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GI Dog Tags

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  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Northern New Jersey
GI Dog Tags
Posted by Tojo72 on Monday, January 29, 2018 11:22 AM

I found a pair of what look like my father in laws WWII dogtags,they have on them besides his name and number,his address and his mothers name,is that correct,seems like too much info.Couldnt that be used by the enemy for propaganda purposes,sending demoralizing letters to next of kin.

Forgive my lack of knowledge on such matters.

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Monday, January 29, 2018 11:37 AM

Back in WW2, all letters would go through the Swiss and would be censored. Germans wouldn't just chuck it in the Bundespost and mail it to the USPS. Mainly for Red Cross POW or KIA notification.

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Northern New Jersey
Posted by Tojo72 on Monday, January 29, 2018 11:38 AM

Rob Gronovius

Back in WW2, all letters would go through the Swiss and would be censored. Germans wouldn't just chuck it in the Bundespost and mail it to the USPS. Mainly for Red Cross POW or KIA notification.

 

Thanks Rob

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Monday, January 29, 2018 11:59 AM

Does seem  bit to much info. Our modern ID disks just have intials and surname, number, rank, religion and blood group.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

  

On the bench: AFV Club 1/35th Sd.Kfz 251/4 AusfC

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, January 29, 2018 12:02 PM

You might show them to someone who's an expert on authenticating. I know that like Zippos, so-called real ones get sold all over the place. Air shows, for example.

My F-I-L wrote his number inside everything he had.

Sould have his blood type too.

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Monday, January 29, 2018 12:21 PM

Just a thought, could these have been left on personal items not taken into theater and to be sent home should the worse happen.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

  

On the bench: AFV Club 1/35th Sd.Kfz 251/4 AusfC

fox
  • Member since
    January, 2007
  • From: Narvon, Pa.
Posted by fox on Monday, January 29, 2018 7:48 PM

My 2 cents. I would find a VFW post and check with them. Has to be someone there who had them. Hope that this helps. Good luck.

Jim  Captain

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GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, January 29, 2018 11:08 PM

Good!  This may answer a few questions about them.

http://www.hardscrabblefarm.com/ww2/dogtags_serial.htm

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Monday, January 29, 2018 11:23 PM

Looking at that link, it appears that the information format on the tags was revamped a few times during the war. Very interesting...

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Tuesday, January 30, 2018 1:54 AM

Good info GAF, its interesting that they carried so much information.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

  

On the bench: AFV Club 1/35th Sd.Kfz 251/4 AusfC

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Thursday, February 01, 2018 5:55 AM

A different time and era. Most likely that was the standard procedure for dog tags back then.

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Thursday, February 01, 2018 12:49 PM

I belong to a metal detecting club, and subscribe to a couple of magazines on the hobby.  Every once in awhile people will dig up a tag when detecting.  Most will take the time to dig and research, and try to get it back to a family member as a remberance of the individual.

  • Member since
    October, 2004
  • From: Orlando, Florida
Posted by ikar01 on Thursday, February 01, 2018 4:45 PM

I have my Father's tags and it has much the same info on them.  I checked with someone and they said this type of tag didn't last too long.

Why would you want to give the enemy that much information?

GAF
  • Member since
    June, 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Friday, February 02, 2018 9:32 PM

ikar01

I have my Father's tags and it has much the same info on them.  I checked with someone and they said this type of tag didn't last too long.

Why would you want to give the enemy that much information?

 
One thing I do want to know is if the services replaced these tags with the newer ones as the war went on.  This might be why families have these older tags, as servicemen might have just left them at home once they received new ones.  OR did these tags remain in service all through the war?  Another mystery to clear up.
 
Gary

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