well - so I've filled them in with putty, and on the mid section there was a small glitch the casued several layers to be offset in the top and bottom of the print), but the output is reasonably easy to file and sand and the plastic used bonds well with both Squadron Putty and Perfect Putty.

Instead of glue, based on a article I read a while back I use acetone (I think - I'll check when I get home) mixed with scrap pieces of the plastic to make a paste that bonds really well.

One of the neat things about printing in parts is that you can print some parts laying flat and others on their sides, in order to take advantage of the abilities of the machine and minimize visible layer etc.  I'm playing around with some different ideas for the deckhouse and windows right now.

Pat

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