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Slang, colloquialisms, or "what did you just say?"

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  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Slang, colloquialisms, or "what did you just say?"
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Thursday, September 30, 2021 11:37 AM

So, in my conversations with Dodgy, from the land of OZ (Australia), we both encounter slang terms used by each other where, I at least, have to stop and look them up. Australians are apparently quite fond of their slang, you see. Anyway, this got me to thinking (which I don't do that much, so I'm out of practice), and I'll pose this query to all of you;  from your experience, "Which nationality has the most use of slang in their normal conversation?"

 

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Thursday, September 30, 2021 6:58 PM

I hate it when people force me to think. It hurts......

Mate I reckon it's the Brits, closely followed by the the Kiwi's and Oz. We do love our slang and it is normal practice for us to insult each other in our normal conversation, to which no one takes offence. Mind you if someone does take offence, I couldn't care less. In fact they can take the bloody gate as well......Big Smile

 

I long to live in a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Thursday, September 30, 2021 7:48 PM

Dodgy
it is normal practice for us to insult each other in our normal conversation, to which no one takes offence. Mind you if someone does take offence, I couldn't care less. In fact they can take the bloody gate as well.......   

You would do very well in the office I work. Heck. The women are even worse than the men. 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Thursday, September 30, 2021 7:55 PM

Down south here in the states - it's like their own language.  

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    August 2021
Posted by goldhammer88 on Thursday, September 30, 2021 8:11 PM

keavdog

Down south here in the states - it's like their own language.  

 

Got that right, bears no resemblance to American.  Spent over two years MS and SC.

  • Member since
    July 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Friday, October 1, 2021 12:18 PM

I say the British use the most slang.

( it was years of Monty Python that helped me keep up with them.)

 

 Dont worry about the thumbprint, paint it Rust , and call it "Battle Damage"

  • Member since
    April 2019
  • From: Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
Posted by John 3:16 KJV on Friday, October 1, 2021 12:28 PM

Ain't y'all heard of "ain't" and "y'all"? Stick out tongue

     “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

     For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.”  - John 3:16-17

 

 

  • Member since
    April 2009
  • From: Longmont, Colorado
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Friday, October 1, 2021 12:49 PM

Not to mention "All Y'all" ......(Plural of Y'all, which is singular.)

Computer, did we bring batteries?.....Computer?

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Friday, October 1, 2021 12:51 PM

In Hawaii, the most commonly encountered word that trips up people from the outside is "puka".  A puka is a hole, opening, aperture.

For example "Eh, your shirt stay have one puka!  Bettah change em braddah!"

I have seen many a mainland contractor suddenly look confused when "puka" is used on the jobsite.  I don't really speak in pidgin, but "puka" is part of the local lexicon, and I do use it.

And then there is the maddening island navigation system.  We use a form of polar coordinates to give directions.  Towards the center of the island is always "mauka" (towards the mountains), towards the ocean is "makai".  On Oahu, "Ewa" is to the west, "Diamond Head" is to the east.  But it only works if you are in Honolulu. If you are in Hawaii Kai, Diamond Head is to the west!  And we use places, not roads, to give specific directions.  So if you don't know where Rainbow Drive-In is, for example, you are out of luck.  Time to hit Google Maps.

There is a book titled "Pidgin to da Max", which should help the neophyte visitor understand the local slang.  But to be honest, I have never heard of a lot of what is in there!

Ho, and I stay live here all my life!

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Friday, October 1, 2021 3:10 PM

Dodgy

I hate it when people force me to think. It hurts......

Mate I reckon it's the Brits, closely followed by the the Kiwi's and Oz. We do love our slang and it is normal practice for us to insult each other in our normal conversation, to which no one takes offence. Mind you if someone does take offence, I couldn't care less. In fact they can take the bloody gate as well......Big Smile

 

 

Thats reminds me of the first time i was in Canada. We were in a bar in Jasper and the locals thought we were Australians because we called each other mate. You would have thought the Canucks would know where the Ozzies got their language from. I've always thought the candians were like us but more laid back, and the Australians were like us but with an even better sense of humour (which says a lot).

I'm sure you guys have heard of Cockney Rhyming Slang.

I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so

 

On the bench: Hasegawa 1/72nd Typhoon FGR.4/Airfix 1/72nd Victor K.2

  • Member since
    May 2020
  • From: North East of England
Posted by Hutch6390 on Friday, October 1, 2021 3:54 PM

Dodgy
Mate I reckon it's the Brits, closely followed by the the Kiwi's and Oz

I think I'd agree, Dodgy, although I'm not sure whether to be Smile or Embarrassed.  We have so many local accents & dialects crammed in to our small islands, influenced by so many languages, that words & phrases just get absorbed into everyday use.  New words are not a problem for me - they can enrich our language.  It's the erosion of grammar that does the damage. 

In my part of the country, the local "Geordie" dialect is almost a language unto itself.  A mix of old Scots, English, and Norse (old Scandinavian) tongues, it's practically unintelligible to outsiders, unless moderated - which can be a source of some amusement to usBig Smile.  Other parts of the UK (Yorkshire, the West Country, etc.) have similar claims, and London's Cockney rhyming slang is well-known (despite the efforts of *** Van ***Big Smile).

EDIT - Ah, I see the AutoProtect robot has been at work.  I meant, of course, that fine actor, Mr Richard Van Water-Restraining-Earthwork.

And yes, friendly insults are (usually!) taken in the spirit intended.

Noo haddaway wi' ya barra, an' gan canny!

Vell, Zaphod's just zis guy, you know?

TakkaTakkaTakkaTakkaTakkaTakka

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Friday, October 1, 2021 4:45 PM

Hutch6390

 

 
Dodgy
Mate I reckon it's the Brits, closely followed by the the Kiwi's and Oz

 

I think I'd agree, Dodgy, although I'm not sure whether to be Smile or Embarrassed.  We have so many local accents & dialects crammed in to our small islands, influenced by so many languages, that words & phrases just get absorbed into everyday use.  New words are not a problem for me - they can enrich our language.  It's the erosion of grammar that does the damage. 

In my part of the country, the local "Geordie" dialect is almost a language unto itself.  A mix of old Scots, English, and Norse (old Scandinavian) tongues, it's practically unintelligible to outsiders, unless moderated - which can be a source of some amusement to usBig Smile.  Other parts of the UK (Yorkshire, the West Country, etc.) have similar claims, and London's Cockney rhyming slang is well-known (despite the efforts of *** Van ***Big Smile).

EDIT - Ah, I see the AutoProtect robot has been at work.  I meant, of course, that fine actor, Mr Richard Van Water-Restraining-Earthwork.

And yes, friendly insults are (usually!) taken in the spirit intended.

Noo haddaway wi' ya barra, an' gan canny!

 

You should try a bit of Broad Norfolk Bor, even i struggle. Real Broad Norfolk isn't as common as it used to be, it seems to have been more watered down than many other reginal dialects and its near impossable to immitate. But it was good enough for Nelson.

I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so

 

On the bench: Hasegawa 1/72nd Typhoon FGR.4/Airfix 1/72nd Victor K.2

  • Member since
    May 2020
  • From: North East of England
Posted by Hutch6390 on Friday, October 1, 2021 5:05 PM

Bish
You should try a bit of Broad Norfolk Bor

I can just imagineBig Smile  And real Geordie is watered down a lot these days, too.

Bish
But it was good enough for Nelson.

Aye, no argument there.

 

Vell, Zaphod's just zis guy, you know?

TakkaTakkaTakkaTakkaTakkaTakka

 

  • Member since
    October 2004
  • From: Orlando, Florida
Posted by ikar01 on Friday, October 1, 2021 5:46 PM

Don't ask me, I'm from the colonies, we'all talk normal, don't y'all?

  • Member since
    April 2019
  • From: Earth, Milky Way Galaxy
Posted by John 3:16 KJV on Friday, October 1, 2021 7:20 PM

Cadet Chuck

Not to mention "All Y'all" ......(Plural of Y'all, which is singular.)

 

lol So true!

     “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

     For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.”  - John 3:16-17

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Friday, October 1, 2021 9:07 PM
Yuze people talk funny

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Friday, October 1, 2021 9:34 PM

Southern English .  .  . a whole different ball game!!!     Once had a girl friend who commonly said "Well y'all, I might could do that."      Might could; what the heck is 'might could'?    She'd just smile .  .  .

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

  • Member since
    August 2021
Posted by goldhammer88 on Friday, October 1, 2021 9:40 PM

Another from the South....red-up.

  • Member since
    August 2021
Posted by goldhammer88 on Friday, October 1, 2021 9:48 PM

Bish

 

 
Dodgy

I hate it when people force me to think. It hurts......

Mate I reckon it's the Brits, closely followed by the the Kiwi's and Oz. We do love our slang and it is normal practice for us to insult each other in our normal conversation, to which no one takes offence. Mind you if someone does take offence, I couldn't care less. In fact they can take the bloody gate as well......Big Smile

 

 

 

 

Thats reminds me of the first time i was in Canada. We were in a bar in Jasper and the locals thought we were Australians because we called each other mate. You would have thought the Canucks would know where the Ozzies got their language from. I've always thought the candians were like us but more laid back, and the Australians were like us but with an even better sense of humour (which says a lot).

I'm sure you guys have heard of Cockney Rhyming Slang.

 

But then the French snuck into Canada for the fur trade.

  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Friday, October 1, 2021 11:02 PM

Real G

In Hawaii, the most commonly encountered word that trips up people from the outside is "puka".  A puka is a hole, opening, aperture.

For example "Eh, your shirt stay have one puka!  Bettah change em braddah!"

I have seen many a mainland contractor suddenly look confused when "puka" is used on the jobsite.  I don't really speak in pidgin, but "puka" is part of the local lexicon, and I do use it.

And then there is the maddening island navigation system.  We use a form of polar coordinates to give directions.  Towards the center of the island is always "mauka" (towards the mountains), towards the ocean is "makai".  On Oahu, "Ewa" is to the west, "Diamond Head" is to the east.  But it only works if you are in Honolulu. If you are in Hawaii Kai, Diamond Head is to the west!  And we use places, not roads, to give specific directions.  So if you don't know where Rainbow Drive-In is, for example, you are out of luck.  Time to hit Google Maps.

There is a book titled "Pidgin to da Max", which should help the neophyte visitor understand the local slang.  But to be honest, I have never heard of a lot of what is in there!

Ho, and I stay live here all my life!

 

Your part of the world is not alone Real G. On Norfolk Island the local speak is mainly pidgin. These people are the decendants of the Bounty mutineers and the their language is very unique.

I long to live in a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned

  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Friday, October 1, 2021 11:28 PM

Bish and Hutch: much of our slang in Aussie is derived from the Brits. After all, up until the end of WWII, Britain was very much 'the mother country'. Since then the American influence has changed much. Terms like 'buddy', 'french fries', 'patio' and 'lounge room', etc have now become common place and the pre 1950's Aussie idiom has become very watered down.

The reason I use the term 'American influence' is because, since the 1950's, Australia has embraced much American culture. Supermarkets, rock'n roll, fast food, etc, were all unknown in Oz before then. What I don't understand and personally dislike intensely, is the more recent fascination of our kids with American gang culture, its violence, 'dress codes' and sub-culture. To me it is so alien to our way of life, but a lot of the kids in the cities are drinking it up.  

I long to live in a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned

  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Saturday, October 2, 2021 4:17 AM

Incidently, we also swear a lot and probably are not the most religious mob.........

I long to live in a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Saturday, October 2, 2021 1:33 PM

Dodgy

Incidently, we also swear a lot and probably are not the most religious mob.........

 

Amen to that Big Smile

I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so

 

On the bench: Hasegawa 1/72nd Typhoon FGR.4/Airfix 1/72nd Victor K.2

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Saturday, October 2, 2021 6:09 PM

keavdog

Down south here in the states - it's like their own language.  

Yes, when I met my Kentucky wife (I am from New England), it was like she spoke her own language of Kentucky-ese. When she and her sister-in-law spoke, I could barely follow along.

A work, a Puerto Rican woman who speaks mainly Spanish could not understand one of the managers from Alabama. I would have to translate for her.

  • Member since
    October 2004
  • From: Orlando, Florida
Posted by ikar01 on Saturday, October 2, 2021 6:40 PM

One of my brothers had a strong New England accent and i had trouble understanding him sometimes.  He had never been past N.Y.C. or Penn, until he went to college ouit in N.M.  He took care of the language barrier problem with me.  If I didn't do what he said, he would just knock me down.  

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Saturday, October 2, 2021 9:00 PM

Speaking of 'knocking someone down', I once saw an American sailor call an Auzzie a 'POME' .  .  . for a second there I thought the OZ-man was gonna kill him. I intervened with a fresh beer and probably saved the guys life.

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, October 2, 2021 11:54 PM

I learned a scadinavian language, and a little Finnish.

Coloquialisms were pretty minor.

Romance language speakers from Europe will say that the idioms used in the US are really hard to deal with.

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Sunday, October 3, 2021 2:20 AM

HooYah Deep Sea

Speaking of 'knocking someone down', I once saw an American sailor call an Auzzie a 'POME' .  .  . for a second there I thought the OZ-man was gonna kill him. I intervened with a fresh beer and probably saved the guys life.

 

OPP's

I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so

 

On the bench: Hasegawa 1/72nd Typhoon FGR.4/Airfix 1/72nd Victor K.2

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Sunday, October 3, 2021 10:27 AM

Chicago folks have an interesting accent:

I'll meetcha inda frunchroom. (I'll meet you in the frontroom)

Howyadoin? (How are you doing?)

Gimme ma treewood. ( Give me my three wood)

 

Your comments and questions are always welcome.

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Sunday, October 3, 2021 11:34 AM

I'm from Vermont and went to college on Long Island, everyone there sounded like My Cousin Vinny and Marisa Tomei.

"Yous" short for "you guys" pronounced "use" is the New York version of "you all" or y'all.

If the student was from farther east on the Island like Nassau County or Suffolk County, their accent was less pronounced than those from the border towns of Nassau County and Queens or Brooklyn.

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