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a humbling moment

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  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
a humbling moment
Posted by stikpusher on Sunday, February 22, 2015 2:07 PM

The other day on one of my rides, (OPSEC wont let me say when but the astute can figure out where), I saw a DDG in port locally undergoing ammo upload or download. This morning while at breakfast, I ran the hull number to come up with her name, USS Benfold. Well that was a name I had not heard before compared to many other ships that I had come across (e.g. USS Thach), so I Googled the hull number and then the link to her namesake, a Medal of Honor recipient in the Korean War. Reading his citation truly is humbling and makes one realize what a "hero" really is...

For gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a Hospital Corpsman, attached to a company in the First Marine Division during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on September 5, 1952. When his company was subjected to heavy artillery and mortar barrages, followed by a determined assault during the hours of darkness by an enemy force estimated at battalion strength, HC3c. BENFOLD resolutely moved from position to position in the face of intense hostile fire, treating the wounded and lending words of encouragement. Leaving the protection of his sheltered position to treat the wounded when the platoon area in which he was working was attacked from both the front and the rear, he moved forward to an exposed ridge line where he observed two Marines in a large crater. As he approached the two men to determine their condition, an enemy soldier threw two grenades into the crater while two other enemy charged the position. Picking up a grenade in each hand, HC3c. BENFOLD leaped out of the crater and hurled himself against the onrushing hostile soldiers, pushing the grenades against their chests and killing both the attackers. Mortally wounded while carrying out this heroic act, HC3c. BENFOLD, by his great personal valor and resolute spirit of self-sacrifice in the face of almost certain death, was directly responsible for saving the lives of his two comrades. His exceptional courage reflects the highest credit upon himself and enhances the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for others.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    March 2009
  • From: Yorkville, IL
Posted by wolfhammer1 on Sunday, February 22, 2015 2:08 PM

Wow

John

  • Member since
    September 2005
  • From: Illinois: Hive of Scum and Villany
Posted by Sprue-ce Goose on Sunday, February 22, 2015 2:43 PM

Indeed it is very humbling to read of such bravery and sacrifice.

  • Member since
    March 2005
  • From: near Nashville, TN
Posted by TarnShip on Sunday, February 22, 2015 3:47 PM

That Corpsman is what I think of when I hear the word Hero.

We Jarheads pick on the Navy, and vice versa, but, if I am anywhere and I see a service ballcap, I always say hi or wave it we are walking. But, if I see a sailor, and he is a Corpsman, I stop and shake his hand and tell him that his drink is on me, if we are somewhere that I can do that. (even if it is just coffee at the rest area vending machine)

A heck of a lot of second and third generation Marines owe their very existence to someone described only as "and then the Corpsman hovered over me and patched me up", many times without ever knowing the Doc's name.

Oooo Rahhh, Doc. We should name more ships after those guys.

Rex

almost gone

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Sunday, February 22, 2015 4:23 PM

Exactly my friend. The rifleman is expected to fight the enemy in every manner possible, near or far, even bare handed if the situation occurs. More so for our elite troops, they are more highly trained and expected to do more as part of their job. But the medic... I think that is why his citation struck me so much a I read it and I felt compelled to share it.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September 2005
  • From: Illinois: Hive of Scum and Villany
Posted by Sprue-ce Goose on Sunday, February 22, 2015 7:16 PM

This is another individual I recall hearing about many years ago:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desmond_Doss

The thing I find so amazing is that so many individuals ( from my perspective ) have been able to not just find the courage to perform these acts once, but multiple times.

  • Member since
    August 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Tuesday, February 24, 2015 4:05 PM

AMEN : 

    The ship I was first stationed on was named for such a man .Anyone can probably Google the name OZBOURN - U.S.M.C., and the ship U.S.S. OZBOURN- D . D . 846 , and get the whole story . I think that is why our ship was so always squared away and ready to Kick you know what and take names later . It's called Esprit-De-Corp . To the Marines I give a hearty OOOH - RAAH

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