SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Aaron Skinner, we are no longer speaking!

1074 views
25 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    September, 2012
Aaron Skinner, we are no longer speaking!
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, January 05, 2018 10:14 PM

Of course I hope that's not true...

Thank you for reminding us in the viddie that 2001 came out 50 years ago. Give an old man a break.

That movie was seminal in my appreciation of scratchbuilt scale modeling. Ordway and Lange were better than interpreters, they were real design engineers. 

Besides Discovery, there's Orion 3, which was just a beautiful ship, there's the Moon Bus, Aries, the EVA pods and the Space Station.

My favorite, the space suits and in particular the helmets.

That, and the clothing in the space station scene was designed by Hardy Amies.

I stayed in the theater the first time and watched it twice. Went again with my Dad the next day, he the aerospace engineer.

 

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by Retired In Kalifornia on Friday, January 05, 2018 10:27 PM

My Avatar is homage to 2001: A Space Odyssey. I didn't see the film till 1974.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, January 05, 2018 10:53 PM

Putting aside the Strauss and Strauss II if thats possible, the theme from the Moon Bus sequence is everything an out of the world experience should be,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K6ZBSdjzKfk

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Sydney, Australia
Posted by Phil_H on Friday, January 05, 2018 11:03 PM

The rolling docking sequence is pretty cool too. I remember it being replicated as a challenge in an early computer game whose name escapes me now.

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by Retired In Kalifornia on Friday, January 05, 2018 11:12 PM

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, January 07, 2018 10:39 AM

Phil_H

The rolling docking sequence is pretty cool too. I remember it being replicated as a challenge in an early computer game whose name escapes me now.

 

Indeed, and that Pan Am space liner is still available as a kit.  The decals have been changed, but if you know the secret, you can make the Pan Am decals from the kit decals.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    January, 2018
Posted by Jet Jaguar on Sunday, January 07, 2018 12:32 PM

Phil_H

The rolling docking sequence is pretty cool too. I remember it being replicated as a challenge in an early computer game whose name escapes me now.

 

 

That would probably be "Elite".  You had to match the rotation of the station to get through the docking slot.  I had it for the Apple IIe, but my friend had it for the C64, and IIRC the C64 version even played the Blue Danube Waltz during docking.

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Monday, January 08, 2018 10:04 PM

Retired In Kalifornia

My Avatar is homage to 2001: A Space Odyssey. I didn't see the film till 1974.

 

My brother George took me to the Olympia Theater in Downtown Miami to see 2001 A Space Odyssey when it came out in 1968 and I was in awe watching it and thinking about life in the future. 

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by Retired In Kalifornia on Monday, January 08, 2018 10:28 PM

plasticjunkie

 

 
Retired In Kalifornia

My Avatar is homage to 2001: A Space Odyssey. I didn't see the film till 1974.

 

 

 

My brother George took me to the Olympia Theater in Downtown Miami to see 2001 A Space Odyssey when it came out in 1968 and I was in awe watching it and thinking about life in the future. 

 

The Esquire Downtown Sacramento K Street northside between 12th & 13th was one of several in the metro area hosting 2001 in 1968, didn't see it there but could see models hanging of all the "flying stuff" & space station from lobby ceiling. My friend of 54 years now smuggled in a 35mm camera to photograph movie scenes, something of a fad was later told.

The Esquire fell on hard times in 1970s & 80s then closed for what seemed more than 15 years but facade kept intact, late 1990s Esquire Tower built next to the theatre, it - the theatre - reopening as an IMAX around 2000. The Sacramento Esquire is believed one of a relatively small number of early 1930s vintage downtown theatres surviving today as an IMAX.

I'd only been in the Esquire twice: c. November 7, 1963 to see Its A Mad Mad Mad Mad World on its release, Star Trek - The Motion Picture re-release 20 years later, theatre physical condition then was appaling.

  • Member since
    May, 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 1:07 AM

I watched 2001 on TV back in 1975 or so.  When the movie started, I thought my dad had pranked me into watching a monkey show!  Even though I had no idea what was going on I thought it was neat. And "Also Spracht Zarathustra" was forever etched into my little pea brain.

When I recently watched the movie, the thing that struck me most was that the flight and docking sequenes were closer to "real time" compared to more recent films.  I am always annoyed when a craft zooms into a crowded area, sets down, and the door/ramp opens as the landing gear are settling, AND someone is already deplaning from the ramp.  So nobody has to  observe the "fasten seat belts" sign in the future?  Yeah I know, it's to keep the story going, blah blah blah.  But I appreciated 2001's effort to depict such proceedures in a more realistic manner.

The only technical aspect that I felt was poor was that Bowman's eyes were constantly darting about in the pod while attempting to retrieve Poole's body.  I guess HUDs were not yet commonplace.  But he DID have a tablet computer!

Eagerly awaiting the Moebius Discovery from my LHS!

Moderator
  • Member since
    April, 2006
  • From: my keyboard dreaming of being at the workbench
Posted by Aaron Skinner on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 9:13 AM

Thanks for giving me a heart attack with this thread title!Big Smile

I saw "2001" the first time on video, but then saw it at a small arts cinema in Brisbane in the late '80s as part of a month-long science fiction and fantasy movie festival. The highlight was during the trip through the gate near the end when the film got stuck in the projector and burned up. I think several people thought it was part of the movie until the house lights came up and the explained it would take a couple of minutes to rethread the projector.

The effects and models still look good today!

Cheers, Aaron

Aaron Skinner

Senior Editor

FineScale Modeler

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by Retired In Kalifornia on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 9:50 AM

Real G

I watched 2001 on TV back in 1975 or so.  When the movie started, I thought my dad had pranked me into watching a monkey show!  Even though I had no idea what was going on I thought it was neat. And "Also Spracht Zarathustra" was forever etched into my little pea brain.

When I recently watched the movie, the thing that struck me most was that the flight and docking sequenes were closer to "real time" compared to more recent films.  I am always annoyed when a craft zooms into a crowded area, sets down, and the door/ramp opens as the landing gear are settling, AND someone is already deplaning from the ramp.  So nobody has to  observe the "fasten seat belts" sign in the future?  Yeah I know, it's to keep the story going, blah blah blah.  But I appreciated 2001's effort to depict such proceedures in a more rralistic manner.

The only technical aspect that I felt was poor was that Bowman's eyes were constantly darting about in the pod while attempting to retrieve Poole's body.  I guess HUDs were not yet commonplace.  But he DID have a tablet computer!

Eagerly awaiting the Moebius Discovery from my LHS!

 

Yep, but even with HUD I'd bet they'd be eye close ups showing the nervousness. Bowman's expressions were the one really "human" dramatic part of the whole film, loved how red lights appeared over his eyes when the "Open The Pod Bay Doors Hal" conversation got underway.

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 11:27 AM

1968? I had to look it up to believe it.

Good thread. Yes

-Greg

  • Member since
    May, 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 11:40 AM

I assume Bowman's super serious expression combined with the constant flitting about of his eyes to various readouts was to heighten the dramatic impact of the moment.  And the proximity radar's boink--boink--boink-boink-boinkboinkboink sound contributed to the drama (and to tell the audience that he was nearing poor Poole).

I hope a styrene kit of the pod shows up before 2101!  Maybe around 1/12 to 1/24 scale, not something so huge that you could wear it as a helmet for your own "Space Odyssey".  Stick out tongue

The movies props and effects do stand the test of time very well.  Maybe the civillian clothing at the space station is kind of "1960s groovy space age", but everything else was solid.

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 12:23 PM

I appreciate that Kubrik strove for scientific accuracy, particularly regarding space sequences.  Though it might be a cool effect when spaceships roar past on the screen, there's no sound in a vacuum.  I appreciated that about "Firefly", too.

The only part of the movie that I thought was weak was the sequence when Dave entered and traveled through the star gate.  Clarke's novelization had very precise and detailed descriptions of what Dave saw, till he reached his destination.  For example, he passes over a space port of some kind, and sees ships of other interstellar travelers.   The sequence in the movie is more of an acid trip than anything else, distorted images of terrestrial vistas.  I don't think it was a technical limitation, either, not to depict it, but an artistic decision.

Still, it's a landmark, one of those films that represents a major change or shift in a genre.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by Retired In Kalifornia on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 2:43 PM

the Baron

I appreciate that Kubrik strove for scientific accuracy, particularly regarding space sequences.  Though it might be a cool effect when spaceships roar past on the screen, there's no sound in a vacuum.  I appreciated that about "Firefly", too.

The only part of the movie that I thought was weak was the sequence when Dave entered and traveled through the star gate.  Clarke's novelization had very precise and detailed descriptions of what Dave saw, till he reached his destination.  For example, he passes over a space port of some kind, and sees ships of other interstellar travelers.   The sequence in the movie is more of an acid trip than anything else, distorted images of terrestrial vistas.  I don't think it was a technical limitation, either, not to depict it, but an artistic decision.

Still, it's a landmark, one of those films that represents a major change or shift in a genre.

Late 1970s came across a sci fi fanzine with single photo still of a supposed deleted movie scene of Bowman in the pod headed towards a collection of vertical columns of multi-color light ala city scape, open space above & below them, didn't see the pod hurtling towards it though. I can't find it on the Internet - yet - but would love to see it again.

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Longmont, Colorado
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 5:46 PM

I never did figure out the meaning of this film.  The ending disappointed me and left me going "HUH?"  I read the book, and that didn't help, either.  Great Sci Fi effects, though!

Computer, did we bring batteries?.....Computer?

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by Retired In Kalifornia on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 6:21 PM

Cadet Chuck

I never did figure out the meaning of this film.  The ending disappointed me and left me going "HUH?"  I read the book, and that didn't help, either.  Great Sci Fi effects, though!

 

Lotta ink scribbled over decades regarding the ending, the "light show" should had been the ending IMHO. Exterior shots of pod flying through it would had been super neat; "hardware meeting the amorphous" is what grabbed me about the film.

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by Retired In Kalifornia on Tuesday, January 09, 2018 6:33 PM

Retired In Kalifornia

 

 
Cadet Chuck

I never did figure out the meaning of this film.  The ending disappointed me and left me going "HUH?"  I read the book, and that didn't help, either.  Great Sci Fi effects, though!

 

 

 

Lotta ink scribbled over decades regarding the ending, the "light show" should had been the ending IMHO. Exterior shots of pod flying through it would had been super neat; "hardware meeting the amorphous" is what grabbed me about the film.

 

 

OK, fade out from light show, fade into this: 

NO Star Wars music just Mos Eisley street sounds.

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Wednesday, January 10, 2018 11:06 AM

Chuck's post reminds me as (then legal age) beer-drinking teens, endless hours of beer-talk involved the meaning of the end of 2001. Don't think we ever resolved anything, but it sure seemed so at the time. IdeaBeer

-Greg

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, January 10, 2018 3:34 PM

Way above my pay grade.

In searching around some of the things you've all brought up in this disco, I did find a bunch of photos of the set and shoots. Pretty interesting.

RIK, did you cook that picture up or did I miss that in SW?

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by Retired In Kalifornia on Wednesday, January 10, 2018 9:17 PM

GMorrison

Way above my pay grade.

In searching around some of the things you've all brought up in this disco, I did find a bunch of photos of the set and shoots. Pretty interesting.

RIK, did you cook that picture up or did I miss that in SW?

 

SW E1 production still off the Internet; here's frame from the film (near center):

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Thursday, January 11, 2018 2:09 PM

Cadet Chuck

I never did figure out the meaning of this film.  The ending disappointed me and left me going "HUH?"  I read the book, and that didn't help, either.  Great Sci Fi effects, though!

 
Well, the meaning is pretty simple.  It goes back to a short story Clarke wrote in 1951, called, "The Sentinel."  The plot described a mission to the Moon, in which an alien artifact is found, and when it is disturbed, generates a signal directed to an unknown destination.  Here is the protagonist's own explanation, as he reflects on finding the artifact:
 
"When our world was half its present age, something from the stars swept through the Solar System, left this token of its passage, and went again upon its way. Until we destroyed it, that machine was still fulfilling the purpose of its builders; and as to that purpose, here is my guess.
Nearly a hundred thousand million stars are turning in the circle of the Milky Way, and long ago
other races on the worlds of other suns must have scaled and passed the heights that we have
reached. Think of such civilizations, far back in time against the fading afterglow of Creation,
masters of a universe so young that life as yet had come only to a handful of worlds. Theirs would have been a loneliness we cannot imagine, the loneliness of gods looking out across infinity and finding none to share their thoughts.  They must have searched the star clusters as we have searched the planets. Everywhere there would be worlds, but they would be empty or peopled with crawling, mindless things. Such was our own Earth, the smoke of the great volcanoes still staining the skies, when that first ship of the peoples of the dawn came sliding in from the abyss beyond Pluto. It passed the frozen outer worlds, knowing that life could play no part in their destinies. It came to rest among the inner planets, warming themselves around the fire of the Sun and waiting for their stories to begin.
Those wanderers must have looked on Earth, circling safely in the narrow zone between fire and ice, and must have guessed that it was the favorite of the Sun’s children. Here, in the distant future, would be intelligence; but there were countless stars before them still, and they might never come this way again.
So they left a sentinel, one of millions they have scattered throughout the Universe, watching over all worlds with the promise of life. It was a beacon that down the ages has been patiently signaling the fact that no one had discovered it.
Perhaps you understand now why that crystal pyramid was set upon the Moon instead of on the Earth. Its builders were not concerned with races still struggling up from savagery. They would be interested in our civilization only if we proved our fitness to survive by crossing space and so escaping from the Earth, our cradle. That is the challenge that all intelligent races must meet, sooner or later. It is a double challenge, for it depends in turn upon the conquest of atomic energy and the last choice between life and death.
Once we had passed that crisis, it was only a matter of time before we found the pyramid and
forced it open. Now its signals have ceased, and those whose duty it is will be turning their minds upon Earth. Perhaps they wish to help our infant civilization. But they must be very, very old, and the old are often insanely jealous of the young.
I can never look now at the Milky Way without wondering from which of those banked clouds of stars the emissaries are coming. If you will pardon so commonplace a simile, we have set off the fire alarm and have nothing to do but to wait.
I do not think we will have to wait for long."
 
That's preserved in the movie (the signal beamed from the Moon, when the sunlight hits the unearthed slab in Tycho), though the movie adds the concept that the alien race had a role in moving our evolution along, via telepathic suggestions emanating from the slab in the "Dawn of Man" sequence.  And it adds the concept then of the star gate.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Thursday, January 11, 2018 2:25 PM

You can find the complete short story here, by the way:

http://econtent.typepad.com/TheSentinel.pdf

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Thursday, January 11, 2018 2:49 PM

I'm going off on a bit of a tangent, but another great Clarke short story, about an encounter, of sorts, between humans and an alien race, is "History Lesson", from 1949.  You can read it here:  https://www.scribd.com/document/208246694/Arthur-C-Clarke-History-Lesson

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/HansvonHammer/Humor/th_MonogramMafia.jpg?t=1296972087

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by Retired In Kalifornia on Thursday, January 11, 2018 4:44 PM

The "We Are Property" notion of Clark's "Monolith" books belies the alternative notion that super-intelligent entities wouldn't bother conducting "petri dish" experiments given its likely intelligent space-faring life has evolved without their neighborly help, Planet Earth intentionally left out here to avoid getting into theologic arguments.

Yes, its entirely possible superbeings are busily petri-dishing within the Universe right now but that doesn't answer Why Bother unless they're lonely for company. If its "Y'all can be in our club some millions of [Earth] years in the future if y'all pass our cosmic initiation rights" then it ain't conceptually different than being a member of the Loyal Order of Water Buffaloes sans all the benefits of creating intelligent life at will. Just don't relish knowing I'm an amoeba being yanked around; David Bowman should had squalked about that IMHO. 

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

SUBSCRIBER-ONLY CONTENT
FREE NEWSLETTER