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Using artists oil paint to simulate wood on plastic models

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  • Member since
    February, 2017
  • From: Pennsylvania, USA
Using artists oil paint to simulate wood on plastic models
Posted by oldkits on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 11:47 AM

Can someone suggest the colors of artists oils to use over a acrylic base to simulate wood on plastic ship models. I have seen former discussions on the revell kogge and pinta that were extreemly realistic, but have no idea as to the colors used. Your help and advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Ed

Tags: artists oils
  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Wednesday, March 01, 2017 10:45 PM

Welcome to the Forums, although I can't answer your question since I've never tried the technique.

 Nulla Rosa Sine Spina

 

 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by damouav on Thursday, March 02, 2017 1:44 AM

I came across this some time ago.

http://www.clubhyper.com/reference/woodgrainel_1.htm

 

On the Bench
1/48 Hasegawa Corsair AU-1 (F4U-6)
In the Que
1/48 Hobby Boss TBF-1C Avenger
1/48 Tamiya P-47-D Bubbletop
1/48 Hasegawa P51-D
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  • Member since
    February, 2017
  • From: Pennsylvania, USA
Posted by oldkits on Thursday, March 02, 2017 9:37 AM

Thank you for the information. It was what I was looking for. I will give it a try on my next model. The technique is simular to the old wood graining kits for furniture using oil based paint over acrylics. I will have to expriment with the different colors.

Thanks again

Ed

fox
  • Member since
    January, 2007
  • From: Coatesville, Pa.
Posted by fox on Thursday, March 02, 2017 3:11 PM

Welcome to the Forums! Glad to have you aboard!

Jim  Captain

Photobucket Main WIP: Rebuild of Monogram 1/8 "Big Deuce" with 1/8 Pocher V-12 in rear - 10%

   On the Bench:   Revell 1/48 Ju 52/3m - 50%;  Revell 1/96 USS Kearsarge - 20% 

I keep hitting "escape", but I'm still here.

  • Member since
    January, 2017
Posted by damouav on Saturday, March 04, 2017 5:31 AM

Happy to help

Damian

On the Bench
1/48 Hasegawa Corsair AU-1 (F4U-6)
In the Que
1/48 Hobby Boss TBF-1C Avenger
1/48 Tamiya P-47-D Bubbletop
1/48 Hasegawa P51-D
1/48 Roden S.E.5a
  • Member since
    November, 2016
Posted by Wyktor on Saturday, March 04, 2017 8:54 AM

I'm currently building a period ship and I've tried very simple technique using toothbrush with very good results (for a first timer). Have a look here: http://cs.finescale.com/fsm/modeling_subjects/f/7/t/174326.aspx

I'm going to do another piece of deck tomorrow so if you want I can capture it step by step and post it online.

  • Member since
    February, 2017
  • From: Pennsylvania, USA
Posted by oldkits on Saturday, March 04, 2017 9:58 AM

Your technique is very interesting. I would enjoy seeing future work.

Thanks very much

Ed

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Saturday, March 04, 2017 6:37 PM

It depends on what effect you are looking for. Dark grain or light? I do mine over a wood color acrylic base then use a contrasing oil paint for the woodgraining using a fan brush to get the desired effect.

On thir DR.1 prop I wanted a darker base and even a darker lamination.

For this old Aurora Guillotine I wanted a lighter base color and a medium contrasting grain.

Hope this helps. Double click on the image to get a good closeup.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, March 05, 2017 10:54 AM

I have a friend who paints sailing ship models (older ones like the Santa Maria and such) with regular varnish stains meant for wood.  I have not tried it myself, but they do look good on his.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November, 2016
Posted by Wyktor on Monday, March 06, 2017 4:48 AM

Hi, this is the promised step by step version of my process:

http://cs.finescale.com/fsm/modeling_subjects/f/7/p/174326/1941192.aspx#1941192

  • Member since
    February, 2017
  • From: Pennsylvania, USA
Posted by oldkits on Monday, March 06, 2017 11:31 AM

I have used this technique and it works fine, but not as easy in my opinion as using oil paints. Oil paints are translucent unless you put them on too thick then they are opaque. I have the guillotine model somewhere, but I build it in around 1965 and use pacta enamels back then.

Thanks for the update

Ed

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