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Should I, or Shouldn't I ???

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  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Should I, or Shouldn't I ???
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Wednesday, September 22, 2021 7:03 AM

Hi Ya'll!!

       Been a while since I bored you so I thought I would try again. My Son ( Adopted) is still after me to write a book about the " Dark Ages" of modeling, up to present day! I still wonder if there would be any takers. I mean, after all who would be interested in someone who built models from Scrap pieces of wood using Casein glue for adhesive. Yes! This was before Ambroid. (Well, for me anyway!) 

        So Whaddya think, Should I, or Shouldn't I ??

  • Member since
    June 2021
Posted by rocketman2000 on Wednesday, September 22, 2021 7:36 AM

Tanker-Builder

Hi Ya'll!!

       Been a while since I bored you so I thought I would try again. My Son ( Adopted) is still after me to write a book about the " Dark Ages" of modeling, up to present day! I still wonder if there would be any takers. I mean, after all who would be interestes in someone who built models from Scrap pieces of wood using Casein glue for adhesive. Yes! This was before Ambroid. (Well for me anyway!) 

        So Whaddya think, Should I, or Shouldn't I ??

 

I used casein glue a couple of times.  It came in a little paper package, and had to be mixed with water.  It had a bad smell, and took a long time to dry.  But I found out the dime store I bought my kits from also carried Testors model airplane glue. It cost 10c a tube, and was well worth it for the fast drying time.

I also remember kits made during the war that had harder woods substituted for balsa.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, September 22, 2021 9:44 AM

I think about modeling in the 50's and 60's as a lot more social.

- Junior high school model railroad club. Afternoons working on a layout in a spare room down at the public pool on the layout that never ended. of course hand spiking made it slower.

- Building models with a friend after school and homework.

- Gas powered tethered flight at the school basketball courts with a club.

- Taking my cars in a shoe box to the slot car track in the back of the LHS to race on Saturday mornings.

- Pond sailing with a loose club down at the baylands.

- Of course spending hours at the 5 and dime with my paper route money trying to pick a model.

More stuff like that.

Write the book. Whether it gets published or not, the experiences are gone forever with you otherwise.

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Wednesday, September 22, 2021 10:29 AM

When I started my first book, I figured it to be a serious 'niche' book, meaning I figured that I would not sell many and those would be strictly to USS Arizona / Pearl Harbor history people and possibly a few modelers. Now five years later, without any substantial marketing done, some serious life issues that take up a lot of my time, and a global pandemic, I'm pleased to say I've sold some seven hundred plus books.

The lesson here is "Go do it". Write the book, get 200 copies printed, sell them and/or give them to friends (I don't want to tell you just how many I've donated to people and libraries, but it's a bunch!); but none-the-less, do it. Modeling has been a big part of your life; so make it part of your legacy too.

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

  • Member since
    March 2005
Posted by philo426 on Wednesday, September 22, 2021 12:07 PM

Great idea!A perspective of a long term scale modeler would be of interest to many!

  • Member since
    August 2021
Posted by goldhammer88 on Wednesday, September 22, 2021 12:20 PM

Either write it or put it on tape.  

GM is right, once you're gone, it's lost forever.  Just like so many stories from the vets of various conflicts.

  • Member since
    January 2010
Posted by rob44 on Wednesday, September 22, 2021 5:19 PM

 

"- Gas powered tethered flight at the school basketball courts with a club."

 

Good grief I totally forgot about that! What a flood of memories came back!

 

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Wednesday, September 22, 2021 8:18 PM

Or .  .  .   a rubber band powered, Guillows Fokker D7, off the roof .  .  . 

That first flight went over a hundred and fifty yards, landing in a soft bush.

 

On the other hand, the second flight was a major crash and burn into a Saguaro cactus!!!

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

  • Member since
    August 2021
Posted by goldhammer88 on Wednesday, September 22, 2021 8:59 PM

Easier to get it out of one of those than a jumping cholla.Big Smile

  • Member since
    June 2021
Posted by rocketman2000 on Thursday, September 23, 2021 9:24 AM

I have two books on history of model airplanes.

First is Tales of an Ancient Modeler, by Norm Rosenstock. I can find no publisher for it, but I got it from Amazon.

Second one I cannot find on my shelves but it was wonderful.  It was by my favorite aviation historian, even if I cannot remember his name.  He worked at the Smithsonian.  It was more of a true historical treatise starting back in 19th century and covered models used by early flight experimenters up through mid 20th Century.  I will keep looking.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Friday, September 24, 2021 12:40 PM

C'mon TB, get hot! I know that you know how to type because you're on this forum. 

     "Once upon a time, on a dark and stormy night, in a place far, far away, called Texas, there was a man with so many models that he didn't know what to do. He lived in a well-known two-chamber smoker along with his family and a large herd of Umpa-lumpas. His best friend was a droid named Three point five and a half-pio and rode a mighty steed named Evinrude. "

There I got it started for you.

Your turn.

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, September 24, 2021 12:54 PM

rocketman2000
Second one I cannot find on my shelves but it was wonderful.  It was by my favorite aviation historian, even if I cannot remember his name.  He worked at the Smithsonian.  It was more of a true historical treatise starting back in 19th century and covered models used by early flight experimenters up through mid 20th Century

Peter Jakab by any chance?

 

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Friday, September 24, 2021 2:22 PM

GMorrison
rocketman2000
Second one I cannot find on my shelves but it was wonderful.  It was by my favorite aviation historian, even if I cannot remember his name.  He worked at the Smithsonian.  It was more of a true historical treatise starting back in 19th century and covered models used by early flight experimenters up through mid 20th Century

Peter Jakab by any chance?

Bill

I would have guessed Bob (Robert C.) Mikesh...lots of great modeler-oriented books, though I don't know if he ever covered historical scale models specifically.

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Friday, September 24, 2021 3:29 PM

The only big builder / author I've ever worked with was Robert (Bob) Sumrall, who was the Curator of Ship Models at the Naval Academy. Great guy, very personable. He helped me in a couple of projects. I wish I had a tenth of his talent.

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Friday, September 24, 2021 8:26 PM

Write the book TB, I'll buy one and to hell with the naysayers.

I long to live in a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned

  • Member since
    September 2021
Posted by DooeyPyle67 on Friday, October 8, 2021 9:11 PM

It could be done IF... there is a market and interest for it.

Publishing a book is very hard. You'll spend most of your time working typing. editting, typing,  takingphotos, and editting, re-editting and re-editting some more enough to make your head spin on a swivel. Finding a publisher who is willing to invest time in such a book can also be extremely hard. Do you know how many hopeful authors get rejected for a book these days? Too many to count. It's not easy.

Just pointing out some hard facts to consider before you invest valuable time in writing a book on the history of model kit building. Good luck.

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