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Read any good books lately?

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  • Member since
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  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Read any good books lately?
Posted by stikpusher on Tuesday, December 18, 2012 5:13 PM

Recently I finished two excellent reads- "1776" by McCllough, and "The Coldest Winter" by Halberstram.  Both are superb accounts of their respective parts of history. Currently I am reading "Wings of Gold" by Astor, and "The Guns of August" by Tuchman. Two more very enlightening books filling my mind. 

How about anybody else?

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

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Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, December 18, 2012 5:55 PM

A little while ago I read "Bury Us Upside Down" about the Misty pilots in Vietnam. Great book.

More recently "Race for the South Pole". Certainly I've read several books about Amundsen and Scott, but this one was a little different.

The structure is parallel diary entries, day by day, from Scott, Amundsen and his team member Olav Bjaaland (Amundsen tends to be terse) all the way down and back. This one really was a winner.

I hear that Damon and Affleck are making a movie. I would see that. Pretty tough on dogs...

Currently I am reading "Endurance".

  • Member since
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  • From: Northern New Jersey
Posted by Tojo72 on Tuesday, December 18, 2012 6:58 PM

I am currently reading Antony Beevor's "The Second World War" very good reading,made me aware of some things i didn't know.

Just finished "The Spanish Holocaust"By Paul Preston A real eye-opener about the Spanish Civil War,just some horrific details,I had no idea of the bloodshed.

 

Stik,Tuchman's book an oldie but a goodie,very insightful.

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  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Tuesday, December 18, 2012 8:10 PM

"Newton and the Counterfeiter: The Unknown Detective Career of the World's Greatest Scientist"

Sir Isaac Newton running the Royal Mint and busting counterfeiters, true story.

Also James Garner's autobiography

Greg

 

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."

 

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  • From: Austin, TX
Posted by DoogsATX on Tuesday, December 18, 2012 8:40 PM

Hugh Howey's "Wool" series...one of the most interesting things I've read in years, about the survivors of some past apocalypse living within a massive underground silo. Seriously fantastic...Howey's writing is evocative without slipping anywhere near pretentious.

"Theodore Rex" by Edmund Morris...absolutely excellent, in-depth look at TR's administration. Learned a lot I didn't know or that I knew but vaguely.

"Snow Crash" by Neal Stephenson. I'm a HUGE Stephenson fan and go back and forth as to whether Cryptonomicon or Anathem is my favorite novel, but I'd never taken in this classic "predicted the internet and virtual worlds and Google Earth" story before. Awesome, but somehow lesser in my mind than his more recent stuff.

gregbale

"Newton and the Counterfeiter: The Unknown Detective Career of the World's Greatest Scientist"

Sir Isaac Newton running the Royal Mint and busting counterfeiters, true story.

Neal Stephenson's Baroque Cycle features Newton extensively, particularly as head of the royal mint as he trues to bust one of the other characters for counterfeiting. Dense, but awesome.

On the Bench: 1/32 Trumpeter P-47 | 1/32 Hasegawa Bf 109G | 1/144 Eduard MiG-21MF x2

On Deck:  1/350 HMS Dreadnought

Blog/Completed Builds: doogsmodels.com

 

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  • From: State of Mississippi. State motto: Virtute et armis (By valor and arms)
Posted by mississippivol on Tuesday, December 18, 2012 9:18 PM

I've been reading about the H.M. Troopship Birkenhead, which sank off Point Danger in Africa. Tremendous account about the sacrifice of the British troops in deference to the safety of the women and children on board.

Glenn

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  • From: New Zealand
Posted by Scorpiomikey on Wednesday, December 19, 2012 3:23 PM

Im currently reading "Prospero Burns" by Dan Abnett. Its part of the warhammer 40k "Horus Heresy" series.

Storyline is an artefact hunter gets irritated with the beuracracy of the administratum so at the ripe old age of 80 he travels to the planet of Fenris, where the space wolves astartes make their home. While entering the atmosphere he gets shot down by a space wolf named Bear. After certain events on the ice planet hes taken in by the space wolves and "Repaired" given a younger faster harder body. He then goes to war with them as their Skjald (Rememberer, teller of stories)

Im up to the part where hes sitting with the oldest of the wolves of fenris, whos been hit with a power hammer and is leaking blood everywhere (Hes claims hes no dieing, healing just hurts) telling him of his friend murza who wielded the powers of the warp which is the only thing that frightens the wolves.

Im enjoying it immensely. Im about half way through.

"I am a leaf on the wind, watch how i soar"

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  • From: AandF in the Badger State
Posted by checkmateking02 on Wednesday, December 19, 2012 4:13 PM

"Finding the Few," by Andy Saunders.  It's about recovery efforts for the remains of Battle of Britain pilots, missing since 1940 in England.  For the most part, it's been done by amateurs and without the cooperation of the Ministry of Defense.  Very moving.

 Nulla Rosa Sine Spina

 

 

 

fox
  • Member since
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  • From: Coatesville, Pa.
Posted by fox on Wednesday, December 19, 2012 11:12 PM

"Deception in War" by Jon Latimer. Basicly about the use of camouflage, deceptive troop and armour movements, noise discipline and radio deception, etc. used from the time of the Trojan Horse to the Gulf War. Very good reading.

Jim Captain

Photobucket Main WIP: Rebuild of Monogram 1/8 "Big Deuce" with 1/8 Pocher V-12 in rear - 10%

   On the Bench:   Revell 1/48 Ju 52/3m - 50%;  Revell 1/96 USS Kearsarge - 20% 

I keep hitting "escape", but I'm still here.

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Posted by Buckeye on Thursday, December 20, 2012 11:35 AM

A Low Flying Pterodactyl by John Powers.  About his career in the Coast Guard flying both helo's and C-130's.

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Posted by RedCorvette on Friday, December 21, 2012 6:39 AM

The last book I read was The Secret Race by Tyler Hamilton which focused on the doping in professional cycling and Lance Armstrong's involvement in particular.  Outside of modeling my major hobby/interest is triathlons.  Very sad for me to read as a cycling fan.

Mark

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  • From: Tornado Alley
Posted by Echo139er on Friday, December 21, 2012 2:34 PM

Yes.  Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History

The best book I have read in a very long time and I read a lot.

fox
  • Member since
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  • From: Coatesville, Pa.
Posted by fox on Friday, December 21, 2012 4:01 PM

Echo139er, If you liked "Empire of the Summer Moon", try the books of Terry C. Johnston. IIRC there are 32 books in the series, all written about the same time period and all written about different tribes and their leaders. I have them all and read all of them. Great reading.

Jim Captain

Photobucket Main WIP: Rebuild of Monogram 1/8 "Big Deuce" with 1/8 Pocher V-12 in rear - 10%

   On the Bench:   Revell 1/48 Ju 52/3m - 50%;  Revell 1/96 USS Kearsarge - 20% 

I keep hitting "escape", but I'm still here.

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  • From: Co.Kerry, Ireland.
Posted by Est.1961 on Friday, December 21, 2012 5:04 PM

       Finished a book recently about "Tom Crean" a member of Scott's expidition to the South Pole.

        Reading "Forgotten voices" by Joshua Levine at the moment both good reads.

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  • From: Tornado Alley
Posted by Echo139er on Friday, December 21, 2012 6:18 PM

Cool.  The author sounds familiar.  I might have read some already.  I will take a look.  Thank you.

G-J
  • Member since
    July, 2012
Posted by G-J on Friday, December 21, 2012 7:58 PM

I'm in the middle of The Most Dangerous Enemy, by Stephen Bungay, about the Battle of Britain.  I remember reading a kids book way back in second grade on the battle, and figured it was about time to read a good comprehensive history.  It's absolutely a great read and I highly recommend it.

On the bench:  Tamyia Mosquito Mk. VI for the '44 group build.  Yes, still.

On deck: 

  • Member since
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  • From: Tornado Alley
Posted by Echo139er on Saturday, December 22, 2012 7:46 AM

Also not long ago,  I read Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption, by  Laura Hillenbrand.  The true story of Louis Zamperini.

This book of non-fiction is one of the best stories I have ever read. Louis’s story is so incredible that I found myself wondering how it could all be true.  His story keeps coming back to me. I find it amazing what the will to survive is capable of.

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  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Saturday, December 22, 2012 12:14 PM

Recently read "Low Level Hell" by Hugh L. Mills, Jr, which is an account of his time as a Loach scout pilot in Vietnam, with lots of Snake & Tadpole stories.  I thoroughly enjoyed it & although my eyes were already open to what these guys did, this book opened them slightly further......

I'm on the lookout for something decent from the Falklands campaign if anyone has any suggestions (already read Vulcan 607)?

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  • From: Pittsfield, IL USA
Posted by novembergray on Tuesday, January 01, 2013 4:13 PM

I read "German Boy" not too long ago. It was a great read about the dying days of the Third Reich and the early post war years.

Joe

It's not about how fast you get there or even where you're going. It's whether you enjoy the ride.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, January 02, 2013 2:35 PM

Over the Holiday I read "The Finish: The Killing of Osama Bin Laden"; by Mark Bowden.

Highly recommended, although since it was published last June, it's already out of date.

I plan to grab and read "No Easy Day" by "Mark Owen".  I was a little skeptical because of all the controversy surrounding it's publication, but I then downloaded and watched the interview he did for "60 Minutes" and was pretty impressed.

I ordered " Special Ops: Case Studies in Special Operations Warfare: Theory and Practice" by William H. McRaven, 1996 Presidio Press. It's eight case studies from Eban Emael to Entebbe, and was McRavens Thesis at Naval Post Graduate School. Really am looking forward to that.

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  • From: Surrey B.C. Canada
Posted by Subhuman1 on Wednesday, January 02, 2013 2:54 PM

Just about 200 pages into the "Rise and fall of the Third Reich" I can't recall the authors name off hand, but it is proving to be a very entertaining book.

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Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, January 02, 2013 4:39 PM

William Shirer. That's the first book I ever read abt the Third Reich, when it was published in the early sixties. Still one of the best IMO.

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  • From: Austin, TX
Posted by DoogsATX on Wednesday, January 02, 2013 4:52 PM

Just nabbed Shirer's book on Audible for $8...will be a good listen as I'm working on the Fw 190F-8 and Me 262A-1a/U4

On the Bench: 1/32 Trumpeter P-47 | 1/32 Hasegawa Bf 109G | 1/144 Eduard MiG-21MF x2

On Deck:  1/350 HMS Dreadnought

Blog/Completed Builds: doogsmodels.com

 

  • Member since
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  • From: Surrey B.C. Canada
Posted by Subhuman1 on Wednesday, January 02, 2013 5:53 PM

That's the guy, and yes it is an awesome book.

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  • From: Denver
Posted by tankboy51 on Wednesday, January 02, 2013 5:57 PM

Yes,  Star Trek Destiny, by David Mack. It's a compilation of a trilogy he wrote recently.  It is about the finial war of the Borg on the Federation, and the Klingon and Romulan worlds, in fact, pretty much every world in known space.  The Borg are not assimulating this time, they are exterminating.  In these novels, which involves pretty much everyone from the StarTrek universe, you learn the origin of the Borg and their purpose.  I found it a griping adventure and great on characters and action.  The ending may disturb some however, but it is true to Star Trek.   The author is quite know to Star Trek folks and had permission from those that be, to do this story. Not sure if is could be considered Canon, but it comes close.

Doug

Now I'm rereading "The Big E" for the 3rd time.  Of course it's about USS Enterprise CV 6 in WWII.

  • Member since
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  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Wednesday, January 02, 2013 11:59 PM
Oh I remember reading "The Big E" so long ago. I would love to read it again. I am about halfway thru "Wings of Gold" and "Guns of August". Both are absolutely splendidly written.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    January, 2003
  • From: Washington, DC
Posted by TomZ2 on Friday, January 04, 2013 4:23 PM


I’m reading A Genius for Deception by Nicholas Rankin.
Don’t be fooled by first impressions.

Tags: Camouflage

Occasional factual, grammatical, or spelling variations are inherent to this thesis and should not be considered as defects, as they enhance the individuality and character of this document.

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Posted by pyrman64 on Monday, January 07, 2013 9:22 AM
  • Killing Lincoln by Bill O'Reilly & Martin Dugard
  • Armored Thunderbolt by Steve Zaloga
  • Rangers at Dieppe (The first combat action of U.S. Army Rangers in World War II) by Jim DeFelice

Greg H

"There is many a boy here today who looks on war as all glory, but, boys, it is all hell." Gen. Wm T. Sherman (11 April 1880, Columbus, Ohio)

  • Member since
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  • From: New Zealand
Posted by Scorpiomikey on Monday, January 07, 2013 4:17 PM

Just picked up a copy of Helmet for my pillow by Robert Leckie.

"I am a leaf on the wind, watch how i soar"

Recite the litanies, fire up the Gellar field, a poo storm is coming Hmm 

My signature

Check out my blog here.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, January 07, 2013 4:49 PM

GMorrison

I ordered " Special Ops: Case Studies in Special Operations Warfare: Theory and Practice" by William H. McRaven, 1996 Presidio Press. It's eight case studies from Eban Emael to Entebbe, and was McRavens Thesis at Naval Post Graduate School. Really am looking forward to that.

I just finished this one. Very good analysis of success and failure. Very inspirational for modeling subjects too.

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