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Any camera collectors on board?

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  • Member since
    March, 2013
Any camera collectors on board?
Posted by patrick206 on Friday, September 15, 2017 6:18 PM

Hi all -

I'm just a hobby photographer, once in a while I get a lucky shot. Especially like collecting older cameras, favor the Rollei TLR's and Hasselblad for medium format. Current Rollei inventory is four, two D's, an E-2 and Rolleicord Vb. The Hasselblad is a 500CM.

For large format it's a Wisner 4X5 Classic Field, Schneider and Rodenstock lenses.

35mm Nikon F5 and F100, Leica M-6 TTL. Then an old favorite, Nagle Retina with Schneider Xenar 3.5. I'll put that old one up against any film camera for image quality, and it's nearly 60 years old.

For digital it's Nikon SLR's and a Canon G-16. Wish I had known long ago about the performance of the G series Canon's, love it.

I live in Oregon, plenty of places for landscape photos. But getting film work done now is about over locally, best they can do is process, then scan and print. Then I still end up with a digital print. I have to mail film to Seattle for process and print, they do it old school, film work all the way, with very good results. It's "Panda" in Seattle, color and B&W, recommended.

Anyway, just wondering if there are any other serious collectors here, would like to hear back if any.

Patrick 

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by M1ks on Friday, September 15, 2017 6:38 PM

Yes, but in 35mm.

I had a Bronica ETRS which was a lovely camera but I tend to wander and see what takes my fancy and like candid street photography which MF doesn't lend itself to.

The only MF camera I currently have is a Holga GCFN, (top of the range y'know, glass single element lens and all), ;)

I have:
Rollei 35
Rollei 35B
Rollei 35LED

Olympus XA
Olympus MJUII (Stylus epic I think in the US?)

Minox GT
Several Minox submini, A, B, C, LX, EC (Bond spy cameras)

Canon AT, (which I love and dropped a while ago and it's developed a shutter fault, very upsetting and hoping to repair it)
Canon Ace sureshot, (Simple P&S but a novel waist level finder and detachable remote)

I've had and sold on various others, (including the Minox GT I think as I don't recall seeing that one recently and it's not on the shelf with my others, hmmmm)

All of them get used, once in a while i'll dust one off, load a film and go and shoot with it, I develop my own, B&W and colour, (Surprisingly easy, no special equipment beyond the darkbag and loading tank) and scan them but archive the negs in case I ever want prints from them.

Digitally I use Canon though had a stint with a Fuji X30 which was a beautiful camera, just that I've used Canon for so long it's ingrained.

You can see how to's on developing your own colour film with a home kit and can even do it at room temp on my youtube channel here as well as a few detailed camera reviews.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=99J_YOWItjc&list=PLoJWYG0njom_FE3YYKyOFiH-OlJIEqlXw

Also, you should try caffenol, develop some film with coffee, it's lots of fun.

  • Member since
    July, 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Friday, September 15, 2017 6:58 PM

Dont really call myself a collector. 

I have used the same Chinon CM-3 since 1981.  Auto winder and tripod, 2 telephoto lenses ( 160mm and 180mm)  a regular lens (55mm) and a fisheye lens. I took a few photography classes in high school and This was the camera I  used. Its beat up a bit ( during my "depth of field" shoot I dropped it over 125 feet from the bridge I was on to the riverbed below....still works)( also survived my 2 year old daughter with a stapler back in 2000)  but took great pictures untill I retired it in 2012. It's just to hard to find anybody that still develops film. I used to send it to Seattle Film Works (you get a free roll of film with every roll you send in for development) but I got tired of waiting to see my pictures.

Target use to have a photo kiosk but no more. Found a few wedding photography shops here and there that would develop film for me, but I finally just gave up. I now ust a Vivitar Vivicam ($28 piece of crap)

I still have a bag of 22 rolls of film that needs to be developed.... I have NO idea whats on them (proof of Bigfoot?)

                      Dont worry about the thumbprint... paint it rust and call it "Battle damage" !

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Friday, September 15, 2017 8:25 PM

M1KS-

Thanks, nice gear you have/had. Never used the Minox, but friends really favor them. Same with Holga, can anything be more basic?

Rollei 35, elegant design, great glass. Would have liked one, but being married I figured I had pushed my luck as far as I dared. We both have Canon G-16's, she doesn't get why I need any others. Actually I don't, but I sure like having these things to play with and admire.

I used to have Olympus OM-1's, liked them so well I added the XA and the Epic. I liken the Epic to SLR quality lenses, but less then $100 new. Many years old, works as well as ever.

Thanks for the reply, nice to read.

Patrick

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Friday, September 15, 2017 8:29 PM

I'm just an old semi-retired photographer. I've developed so many rolls of film in my life that I'm glad it's over. I still love photography and it was a great career and way of life. I've shot all of the above mentioned, still have a nice 4x5 system unused for years. I'm not a collector but it has collected I must say. I'm a Nikon guy with almost everything, at least what I think I need. Wow, I wish I had then what I have now as far as problem solving. Insane ISOs and incredible resolution. I should mention post-processing, not cheating but fine tuning color correction and contrast. Most of the past problems of photography have been solved but alas now everyone is a photographer. Not all bad, now the masses can do decent photography.

Just raving on, I was a great career with all kinds of opportunities and adventures. I still shoot professionally and just turned 75. Not dead yet. Favorite shoots are wildlife/nature, motorsports and aircraft. Even fine art occasionally. It was and still is a great career even though times have changed. it's part of my soul.

Max or Max Good/Photographer.

 

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Friday, September 15, 2017 8:35 PM

Little Timmy -

Thanks, I know the name Chinon but never seen one. Must be a rugged bugger to withstand that treatment. Used Seattle Film Works years ago, but mostly Ivey Seright until they closed the doors. Now Panda takes care of my needs, they have my preferred printing ways down pat, I'm happy with their work. 

Only thing I miss is being able to go over the proof sheet, then lay out the framing and specify print contrast at the desk. But they usually get it right anyway.

BTW, the East Saquaro Park in Tucson is my favorite spot for photos.

Thanks again.

Patrick

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Friday, September 15, 2017 9:14 PM

Hodakamax -

You bet, cameras are now on a par with space travel, in terms of features and capability. With my Canon G-16 I shoot mostly in auto mode, or B&W, but the manual is a couple of hundred pages long. I'm 76, I really don't need to study up on the re-invention of the wheel, or get a degree regarding this little point and shoot. I like the images, but the complication I don't need.

I'm a retired commercial pilot, I found photogaphy in worldwide places to be very satisfying and truly enjoyable. Most of my layover trips only allowed for some sleep and a few hours for getting ready to launch, but some trips gave me up to 4 days until return. Then I could really hit the road and see some of the local countryside.

Inflight photos of Greenland, Iceland, the Arctic and Antarctic regions, gave folks at home a good representation of international travel. I must say, this long after retirement, (16 years,) I enjoy getting the old archives out and re-living those days. 

Like you I enjoy it all, landscapes, plantlife, airshows and museums. Amazing the things I missed while being there, later while looking at photos I see things that didn't register at the time.

Knowing the reaper is gaining ground more rapidly now, I have to decide when/how to lighten this load. No kids, wife is clueless about the collection, she's much younger than me, I vow I will not saddle her with the chore of getting it gone later.

Thanks Max.

Patrick 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Lowell City, Mars
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Friday, September 15, 2017 9:20 PM

I have a Canon AE-1 SLR with a long telephoto lens and other accessories.  I figured it was trash now, since it uses 35 mm film.  Hasn't been used for the last 20 years or so.  Is there any value to this, or should I just trash it?

Computer, did we bring batteries?.....Computer?

  • Member since
    July, 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Friday, September 15, 2017 9:34 PM

Cadet Chuck
 Is there any value to this, or should I just trash it?

NOOOOOOOOO!  At least put it on E-bay and take your chances !

Or sell it to a pawn shop for $50 and get a new kit.

                      Dont worry about the thumbprint... paint it rust and call it "Battle damage" !

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Friday, September 15, 2017 11:31 PM

Cadet Chuck

I have a Canon AE-1 SLR with a long telephoto lens and other accessories.  I figured it was trash now, since it uses 35 mm film.  Hasn't been used for the last 20 years or so.  Is there any value to this, or should I just trash it?

 

Chuck-

I have known of two folks with AE-1's, regarded as a really good camera. Don't trash it, remove the batteries if they were left in, make sure they didn't leak which can ruin electronics.

Try a Craigs list ad, there are still folks out there that prefer film, and several schools that offer photography classes want them for the students. My Olympus OM-1's were donated to a high school with photo classes, they were glad to have them.

The Canon optics are really good, if the camera is operable I imagine it still has value.

Patrick

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, September 15, 2017 11:49 PM

Not any more.

I had a really nice Nikkormat with a Zeiss 50 mm lense back in the 70's. Newspaper photographers camera. Curse the day I sold it.

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, September 16, 2017 9:14 AM

I have two AE1 bodies sleeping in the closet. Loved the camera. Not sure what to do with them. I hate to part with them but I never use em.

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, September 16, 2017 10:04 AM

Yep, we admit to being camera collectors.  Didn't mean to, we just never got rid of cameras after we'd buy new ones.  Then, when my father-in-law died, we inherited his old collection of cameras and other photo gear.

Collection starts with a couple of view cameras (Century camera) from first decade of 20th century, an 8 x 10 and two 5 x 7.  Then, an old Leica, so old it was pre-rangefinder.  Then, a handful of our own film SLRs and compacts.  We ended up finally selling many of our cameras, but kept the old view cameras, the old Leica, my old (first camera) Spartaflex and wifes first Kodak box camera.  Also kept my first digital, a Kodak DC-120.  We intend to build a display case, primarily for the old view cams and the Leica, if we ever get around to it.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Saturday, September 16, 2017 10:23 AM

The digital change-over happend quicker than most photographers thought it would and we were caught with a bunch of obsolete equipment. Fortunately for the 35 guys our lenses usually worked and I still use some lenses decades old today. The Nikon 16mm fisheye and the Nikon 35mm PC come to mind. Incredible lenses even by todays standards. 

As for 120 roll film, the main workhorse of the time, we all took a big hit as the 35 based digital became the new workhorse with ease of handling, equal if not better quality and giant lens selections. I ended up trading 3 Mamiya system bodies and 8 pro lenses for one new D7000 nikon body. My 3 lens 4x5 system just sets there, really no match against the Nikon D3x and battery of lenses and all the other pluses.

No sour grapes here, the obsolete now provided me with a good living at the time. A cabinet in my living room houses my remaining favorites, mostly old Nikon F2 and F3s with motors and such. I even still have the family Kodak box camera that Mom handed me while in grade school to take my first photo. People ask what the klunky 4x5 thing is. Times change. The time of film has passed. The cameras have no value other than collection with millions of examples on the market. 

There is an overseas market of film cameras in third world countries but the market is flooded. KEH Camera is a buyer of such things but prices are rock bottom.

Ok, my humble opinion for the day. Shoot 'em up!

Max

  • Member since
    March, 2015
  • From: Streetsboro, Ohio
Posted by Toshi on Saturday, September 16, 2017 11:29 AM

I used to be a collector when I was in my teens/early 20's living in Europe.  I stopped and sold everything as I started a family.  My daughter Allana went to Kent State to major in photography.

She was angry (Dad, why did you sell them?  My answer?  I started a family.  lol!) when I told her I had an old 3G Leica and several turn of the century colloidion method glass cameras, she freaked out.  

She's now a professional photographer and has a neat little collection of cameras that I helped her collect.  Here are some pics of her modest collection.  The Cannon Mark III is her pro equipment camera.  She has several thousands of dollars invested in Cannon lenses. 

Toshi

https://www.flickr.com/photos/151399853@N05/shares/114tjc

 

 

Retired due to work related injury

Married to the most caring, loving, understanding, and beautiful wife in the world.  Mrs. Toshi

 

On the bench

Monogram 1/48 Black Widow 1974 boxing with AM Goodies

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Saturday, September 16, 2017 1:37 PM

Thanks to all for responding, interesting and a fun read.

Hodakamax - You bet, digital swept through the photography world like a storm, not a complaint, but I attribute it somewhat to the "instant gratification" side of users. I like digital in some ways, speed of results and convenience mainly, but still feel strongly that digital can't fully compete with film, when a perfect exposure and print is accomplished. (Not often for me.) ):>(

A really good 120 or 4X5 B&W print just pops for me, while both digital and film have their own strong points and there is surely a place for both, I still have a marked preference for film and the larger formats. 

I'm seeing a return of film enthusiasm, although not on a grand scale, and there is hope that it will continue, with enough use to have a few of the businesses interested in keeping the doors open.

Toshi - I hope your daughter does very well and enjoys much success in her photography career.

Don S. - A display case is a nice thing to have, and it's fun just to admire the old school craftsmanship that created these beautiful cameras. My wife commisioned an oak and glass multi level case for my collection, one of my favorite household items. I spend some very pleasant moments just looking at the old cameras that I enjoy so much.

Bill - Letting go of the Nikkormat must be regretted, lovely equipment and great performers. My old F-100 and F-5 with ED lenses turn out some good images,(when I've done my part right,) and the fixed 24mm ED lens is my most often used. 

Thanks for taking the time everyone, I enjoyed seeing what you like and use.

Patrick

  • Member since
    July, 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Saturday, September 16, 2017 2:10 PM

patrick206
I know the name Chinon but never seen one. Must be a rugged bugger to withstand that treatment.

 

Belive it or not I'm STILL pulling staples ot of it.....17 years after the daughter/ stapler incident!

It's odd to use a camera to take pictures of a camera. Sorry about the focus..... I'm way better with real film.

Please excuse the dust....... its been in storage for a while.

                      Dont worry about the thumbprint... paint it rust and call it "Battle damage" !

  • Member since
    May, 2016
Posted by Raulduke on Saturday, September 16, 2017 2:54 PM

Not a serious collector at all. I have an old Pentax k 1000 and a newer nikon digitatal . I've always had a desire for a dark room. Are the chemicals and paper still available?

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Saturday, September 16, 2017 3:06 PM

Timmy -

Zowee, that camera has seen some rugged duty. They must be built tough, and it still works, that's a testimonial.

Several years ago a friends wife gave me his collection of Konica's when he passed, a couple of "T" bodies and a whole slug of Hexanon lenses. The bodies were so - so, but those lenses were SHARP.

He was meticulous about care and handling, the gear was in perfect condition. I sent it all to a Konica specialist for inspection and service, he asked if I wanted the gear to be scuffed up so it didn't look like brand new. What the heck?????

I called and he suggested many of his clients had him rough up the exterior edges, down to the brass and other metals, since they didn't want to look like noobies when others would see the new gear. Your Chinon would make you appear very well seasoned.

Thanks for the photos, I'm glad you hung onto it.

Patrick

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Saturday, September 16, 2017 3:28 PM

Raulduke

Not a serious collector at all. I have an old Pentax k 1000 and a newer nikon digitatal . I've always had a desire for a dark room. Are the chemicals and paper still available?

 

Raulduke -

I imagine so, B&H still sends me their huge catalogue and I see all kinds of processing equipment in it. The chemicals might be more of a challenge now, regarding disposal.

Years ago I tried some B&W processing, but I couldn't approach the perfection of a custom lab. I just pay the money and they do it. I only have a few prints done each year, that's surely less expensive than doing my own darkroom work.

I have a wife that insists on saving the world from everything, I have become accustomed to sleeping under a roof, if she saw those chemicals that would end. (;>)

Patrick

 

  • Member since
    July, 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Saturday, September 16, 2017 3:53 PM

patrick206
Zowee, that camera has seen some rugged duty. They must be built tough, and it still works, that's a testimonial.

I bought the camera, tripod,4 lenses,hot shoe flash,remote timer cable,autowinder and cases for all of it all back in 1981 .It was used when I got it from a pawn shop ,paid $400.

I dont know exactly how old it is but I'v had/used it for 36 years.

yes it's TOUGH!!! The drop off the brige did no damage whatsoever! ( just some mud from the river bottom that washed right off) I wached in HORROR as it bounced of a pile of jagged rocks just before it's swim. The film in it survived too.

                      Dont worry about the thumbprint... paint it rust and call it "Battle damage" !

  • Member since
    March, 2015
  • From: Streetsboro, Ohio
Posted by Toshi on Sunday, September 17, 2017 9:18 AM

Ah, I forgot to add.  I utilize iPhones for my photography.  I currently own the iPhone 7plus.  Compared to digital cameras 10 years ago, this thing is amazing.  I have a collection of iPhones that are still 100% functional. iPhone 1 that I use as a iPod.  iPhone 2 that is stored and a 4s that's used to transfer songs.  

All iPhones can take photos, emails, and are wi-if.  Albiet slow compared to my 7plus.  So I'm somewhat of a iPhone camera collector as I would like to get every iPhone ever made which isn't much at all.  lol

Toshi

 

 

Retired due to work related injury

Married to the most caring, loving, understanding, and beautiful wife in the world.  Mrs. Toshi

 

On the bench

Monogram 1/48 Black Widow 1974 boxing with AM Goodies

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: 37deg 40.13' N 95deg 29.10'W
Posted by scottrc on Sunday, September 17, 2017 11:17 AM

I just came back from spending a few weeks with my mom and saw this thread.  She had a commercial art studio and publishing house for years and both my myself and my dad did a lot of shooting and processing for the business.  He got into serious camera collecting in the late 70's.  About 90% of the collection was aquired through garage sales, flea markets, and a number of pawn shops that seemed to be happy to practically give the camera away. 

He passed away in 2013 and I have been inventoring his colletion of about 400 cameras. He had just about everything; Brownies, 110 instamatics, 126's, 4X5 twins, 35mm, Polaroids, The most valuable, and interesting part of the collection, are the sub-minatures, many of which are actual spy cameras from the early 1930s through the cold war.  What is interesting is that many of these little cameras had film cartridges the size of a watch battery.

Others are small cameras that were given away for promotions.  I have one pinhole camera that is the size of matchbox, that is still in the original mailing package, that was sent to lady in 1926 for buying a term life insurance policy.  

Camera's, like just about anything else, do have a pretty large market for collecting depending on age, make, and condition. I can say this, don't just throw one out.  Camera collecting in growing in popularity.  My dad mentioned many times that in the last years of his collecting, is was getting next to impossible to find "cheap" old cameras.  

I too have a good collection of Nikons that were our working cameras. F, FG, FM, and FM2s.  Been looking at getting a digital converter back for the FM2, but cost and performance has seemed to been a drawback.  Still, those bodies seem to be holding values over $100.  I did aquire a D7200 that I started to use.  

Mom, at 82, still works, but the whole studio now is in a bedroom and consists of four computers with full Adobe and Coral suites, a Wacom digital drawing board with a huge collection of pens, brushes, and even an airbrush, and a number of high end printers that can reproduce a complete oil painting.  Digital technology been a blessing for the working artist and photographer.  

Scott

        

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Sunday, September 17, 2017 1:56 PM

Scott -

400 cameras must take up a lot of space, at it's largest my collection went a few over 40, now down to 14. The spy cameras sound fascinating, I know their miniaturization was considered quite a feat, especially in those times.

Being old and not interested much in newer anything technology, still I find digital to have distinct advantages, but few that appeal to me. So I just stick to the old Rollei and Leica cameras.

From time to time I have considered a digital back for my Hasselblad, but they are $10K and while film is still available I'll just ride out the hobby with what I have.

I'd love to see your collection, bet there would be many cameras I've never heard of.

Thanks for the reply.

Patrick

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: 37deg 40.13' N 95deg 29.10'W
Posted by scottrc on Monday, September 18, 2017 12:57 PM

Ah dang, I meant 100, not 400!!!  I dumb fingered and didn't catch it.  Still, they take up pretty much the whole basement.  

        

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Hatboro, PA
Posted by Justinryan215 on Monday, September 25, 2017 4:41 PM

I'm a collector by no means....but my grandmother gave me my grandfather's Vito II rangefinder, and a couple of people have given me 60's Era polaroid  cameras, and my little brother gave me an 80's Era polaroid for Christmas last year.

 

I have used all of them, and they all work wonderfully!  

 

My everyday use camera is a "vintage" Canon T1i with a yuongnuo battery grip and 7d kit lens 15-85 mm...

"...failure to do anything because someone else can do better makes us rather dull and lazy..."

Mortal as I am,I know that I am born for a day.  But when I follow at my pleasure the serried multitude of the stars in their circular course, my feet no longer touch the Earth...

 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Monday, September 25, 2017 6:02 PM

Not on purpose, no.

But I'm too lazy or stupid to ever sell anything, so I have a 'collection' I guess, sort of.

Oh how I yearn for Dad's Kodak 35mm rangefinder and my original SLR, an Asahi Pentax bought in Geneva. The two I wish I did have I don't have. Go figure.

PS, I just saw B&H mentioned above. I was in NYC earlier in Sept and had a chance to visit. What a hoot. The place pretty much defies words. I wasn't the only person there standing with dropped jaw and a goofy expression.

-Greg

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, September 26, 2017 8:48 AM

Greg

Not on purpose, no.

But I'm too lazy or stupid to ever sell anything, so I have a 'collection' I guess, sort of.

Oh how I yearn for Dad's Kodak 35mm rangefinder and my original SLR, an Asahi Pentax bought in Geneva. The two I wish I did have I don't have. Go figure.

PS, I just saw B&H mentioned above. I was in NYC earlier in Sept and had a chance to visit. What a hoot. The place pretty much defies words. I wasn't the only person there standing with dropped jaw and a goofy expression.

 

I foundly remember the Pentax K1000.  Had one, inherited, gave it to one of our kids. Those cameras remind me of old Grumman aircraft, bulletproof and strong as steel.  That Pentax would work in freezing or even zero weather, when none of our other cameras would.  Simple to operate, great beginner's camera.  I recommended it to several friends getting started in photography.

 

 

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    May, 2016
Posted by Raulduke on Tuesday, September 26, 2017 9:30 AM

Don Stauffer

 

 
Greg

Not on purpose, no.

But I'm too lazy or stupid to ever sell anything, so I have a 'collection' I guess, sort of.

Oh how I yearn for Dad's Kodak 35mm rangefinder and my original SLR, an Asahi Pentax bought in Geneva. The two I wish I did have I don't have. Go figure.

PS, I just saw B&H mentioned above. I was in NYC earlier in Sept and had a chance to visit. What a hoot. The place pretty much defies words. I wasn't the only person there standing with dropped jaw and a goofy expression.

 

 

 

I foundly remember the Pentax K1000.  Had one, inherited, gave it to one of our kids. Those cameras remind me of old Grumman aircraft, bulletproof and strong as steel.  That Pentax would work in freezing or even zero weather, when none of our other cameras would.  Simple to operate, great beginner's camera.  I recommended it to several friends getting started in photography.

 

 

 

 

I bought that camera when I was about twenty. Now I'm sixty. Momma don't take my Kodachrome away

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