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I've Got The Modeling Shakes......

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  • Member since
    March, 2005
  • From: Lancaster, South Carolina
I've Got The Modeling Shakes......
Posted by Devil Dawg on Saturday, October 14, 2017 10:32 PM

How many of you out there in modeling land shake quite a bit when you attempt something that involves small, tiny parts, or try to brush-paint a small area? I'm getting to where I shake more than I think I should when doing these things, but the doc says it ain't anything to worry about (my opinion is different).

Anyways, what do y'all do to overcome this? I try to rest my holding hand (usually my left hand) against something immovable while using my right hand to manipulate whatever it is I'm using (paint brush; the other part to be attached; applying glue; etc...), and resting the right hand against something steady, too, while doing whatever it is that I'm doing. But, it's reaching the point where this isn't working so well, either. I'm only 53, and I shouldn't be shaking this much (again, my opinion). Luckily, my job hasn't begun to suffer from this.......yet.

Gary

 

Devil Dawg

On The Bench: Travel 1/48th Hasegawa A-7 Corsair II;  Travel 1/48th Hasegawa F/A-18F Super Hornet;  Travel 1/48th Eduard/Hasegawa Ultimate Sabre with "MiG Mad Marine" markings;

Build one at a time? Hah! That'll be the day!!

  • Member since
    July, 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Saturday, October 14, 2017 10:50 PM

I'm right handed so obviosly that's the "painting hand"

What I do is extend my pinky and rest it on the workbench. It helps.

I'm also a  smoker (I know... I know.... I have been cutting back lately. I'm down to 6 or 7 a day.  Unless I'm in a bar...... then I smoke a pack in an hour...... and come home with my  vocal cord's feeling like hamburger!) So sometimes when I'm about to paint i smoke to lessen the hand tremmer's.

I DO NOT RECOMMEND  A N Y B O D Y  STARTING SMOKING JUST TO EASE HAND TREMBLING !!!!!    ( or for any other reason !!! )

Trembling DOES come in handy for wethering ( just load up the brush with Rust and "twitch" away!

                      Dont worry about the thumbprint... paint it rust and call it "Battle damage" !

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Saturday, October 14, 2017 10:58 PM

I am something of a coffee fiend at times, and when I have more than I should before a bench session, the shakes show up. I counter them by placing my hand against the work bench or some other non moving surface to steady my control.

Also deep slow breathing can reduce the shaking as well. 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by Retired In Kalifornia on Saturday, October 14, 2017 11:26 PM

Devil Dawg

How many of you out there in modeling land shake quite a bit when you attempt something that involves small, tiny parts, or try to brush-paint a small area? I'm getting to where I shake more than I think I should when doing these things, but the doc says it ain't anything to worry about (my opinion is different).

Anyways, what do y'all do to overcome this? I try to rest my holding hand (usually my left hand) against something immovable while using my right hand to manipulate whatever it is I'm using (paint brush; the other part to be attached; applying glue; etc...), and resting the right hand against something steady, too, while doing whatever it is that I'm doing. But, it's reaching the point where this isn't working so well, either. I'm only 53, and I shouldn't be shaking this much (again, my opinion). Luckily, my job hasn't begun to suffer from this.......yet.

Gary

See another doctor, get 2nd opinion! Caffeine gives me the shakes, stay away from it whenever modeling sugary foods as well. I'm inching towards 70, worry lot over tripping when hauling stuff upstairs; eyesight still very good, do better modeling at night whenever am alert enough to do so.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, October 14, 2017 11:46 PM

We all shoot, right?

To me, it's the same. At least when I have my M14 out at 100 yards or the 7mm bolt rifle.

Look, relax, exhale, fire. Old friend of mine, Gunny; taught me to remember the shot. One max every minute. Sit there and think about it.

I find that I control the shakes best when I know what I want to do ahead of time.

I model incredibly slowly, but I trust my action ahead of time.

I know that makes no sense.

 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Saturday, October 14, 2017 11:57 PM

It made sense to me

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    December, 2015
  • From: providence ,r.i.
Posted by templar1099 on Sunday, October 15, 2017 5:33 AM

stikpusher
Also deep slow breathing can reduce the shaking as well.


Extend this process to all things. Master your breath and you master your mind,the body will follow.

"le plaisir delicieux et toujours nouveau d'une occupation inutile"

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Sunday, October 15, 2017 9:48 AM

Yes to about everything said above.

Plus I'd like to add that I fine mine starts when I've been "working" perhaps a bit too long and almost too focused. And, as you say, it's always something small and finicky.

My 2 cents is to walk away for a bit, get away from the bench.

It is nice to know I'm not the only one.

-Greg

  • Member since
    March, 2017
  • From: Mid Michigan
Posted by shamoo on Sunday, October 15, 2017 10:25 AM

I'm 53 as well and I find the same thing.  Doctor says my problem is mostly the Albuterol I have to use for my COPD.  Besides resting my hands as described above,  I have found that using a breathing technique I was taught in therapy called "pursed lip breathing."  This is basically inhaling calmly through the nose, then exhaling through the mouth with your lips tightly pursed as if whistling, so you can actually feel some back pressure in your chest.  Try to take at least twice as long to exhale as it took to inhale, but the longer the better.  I use this to control shortness of breath, and seems to help calm my shaky fingers down before I start painting, etc..  Might be worth a try, anyway.

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Griffin25 on Sunday, October 15, 2017 10:50 AM

 When I bear down and really concentrate on a hard to fit part or a really intracit paint job I get shaky right at the most critical time. I suffer from task specific Focal Dystonia in my right hand. It sucks. Perhaps you have a touch of that. Stress makes it much worse. I had to quit playing golf and get by in tennis with a rediculously extreme western grip. I actually have an appointment to go see someone in the next couple weeks. It only took me 25 years this is the first time I'm actually going to do something about it. I read that Parkinson medications or even Botox is a treatment. We'll see. Google  focal dystonia. Get a second opinion for sure.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, October 15, 2017 11:46 AM

When I am doing fine work, like fine painting or tweezer work, I try to keep both hands supported and connected to the same support.  Sometimes I will put a box down on the bench top, with my left hand resting on the box and the paint brush or tweezer in the left hand, also resting on the box.

If that is not pratical, or when the model is sitting on benchtop itself, I will place left hand on bench near where I am working on model, making a fist, and have right hand resting on left, or forearm near wrist, resting on the left hand fist.

I try to make all the motion with the right hand and fingers.  I never to any fine work with neither right wrist area nor elbow supported by workbench.  Sometimes both forearm/wrists resting on work benchtop, model or piece to be worked on in left, tool or brush in right.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

fox
  • Member since
    January, 2007
  • From: Coatesville, Pa.
Posted by fox on Sunday, October 15, 2017 12:21 PM

I'm 77 and afflicted with the same problems. For years I shrugged it off by saying that every time I'm working on the bench that da** freight train comes rumbling under the bench. The doc says it's partly old age and partly the result of having a graft in my right arm tieing the artery and veins together when I was on dialysis before the transplant. If you touch any part of either hand or arm you can feel my pulse and watch it as the veins jump up and down. Had to give up bowling, and tennis as docs are afraid that shocks to the arm might cause a blood clot resulting in all kinds of terrible things. Resting the hands on the bench while working seemed to do the trick for quite a while but I guess I'm getting used to it and it is slowly coming back. The breathing idea sounds good. I'll have to give it a try. Thanks, anything that keeps me building is great.

Jim  Captain

Photobucket Main WIP: Rebuild of Monogram 1/8 "Big Deuce" with 1/8 Pocher V-12 in rear - 10%

   On the Bench:   Revell 1/48 Ju 52/3m - 50%;  Revell 1/96 USS Kearsarge - 20% 

I keep hitting "escape", but I'm still here.

  • Member since
    January, 2016
  • From: Columbia Falls, Montana
Posted by Hunter on Sunday, October 15, 2017 6:41 PM

stikpusher

I am something of a coffee fiend at times, and when I have more than I should before a bench session, the shakes show up. I counter them by placing my hand against the work bench or some other non moving surface to steady my control.

Also deep slow breathing can reduce the shaking as well. 

 

LOL...I'm with you Stik, I love my coffee and if I drink too much my paint lines look like a EKG reading off the charts. Huh?

Hunter 

      

  • Member since
    March, 2015
  • From: Streetsboro, Ohio
Posted by Toshi on Monday, October 16, 2017 2:46 AM

My problem is backwards.  I had terrible shakes three years ago.  So I took up modeling to use as a therapeutic technique.  I just kept modeling and now my shakes are almost gone.  Breathing (Pranayama) helps a lot.  Yoga helps Me as well.

Toshi

 

Retired due to work related injury

Married to the most caring, loving, understanding, and beautiful wife in the world.  Mrs. Toshi

 

ON THE BENCH:

Revell B-17G Flying Fortress 

NEXT BUILD:

Mrs. Toshi just purchased for me a Tamiya 1/48 Ki-61 via eBay, when it arrives, as always, I’ll do a WIP.  Thanks to M.Brindos and Model Maniac for the heads up and the inspiration in obtaining this kit for my next build.

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Monday, October 16, 2017 9:19 AM

Gary

Do you freak out when doing this type of detail work? Sometimes one is so concerned about not shaking or moving and it happens cuz one tries so hard not too.

If you are a coffee drinker the cafeene will have an effect. I know my blood pressure goes up a couple of numbers after a cup. 

My hands rarely shake but it's always good to support it to get better results.

I always say that the best doctor is oneself and if you feel something is not right then get a second opinion just for your own peace of mind.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Monday, October 16, 2017 9:45 AM

Gary ;

    First and foremost , what brand of coffee or tea do you drink? Change that . Remember I consume a pot or more of Marine grade coffee a day . No Shakes . I recommend as far as tea to switch to Earl grey .It has a hint of Bergamot and a fine flavor .

   Now as to coffee, The Colombians have me hooked ! I just love the dark roast Colombian from Folgers ! Also , I find if you have a sharp workbench on which you prop your arms can do this to you .You are to young to be shakin . Do you Imbibe .Change brands  , I did and it helped . I now like or need less of  "Devils Cut " as far as that goes .My fave has always been Couvosier in two fingered glasses at room temp .

 Now there is another reason .You have gotten high on your glue and the wonderful smell of plastic .More ventilation Young Man !!! LOL.LOL. You'll get the hang of thangs .T.B. 

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Monday, October 16, 2017 6:23 PM

Beer.

Prost!

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • Member since
    July, 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Monday, October 16, 2017 8:37 PM

Having "The Twitchie's" does come in handy when you need to mix paint in a rattlecan.

                      Dont worry about the thumbprint... paint it rust and call it "Battle damage" !

  • Member since
    March, 2005
  • From: Lancaster, South Carolina
Posted by Devil Dawg on Monday, October 16, 2017 9:22 PM

stikpusher

I am something of a coffee fiend at times, and when I have more than I should before a bench session, the shakes show up. I counter them by placing my hand against the work bench or some other non moving surface to steady my control.

Also deep slow breathing can reduce the shaking as well. 

 
Wish I could blame it on caffeine, stik, but I usually drink a couple of normal-sized cups (12oz) of coffee in the morning after breakfast, then maybe a couple of Cokes during the day, but that's about it. I usually don't model until late at night, so I would figure the caffeine would be worn off by then. I don;t notice the shakes at all unless I'm doing work that requires small minute (my-nute!) movements. Don't notice it when I'm strumming on the git-fiddles, either. As others have said, it does come handy for mixing my paints...... 

Devil Dawg

On The Bench: Travel 1/48th Hasegawa A-7 Corsair II;  Travel 1/48th Hasegawa F/A-18F Super Hornet;  Travel 1/48th Eduard/Hasegawa Ultimate Sabre with "MiG Mad Marine" markings;

Build one at a time? Hah! That'll be the day!!

  • Member since
    March, 2005
  • From: Lancaster, South Carolina
Posted by Devil Dawg on Monday, October 16, 2017 9:24 PM

Retired In Kalifornia

 

 
Devil Dawg

How many of you out there in modeling land shake quite a bit when you attempt something that involves small, tiny parts, or try to brush-paint a small area? I'm getting to where I shake more than I think I should when doing these things, but the doc says it ain't anything to worry about (my opinion is different).

Anyways, what do y'all do to overcome this? I try to rest my holding hand (usually my left hand) against something immovable while using my right hand to manipulate whatever it is I'm using (paint brush; the other part to be attached; applying glue; etc...), and resting the right hand against something steady, too, while doing whatever it is that I'm doing. But, it's reaching the point where this isn't working so well, either. I'm only 53, and I shouldn't be shaking this much (again, my opinion). Luckily, my job hasn't begun to suffer from this.......yet.

Gary

 

See another doctor, get 2nd opinion! Caffeine gives me the shakes, stay away from it whenever modeling sugary foods as well. I'm inching towards 70, worry lot over tripping when hauling stuff upstairs; eyesight still very good, do better modeling at night whenever am alert enough to do so.

Unfortunately (for me, anyways!), more than one doctor has already told me this. And I never try to model sugary foods! Big Smile Propeller

 

Devil Dawg

On The Bench: Travel 1/48th Hasegawa A-7 Corsair II;  Travel 1/48th Hasegawa F/A-18F Super Hornet;  Travel 1/48th Eduard/Hasegawa Ultimate Sabre with "MiG Mad Marine" markings;

Build one at a time? Hah! That'll be the day!!

  • Member since
    March, 2005
  • From: Lancaster, South Carolina
Posted by Devil Dawg on Monday, October 16, 2017 9:25 PM

littletimmy

I'm right handed so obviosly that's the "painting hand"

What I do is extend my pinky and rest it on the workbench. It helps.

I'm also a  smoker (I know... I know.... I have been cutting back lately. I'm down to 6 or 7 a day.  Unless I'm in a bar...... then I smoke a pack in an hour...... and come home with my  vocal cord's feeling like hamburger!) So sometimes when I'm about to paint i smoke to lessen the hand tremmer's.

I DO NOT RECOMMEND  A N Y B O D Y  STARTING SMOKING JUST TO EASE HAND TREMBLING !!!!!    ( or for any other reason !!! )

Trembling DOES come in handy for wethering ( just load up the brush with Rust and "twitch" away!

 
I just GOTTA ask this - do you ever get ashes in your paint jobs? Propeller

Devil Dawg

On The Bench: Travel 1/48th Hasegawa A-7 Corsair II;  Travel 1/48th Hasegawa F/A-18F Super Hornet;  Travel 1/48th Eduard/Hasegawa Ultimate Sabre with "MiG Mad Marine" markings;

Build one at a time? Hah! That'll be the day!!

  • Member since
    March, 2005
  • From: Lancaster, South Carolina
Posted by Devil Dawg on Monday, October 16, 2017 9:27 PM

templar1099
 
stikpusher
Also deep slow breathing can reduce the shaking as well. 

 


Extend this process to all things. Master your breath and you master your mind,the body will follow.

Not sure I can master halitosis........ Sorry! Couldn't resist that one! Too easy.....

Might just hafta give the breathing techniques a try. Hadn't thought about that.

Devil Dawg

On The Bench: Travel 1/48th Hasegawa A-7 Corsair II;  Travel 1/48th Hasegawa F/A-18F Super Hornet;  Travel 1/48th Eduard/Hasegawa Ultimate Sabre with "MiG Mad Marine" markings;

Build one at a time? Hah! That'll be the day!!

  • Member since
    March, 2005
  • From: Lancaster, South Carolina
Posted by Devil Dawg on Monday, October 16, 2017 9:28 PM

Greg

Yes to about everything said above.

Plus I'd like to add that I fine mine starts when I've been "working" perhaps a bit too long and almost too focused. And, as you say, it's always something small and finicky.

My 2 cents is to walk away for a bit, get away from the bench.

It is nice to know I'm not the only one.

 
Mine happens as soon as I get to the bench, so, if I walk away, I'd never get any modeling done!

Devil Dawg

On The Bench: Travel 1/48th Hasegawa A-7 Corsair II;  Travel 1/48th Hasegawa F/A-18F Super Hornet;  Travel 1/48th Eduard/Hasegawa Ultimate Sabre with "MiG Mad Marine" markings;

Build one at a time? Hah! That'll be the day!!

  • Member since
    March, 2005
  • From: Lancaster, South Carolina
Posted by Devil Dawg on Monday, October 16, 2017 9:32 PM

shamoo

I'm 53 as well and I find the same thing.  Doctor says my problem is mostly the Albuterol I have to use for my COPD.  Besides resting my hands as described above,  I have found that using a breathing technique I was taught in therapy called "pursed lip breathing."  This is basically inhaling calmly through the nose, then exhaling through the mouth with your lips tightly pursed as if whistling, so you can actually feel some back pressure in your chest.  Try to take at least twice as long to exhale as it took to inhale, but the longer the better.  I use this to control shortness of breath, and seems to help calm my shaky fingers down before I start painting, etc..  Might be worth a try, anyway.

 
That was my breathing technique back whan I was still an avid runner. Sadly for me, I can't (not allowed) run anymore due to my arthritis causing a bad lower back, bad right hip, bad right knee, and bad right foot. My left side has it, too, just not as bad as my right side. I've often wondered if the right side is so much worse because that's my dominant side. Hmmmmmmmm........... need to ask my doctor about that, if I remember it the next time I see him.

Devil Dawg

On The Bench: Travel 1/48th Hasegawa A-7 Corsair II;  Travel 1/48th Hasegawa F/A-18F Super Hornet;  Travel 1/48th Eduard/Hasegawa Ultimate Sabre with "MiG Mad Marine" markings;

Build one at a time? Hah! That'll be the day!!

  • Member since
    March, 2005
  • From: Lancaster, South Carolina
Posted by Devil Dawg on Monday, October 16, 2017 9:33 PM

Griffin25

 When I bear down and really concentrate on a hard to fit part or a really intracit paint job I get shaky right at the most critical time. I suffer from task specific Focal Dystonia in my right hand. It sucks. Perhaps you have a touch of that. Stress makes it much worse. I had to quit playing golf and get by in tennis with a rediculously extreme western grip. I actually have an appointment to go see someone in the next couple weeks. It only took me 25 years this is the first time I'm actually going to do something about it. I read that Parkinson medications or even Botox is a treatment. We'll see. Google  focal dystonia. Get a second opinion for sure.

 
Thanks, Griffin. I will definitely look that up.

Devil Dawg

On The Bench: Travel 1/48th Hasegawa A-7 Corsair II;  Travel 1/48th Hasegawa F/A-18F Super Hornet;  Travel 1/48th Eduard/Hasegawa Ultimate Sabre with "MiG Mad Marine" markings;

Build one at a time? Hah! That'll be the day!!

  • Member since
    March, 2005
  • From: Lancaster, South Carolina
Posted by Devil Dawg on Monday, October 16, 2017 9:35 PM

Don Stauffer

When I am doing fine work, like fine painting or tweezer work, I try to keep both hands supported and connected to the same support.  Sometimes I will put a box down on the bench top, with my left hand resting on the box and the paint brush or tweezer in the left hand, also resting on the box.

If that is not pratical, or when the model is sitting on benchtop itself, I will place left hand on bench near where I am working on model, making a fist, and have right hand resting on left, or forearm near wrist, resting on the left hand fist.

I try to make all the motion with the right hand and fingers.  I never to any fine work with neither right wrist area nor elbow supported by workbench.  Sometimes both forearm/wrists resting on work benchtop, model or piece to be worked on in left, tool or brush in right.

 

I try to rest both hands/arms on something, too, but never thought about using a box to raise it all up a bit. I'll have to give that a try. Thanks, Don!

Devil Dawg

On The Bench: Travel 1/48th Hasegawa A-7 Corsair II;  Travel 1/48th Hasegawa F/A-18F Super Hornet;  Travel 1/48th Eduard/Hasegawa Ultimate Sabre with "MiG Mad Marine" markings;

Build one at a time? Hah! That'll be the day!!

  • Member since
    March, 2005
  • From: Lancaster, South Carolina
Posted by Devil Dawg on Monday, October 16, 2017 9:36 PM

Hunter

 

stikpusher

I am something of a coffee fiend at times, and when I have more than I should before a bench session, the shakes show up. I counter them by placing my hand against the work bench or some other non moving surface to steady my control.

Also deep slow breathing can reduce the shaking as well. 

 

LOL...I'm with you Stik, I love my coffee and if I drink too much my paint lines look like a EKG reading off the charts. Huh?

Now, THAT'S funny!

Devil Dawg

On The Bench: Travel 1/48th Hasegawa A-7 Corsair II;  Travel 1/48th Hasegawa F/A-18F Super Hornet;  Travel 1/48th Eduard/Hasegawa Ultimate Sabre with "MiG Mad Marine" markings;

Build one at a time? Hah! That'll be the day!!

  • Member since
    March, 2005
  • From: Lancaster, South Carolina
Posted by Devil Dawg on Monday, October 16, 2017 9:43 PM

plasticjunkie

Gary

Do you freak out when doing this type of detail work? Sometimes one is so concerned about not shaking or moving and it happens cuz one tries so hard not too.

If you are a coffee drinker the cafeene will have an effect. I know my blood pressure goes up a couple of numbers after a cup. 

My hands rarely shake but it's always good to support it to get better results.

I always say that the best doctor is oneself and if you feel something is not right then get a second opinion just for your own peace of mind.

 
Nah, not freakin' out or anything - just get frustrated after awhile. That's when I decide to work on something else on the build that's not so small. Or peruse the FSM website and get caught up on the threads (kinda like I'm doing now.......).
 
Already had a few doctors tell me this isn't anything serious - some people get it worse and/or earlier in life than others. I've had blood tests run to rule out anything serious. I guess in my inital post I made it sound worse than it really is. It just has me more frustrated than anything else.

Devil Dawg

On The Bench: Travel 1/48th Hasegawa A-7 Corsair II;  Travel 1/48th Hasegawa F/A-18F Super Hornet;  Travel 1/48th Eduard/Hasegawa Ultimate Sabre with "MiG Mad Marine" markings;

Build one at a time? Hah! That'll be the day!!

  • Member since
    March, 2005
  • From: Lancaster, South Carolina
Posted by Devil Dawg on Monday, October 16, 2017 9:51 PM

Tanker - Builder

Gary ;

    First and foremost , what brand of coffee or tea do you drink? Change that . Remember I consume a pot or more of Marine grade coffee a day . No Shakes . I recommend as far as tea to switch to Earl grey .It has a hint of Bergamot and a fine flavor .

   Now as to coffee, The Colombians have me hooked ! I just love the dark roast Colombian from Folgers ! Also , I find if you have a sharp workbench on which you prop your arms can do this to you .You are to young to be shakin . Do you Imbibe .Change brands  , I did and it helped . I now like or need less of  "Devils Cut " as far as that goes .My fave has always been Couvosier in two fingered glasses at room temp .

 Now there is another reason .You have gotten high on your glue and the wonderful smell of plastic .More ventilation Young Man !!! LOL.LOL. You'll get the hang of thangs .T.B. 

 
I usually drink a couple of cups of coffee in the morning right after breakfast (Maxwell House light roast - 12oz Keurig cups), and then a couple of Cokes during the day. I usually only drink tea when I have a sore throat, and then it's only hot tea with a lot of honey stirred in (tastes great, and really does help a sore throat). I do prefer Folger's Coffee, but I can't seem to find it in light roast Keurig cups - only medium and dark roasts around here in the Charlotte area (I live just south of Charlotte in Lancaster, SC).
 
I drink hardly at all. When I do (maybe once every three to six months), it's usually a beer or two with a friend. Can't do the hard liquor after watching what it did to both parents.
 
I think you figured it out with the glue - THAT'S IT!!! Big Smile Cool Propeller I do love the smell of that stuff! Well, the Testor's tube glue, anyways. And lacquer thinner......

Devil Dawg

On The Bench: Travel 1/48th Hasegawa A-7 Corsair II;  Travel 1/48th Hasegawa F/A-18F Super Hornet;  Travel 1/48th Eduard/Hasegawa Ultimate Sabre with "MiG Mad Marine" markings;

Build one at a time? Hah! That'll be the day!!

  • Member since
    July, 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 7:53 PM

Devil Dawg
I just GOTTA ask this - do you ever get ashes in your paint jobs? 

Not as often as it use to ( my paint job's from the 1990's do have a certain "texture" to them ) It was'nt that I was dropping ash on the model's..... it was a static charge drawing the ash to it. That's when I learned the "trick" of using a brass sheet to discharge the charge.

Havent had ash in my paint since 2002. That's when I started cutting back on my smoking.

( In 2003 I went from a pack and 1/2 a day and gradually got it down to 6 or 7 cigarett's a day......I just cant seem to stop altogether.)

                      Dont worry about the thumbprint... paint it rust and call it "Battle damage" !

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