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I want something else, how about you?

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  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Canada / Czech Republic
I want something else, how about you?
Posted by upnorth on Wednesday, December 25, 2002 7:14 PM
I make this posting as a result of thoughts I've had while making contributions to the subjects regarding what kits we want to see most and the one about burn out in modeling.

I'm so tired of walking into hobby shops and seeing the shelves littered with the same old modeling subjects. These companies we buy the products of crank out millions of plastic kits per year of various subject matter, but in the end its mostly all the same things or re-issues of old things, or worst of all (in my opinion) is some other company's kit repackaged as if it was something new. I almost bought an Italeri 1/48 F-5 fighter recently, but then found out it was an old Esci kit and gave it a pass.

A number of years ago Academy had a series of 1/48 general aviation kits, a Beech Bonanza and a Cessna Skymaster were part of that line. I heard mixed reviews about those kits, but I must admit thats a subject matter worthy of further exploration by mainstream injection form manufacturers. We shouldn't have to spend an arm and a leg and all of eternity waiting for a limited run resin or vac form kit we had to special order from half way around the world just to have these things on our shelves at home.

There are so many subject matters that are worthy of coverage by mainstream manufacturers that never seem to find their way into being, agricultural and construction vehicles are one example of subjects I've heard many modelers lammenting the inadequate coverage of in our hobby.

Speaking as an aviation nut, I realize the ME-109, P-51, spitfire, Hurricane, Sabre, Phantom... are all classics and worthy of some coverage in the hobby, but they are all overdone by manufacturers. As far as I'm concerned the ICM Spitfire series should have been the last word in 1/48 kits of that aircraft for a long time, they're terrific kits and I can't see anybody being able to improve on them anytime soon, so lets leave that bird alone for a while.

I've been waiting for ages to see a manufacturer recognize the worthiness of the Piaggio P.180 Avanti aircraft for a kit subject. I still wait.

What have you asked for over and over again but never seen? What do you NOT want to see on the shelf for a while? What bores you to tears because you've seen it too often? What would bring you back to your workbench with real passion for the project and the hobby?

  • Member since
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, December 26, 2002 1:40 AM
I HAVE TO AGREE WITH YOU.PERHAPS THIS REASON IS AT THE CORE OF MY "BUILDING BURN OUT".SEEING THE SAME OLD,SAME OLD MAKES ME NOT EVEN WANT TO WALK THE KIT ISLE AT MY LOCAL HOBBY SHOP.NO OFFENCE TO THE WW2 GERMAN ARMOR BUILDERS OUT THERE BUT "HOW MANY DIFFERENT KITS DO YOU NEED".IS THER A PIECE OF ARMOR MADE BY GERMANY IN WW2 THAT SOME ONE HAS NOT MADE A KIT FOR? I MY SELF HAVE A FLAIR FOR THE MORE UNCOMMON PIECES OF MILITARY HARDWARE.I AM JUST SICK OF SCRATCH BUILDING IT.ON THE OTHER HAND. I WORKED FOR A MODEL MANUFACTURER IN CALIFORIA FOR A WHILE.IT COSTS LOTS OF MONEY IN RESEARCE AND MOLD BUILDING.JUST THE FUSALODGE TOOK TWO MONTHS TO MILL DOWN.SO I CAN ALSO UNDERSTAND THAT THE MANUFACTURES ARE IN IT FOR A PROFIT.WHO WANTS TO LOSE MONEY?MAYBE WE SHOULD LOOK AT IT THIS WAY.KITS AND AFTER MARKET PRODUCTS HAVE COME A LONG WAY IN THE LAST 15 YEARS.SO LETS HOPE THINGS GET BETTER....HAVE FUN.........
  • Member since
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  • From: Brisbane, Australia
Posted by ILuv3ggs on Friday, December 27, 2002 5:12 AM
I have to agree with you there. When i go to my local hobby store (especially in the aircraft section) i see the same model after the same model all by different manufactures. The armour section is great tho, i have a hard time choosing just what to model, as the selection is so big.

I am from Australia (living in NZ currently) and i would like to see more kits of Australian vehicles. I know of only one kit that is of an australian vehicle, and thats a fire Support M13something something (i forget what it is exactly) made by trumpeter i believe. Or even if there is a kit of say an American hornett, they have as an extra set of decals that are Australian Markings. I don't have the money, or the experince to be able to scratch build, or convert a model into something thats Australian.

That would be my only complaint about the kits, otherwise they are great.
  • Member since
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  • From: Canada / Czech Republic
Posted by upnorth on Friday, December 27, 2002 5:25 PM
Thanks for tolerating my rant guys :-)

I'm glad to know I'm not the only one lamenting such things.

Yes, I know the research and development is a tremendous economic undertaking, but whatever happened to the old addage: "Nothing wagered, nothing gained"?

I fail to understand the level of fascination with WWII German subject matter that there is in our hobby, yes it should be represented, but I think not to the level that it is. Those models of German "Paper projects" really get under my skin. They were never built! how worthy could they be of a model? Theres plenty of things that did make it into production, or at least operating prototype, that are more worthy of the plastic. I know plenty of modelers who would love to fill out their F-16 line ups with a 1/48 F-16 XL (the delta winged one) but to my knowledge the only kits of that are the old Monogram 1/72 kit that I haven't seen in ages and a 1/144 Airfix kit that I only ever saw once.

As for the Australian subject matter, I remember a number of years ago, someone asked me to build a 1/48 F/A-18 Hornet in Australian markings. Australian Hornets have rarely been represented in kit decal sheets and I had to find some aftermarket decals for it. I finally did find some, but it took months to do.
Some air forces really get a poor representation in kit decals.

To my mind, the best thing thats happened recently in kit releases is Trumpeter's growing line of 1/48 and 1/32 Soviet built aircraft. Its about time some of these aircraft were seen in scale (honestly, what took a MiG-19 so long to get coverage?)

Still, there are gaps to be filled that aftermarket simply won't be able to cover, because aftermarket is for kits that already exist, not ones that could if someone cared to take a chance on the subject matter.
  • Member since
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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, December 28, 2002 11:43 AM
Anytime there is a model kit survey, participate, just like voting, you might influence
what happens. For years I put my selections on a wishlist and it really did get produced. Anything is possible.As far as Eastern Block subjects, peristroika(sp ?)
and the adoption of capitalism have been the difference in the amount of kits that
have come on in the last few years. That's my opinion.

Mark
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, December 30, 2002 3:06 AM
I'm jumping on the bandwagon here. I've been collecting kits for about 30 years and as such I've always paid great attention to new releases by major and cottage industry model manufacturers. A few years ago everybody was releasing 1/48th Bf-109's and Fw-190's like crazy. If there's already an up-to-date and accurate Bf-109E on the market why does someone else have to waste tooling costs on a "new" one that may only be a little bit better??? I believe the resources could have been better spent providing us modellers something not yet represented in kit form or at least "replacing" your own or a competitor's tooling that may be out-of-date. I'm very grageful to the new kit manufacturers in Eastern Europe. The kits may not be of Hasegawa/Tamiya quality, but I absolutely love the new subject matter. And they have not produced a single F-14 Tomcat!

Regards,

Pat
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Posted by Anonymous on Monday, December 30, 2002 12:23 PM
I know exactly where you're coming from!

I've spent the last few years modeling white metal and resin 1/43 cars (Tameo, BBR, Provence Moulge etc.), with a focus on 60's/70's Ferrari race cars. Will the burn out is there, and I've just recently dove back into plastic aircraft which I haven't modeled in YEARS!

So far I've done the Modelcraft Cessna 172 Floatplane and a Hasegawa Junkers Ju82. My current project is the Revell A-10.
The point above, is that I look for diversity.

Although my perspective in aircraft is a fresh one compared to yours, how many Ferrari 250 GTO's can one really model before getting bored?

Although I expect it will take some time with aircraft before I reach that point in this genre, I can completely sympathize with you.

I too would love to see more diversity in any subject range.
  • Member since
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  • From: Canada / Czech Republic
Posted by upnorth on Monday, December 30, 2002 1:28 PM
I had no idea so many modelers could share my sentiments, its good to know I'm not alone.

As for the mentioned survey participation, I use to participate in them quite frequently and I have yet to see one thing I ever suggested make it into injection formed reality. How long did it take from the first request for a 1/32 A-10 in a survey until Trumpeter made it a reality in the past year or so? Years. I've also seen a recuring request for a 1/48 A-5 Vigilante, but to my knowledge, the only ones out there are high priced multi media affairs by Cutting Edge or Collect Aire and really, how many of us can justify those prices for our hobby? Not I.

About five years ago, Airfix gave us some beautiful 1/48 kits of Lightnings and Buccaneers. Both aircraft had been retired from service before those kits came into being. In the past few years they've managed to get an old Sea Vixen interceptor airworthy again in the UK, no disrespect to Dynavector's fine vac form Vixen, but lets hope for an injection one in 1/48 some time soon.

But back to the surveys, yes, they are like elections, more powered by perceptions of what is wanted rather than what is needed. More dependent on conservative traditionalism that goes with what worked in the past rather than a somewhat more liberal view of what is better for the future.

Even if you take the more conservative view and depend on more of the same to keep you safe, there is room for more variety. Think of how many F-4 Phantom kits there are in all popular scales out there, what members of the Phantom family have been given the miss more than any other? The Spey powered ones. I'd love a 1/48 Spey engined Phantom with accurate engraved panel lines, accurate intakes and an accurate cockpit. The Spey Phantoms, like most Phantoms, are gone now, is there still hope for a model of one? Lets also not forget the 27 F-4Es that Australia used for three years in the early 1970s, I don't think there's even been an aftermarket decal sheet made for them.

So many directions to go in, if only someone would.

The next time any of you see a survey for most wanted kits, do the hobby a favour and ask for something you want thats obscure, it might not happen, but at least you went for something you really wanted, not something you thought was a sure bet. Isn't that what elections and democracy are about? The freedom to bypass the big guys and root for the underdog if you want? :-)
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Posted by Anonymous on Monday, December 30, 2002 10:02 PM
Well said upnorth, Yes, it is true that it took awhile for some of those on my wishlist,
but they did make it.
And the manufacturers are listening.
I think that the internet could affect what happens also with message boards,
discussion forums (like this one), Modelling websites and SIG's.

Mark
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 31, 2002 6:48 AM
I wonder if any of the kit manufacturers ever look in on this furum. How 'bout it FSM? Invite those guys to check out what us hard-core modelers have to say! Speaking of waiting for a most wanted kit, I was a very excited 14 year old when Monogram released their 1/72 B-52D in 1968. At the time I fully expected they'd follow up with a 1/72 KC-135. I thought it'd be a natural. Almost any book/magazine covering the B-52 always had a pic of a BUF refuelling from a KC-135. Never dreamed I'd have to wait 30+ years to get one! Right now I'm waiting for the Trumpeter Tu-95MS to arrive at my door. That too has been one loooooong wait!!

Pat
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Canada / Czech Republic
Posted by upnorth on Tuesday, December 31, 2002 3:57 PM
I must say I'm very pleasantly surprized by the favourable responses I've been getting on this matter since I made the initial posting :-)

Perhaps I'll get back into that survey thing again, I still have a 1/72 Avro Shackleton AEW.2 high on my wish list and a 1/48 or 1/32 Beech 17 Staggerwing would be a real treat for me.

Keep the responses coming to this subject, if the manufacturers are indeed reading what we say in this forum, we may convince them to diverge from the ruts they often get into with same old, same old subject matter, even if just a little bit, to show us something trully fresh and unseen in the injection model world.

Alright, Airfix, I love your kits and since I've started this subject in the forum, I've given you hints on three great aircraft that served in Britain's military . 1/48 Sea Vixen, 1/48 Spey Phantom and 1/72 Shackleton AEW.2. All worthy subjects all under represented in the hobby. I don't know anybody who didn't love the 1/48 Lightnings from you a few years ago, don't stop now :-)

Keep all the great comments coming in folks, our wanted subjects and the plastic for them are out there, lets get the manufacturers to bring them together as we've never seen them before in the hobby.
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Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 31, 2002 10:05 PM
It is a good topic, and I did not mention what I'd like to be produced. Lets go with the AH-64 Apache, AH-1G Cobra in 1/35 scale. So many things could be done with this scale.Maybe some of the armor guys would build aircraft?

Mark
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Canada / Czech Republic
Posted by upnorth on Thursday, January 2, 2003 12:52 PM
You're very right about aircraft in 1/35, it doesn't have to be "rotorheads" only though.

Even conventional aircraft that work closely with armour would be good here. Would any self respecting armour modeler who wanted to take a shot at an aircraft turn down a 1/35 OV-1 Mohawk or an OV-10 Bronco? I would hope not.

If they're into WW II, wouldn't they like to set up a diorama in 1/35 of a Typhoon or a P-47 bearing down on a Panzer column?

Oh the possibilities :-)
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, January 2, 2003 10:06 PM
Speaking of surveys, I just found out that Large scale Planes website are conducting their annual survey. They said the last survey was well received by the manufacturers. Here is the link: http://kithobbyist.com/largescaleplanes/
Let's get out there and vote !

Mark
  • Member since
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  • From: Canada / Czech Republic
Posted by upnorth on Saturday, January 4, 2003 4:26 PM
Thanks for the tip!

Just so this column isn't a total downer 100% of the time, I'd like to deviate from my laments of what is not and share a happy experience of what is.

I was in one of my local hobby shops a couple of hours ago and my eyes wandered across a 1/48 Cessna 172 by Modelcraft.

How the most produced and popular general aviation bird has avoided widespread coverage in our hobby is a mystery to me. Perhaps because, as aircraft go, the 172 is as common as pigeons is why we don't see it in kits too often.

Whatever the reason, its certainly a significant and worthy bird and was a most welcome sight to my tired hobby shop eyes!

Anybody know if anybody ever put the Cessna 190 into kit form?

Any day you can celebrate more than lament is a good one in my books. :-)

Still, there is much to be done, and much yet to be represented. Keep your comments coming, I read them all with great intrest and enthusiasm.
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Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, January 4, 2003 9:38 PM
As an aircraft mechanic working in general aviaton,I obviously would like to see lots more models representing this section of aviation. No a Cessna 172 is not as sexy as a P-51 or F-15 to most people. But I do think a good quality recent kit of one would catch a lot of peoples eye. Considering that there are something like 20,000 general aviation aircraft registered in the U.S., to me that sounds like a lot of subject matter. Many pilots developed an interest in aircraft when they were kids building, you guessed it, models! I know that I may be not be be the most objective person in this group to comment but hey a person can try.

I have built the Cessna 152, 172 and 337. Also the Beechcraft Bonanza and Piper Cheroke 140. All kits were of poor quality. But I figure that it gave me more to do. Or at least thats what I told myself.

Darren
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  • From: Canada / Czech Republic
Posted by upnorth on Tuesday, January 7, 2003 7:12 PM
Hey folks!

In an endeavor to keep this thread and the subject it relates to fresh in the minds of ALL modelers and close to the surface in the General Modeling Discussion bracket, I think we have to bend it back towards the center line of the modeling freeway so all modelers will feel welcome regardless of their subject matter preferences.

I've noticed that since I've started this discussion, I've managed to drive it in a distincly aviation bias (I confess, I'm a "wingnut") in spite of the fact that I started it for every modeler with unfulfiled wishes regarding model kits.

How many of you have stood there and wondered, while you were staring at that hobby shop wall of "same old same old", why, after September 11, modelers were not drowned in a sea of new model kits focusing on all manner of emergency response vehicles from most mainstream model manufacturers? Instead we see some reissues of older kits of combat aircraft with the only change being made is decals pertaining to the "Enduring Freedom" military campaign.

Surely, I thought we'd see a whole new genre of model kit subject matter born after that fateful day.

If I saw a reissued fighter plane model with decals saluting the heroism of those currently involved in "Enduring Freedom" and a model of a fire engine in New York City Fire Department Markings in respect to those fire fighters who perished "That others may live", I can say for certain, "wingnut" that I am, the hobby shop could keep the plane, that fire engine would be going out of the hobby shop under my arm that day. If there was a model of a New York City fire engine produced for such reasons, I never saw it.

What sort of vehicles are around you everyday, used by your city or town for road maintenance. My city would be shut down most winters if it weren't for snowploughs and sanding trucks, the snow and ice would be impassible without them. City busses might seem a very plain and unremarkable thing, but to those without the luxury of a car, they mean a lot.

Really think about it, what vehicles, beyond your car if you've got one, affect your life the most. If you had to be rushed to a hospital in the middle of the night, what sort of vehicle would you be more thankful for, an ambulance or a main battle tank? If you ski and got injured or lost on a mountain, what would be more use to you, a mountain rescue helicopter or an Apache gunship?

There's a lot around us everyday, a lot of heroes with revolving lights and sirens rather than smart bombs and vulcan cannons, that we end up taking for granted somehow. Are their vehicles somehow less worthy because they are civilians, I hardly think so.

What about you? Where would you be without our non military heroes?

I think they're worthy of our plastic, don't you?

Lets hear from you
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Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, January 7, 2003 8:33 PM
ok, your a wingnut im a treadhead. ill mix it up. lets get a full line of WWI armored vehicles from tanks to cars with steelplating and an MG. They are so simply made back then, scaling them would make one of the most interesting things. Almost no WWI kits are out there. I want to make a WWI dio but I cant scratchbuild and i dont want a 1/72 scale that comes with base like the ones out there which are bad too. I want a Mark VI.In fact how bout thefirst real tank. its from the 1600's it qualifies, guns (of cours single slow and crud) with a horse in the middle that is under a wooden shell. i want the history of tanks representied in a bunch of kits.



im not spellchecking it, you deal with it sry
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Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, January 7, 2003 9:39 PM
This is a very good discussion. I'm glad to see it remaining active.

I have to wonder about fire engine kits and why there may be a lack of kits. Would you think there would be enough interest in the subject to warrant new kits being issued? I do think that after 9/11 there would have been an opportunity to sell more firefighting related kits. However, I wonder if the manufacturers were relunctant to rush new kits to the market in fear that people might accuse them of trying to take advantage of the recent tragic events? Then there's the time to put the kits into production, etc. and would there still be an interest by that time? Also, with the range of firefighting equipment, how would they determine which ones to put into production?

If the manufacturers made them, would the hobby stores stock them? Would the store owners feel there would be enough interest to stock these kits? How many people have asked store owners about these types of kits?

All of that aside, I do agree that it would be nice to see more kits devoted to everyday heroes. The subject of firefighting equipment appears to be rather sparse. While the demand may not be as high as warplanes, warships, etc., I'm sure the demand would be there. If not from firefighters themselves (my father-in-law is a full-time firefighter and avid collector of related stuff), then from their families and others who have great respect for these heroes.

Oh, by the way...looking through Revell-Monogram's new kit releases for 2002, there was one fire engine. Wink [;)]

American Heroes Combination Kit

It would have been nice to see a NY edition fire engine.
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Posted by upnorth on Wednesday, January 8, 2003 5:43 PM
Thanks for agreeing with me on this matter of everyday vehicles.

On the matter of demand for certain subjects in kits, would shops stock them and so forth; this would be a good time to draw your attention back to the earlier matter in this thread about wanted kit surveys being like elections. The perceptions versus the facts.

I think its a big part of human nature to not want to be seen as being out of step with "popular opinion" to not want to be the disenting voice if you will.

Suppose your'e sitting at your breakfast table one morning and thinking how thankful you should be that in this day and age of technology, there are still those who engage in the age old vocation of grain farming. There would be no bread for toast or any cereal in your bowl without them continuing their profession.

Then suppose you're thankful enough for this that you get to thinking that a combine or swather would have a worthy place on your model shelf.( I have been in a number of lively hobby shop discussions with many modelers that would love to see some agricultural subjects in scale form.) Whats keeping you from speaking up? Afraid you'll be laughed at by your fellow modelers?

Do you not speak of it because you percieve that you may be the only one who wants to see these things in scale?I'm constantly surprized when I get fellow modelers talking about this subject, once they get comfortable talking about it and know I won't laugh at them, I find that I'm not half as alone as I thought I was when it comes to wishing for a certain subject in scale.

Open your mouths and say it folks, thats the only way it will ever influence anyone enough to stand a chance of being done.

Conservatism in anything leads to stagnation of it. I love this hobby and I don't want to see it fade out because it kept slipping into ruts from going down the same old road too often.

Look at your carpets, why are they worn more in some places than others? Those are the places you find yourself in, are you in those places because you have to be, or are you in them because you choose to be?

Our hobby can be like that carpet, its got big worn patches from over representations of certain subjects (the ME-109 patch is almost down to the floor boards) while the pile is still like new in the untried areas (emergency response vehicles a case in point).

Its easy to "go with what you know" there's no risk involved, its a sure thing. Problem is, how much headway does that really get you? How much progress is this hobby of ours really making when it relies so heavily on what has worked in the past? Sure, there are some subjects that will always sell, perenial favorites, but how did they get their status as our favorites in the hobby? Somebody had to make the first kit of it, somebody had to be the first to take the chance on giving it scale representation.

Dare to ask for these things and ask for them often.

"Nothing will come from nothing"

"Nothing ventured, nothing gained"

Keep this thread alive and at the surface, I check it every day!

Keep the comments coming
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Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, January 8, 2003 6:21 PM
Right. Hey guys.........did I mention WWI? Well if I didnt I am now.......................
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, January 9, 2003 9:21 AM
I definitely agree with this.
Every hobby shop I have been to has the same old models of the same old aircraft. It took a LONG time for some aircraft to finally see plastic like the British Lightning, and the Buccaneer, I'm still waiting for something different. Although some models that out as of late are worth building, like an all new Mig-15 from Tamiya or theit He-219, a real nice kit.
I feel that the Modeler should have a voice not the A-hole in the suit that says what should make into a kit. The Bf-109 has been done to death and so has the P-51 why not a AM-1 Mauler in 1/48? Tamiya decided to be bold and daring by putting out a couple of overlooked subjects like the He-219 or whatever esle.
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Posted by upnorth on Thursday, January 9, 2003 5:32 PM
O.K. First, in respect to Col. Kurtz and WWI. Yes, you did mention it and I appologize for not addressing it in my bit from yesterday. I happen to agree that WWI is under represented in the hobby, most kits seem to be multimedia affairs that cost an arm and a leg. I saw a model in 1/35 of one of those MK.IV tanks you spoke of initially not that long ago in a hobby shop. Even as the consignment item that it was, it commanded a price of over $300 Canadian. It was a combination of white metal and photoetched components, soldering would have been the only way to get that one together. (Welding classes weren't in my future plans)

The interwar period is also very much overlooked. Some of the most significant advances in technology in the 20th Century occured there. The interwar period saw the transition from biplanes to monoplanes. It also saw the birth of fuel injection systems in engines and notions such as "turbochargers" in engines. A very dynamic and exciting time in the development of motorized vehicles on the ground, in the air, and on the waves in both civilian and military circles.

A few years back, the hobby saw a noticeable crop of A-1 Skyraider kits in both 1/72 and 1/48 scales from various manufacturers. The A-1 would never rate as my all time favorite aircraft, but it was under done in kit form until that time. I really think AMT took the biggest chance in that lot (and the most commendable) when they released their 1/48 kit of a Royal Navy Skraider rigged up for electronic warfare operations in the Suez Crisis. Unfortunately I was unable to buy it as I was between jobs at the time (hope for a reissue on that one).

The "suits" don't know it all, in fact a lot of times they don't know much. Its like letting someone who isn't a regular user of public transit make up a city's bus routes and schedules, they don't have a clue a lot of the time and they quite often miss the mark entirely. A city's main traffic arteries may be the easiest and most reliable places to place busses, but they are by far not the only places in the city that need serviced.

WWII German subjects may be one of this hobby's easiest and most dependable genres to release new kits into, but its an over serviced and congested area of the hobby that could do well with a reduction in service so we can accomodate some other area of the modeling metropolis.

Just like any city, our hobby has an infrastructure to service and all areas must be attended to. What happens when an area of a city gets ignored or marginalized? It becomes a slum and certain stigmas (often very ignorant ones) get formed in the general populace about its residents. What happens when another area gets over serviced? It becomes used to the attention and becomes more demanding of its wants and desires being met, quite frequently at the expense of less served people in the city.

Yes, you WWII Germany builders certainly get the spoils a lot of the time both in the variety of full kits and aftermarket items, weather you build armour, aircraft, ships or figures, you're in this hobby's "Lap of luxury" and yet some of you still ask for more.

Meanwhile, those of us in the "lower class" general aviation neighborhoods still wait our turn for the modeling metropolis city council to attend to us. Must we move into your rut to get seen and heard?

As I said in my previous peice: Conservatism leads to stagnation, a degradation of things, a loss of the overall dynamic that keeps things alive and healthy. A stiring up of the status quo keeps thing going. There is no such thing as standing still, you're either progressing and moving forward or regressing into some safely predictable corner of your known realm.

If you've built enough BF-109s and Tiger tanks that you could build them with your eyes closed, whats the point? where is your progress? where is your dynamic? How often can you send yourself down the same old roads without getting so neurotic that you need a straitjacket?

Something to think about there.

  • Member since
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  • From: Brisbane, Australia
Posted by ILuv3ggs on Thursday, January 9, 2003 6:34 PM
I also have to agree that there is alot of subject matter that could be modeled Between the Wars. For instance the Supermarine S6B S1595 - This aircraft won the Schneider Trophy for Britian in 1931. Or how about the de Havilland Comet which won the England-Australia air race - I will visist a hobby store at any chance i get, and i have never seen a kit on these aircraft (but that doesn't mean there isn't one)

Or what about the unusal (for its time) Cierva Autogiro. I have visited many hobby stores and haven't seen any models of these.

These were planes that won races and broke records, or were very unusual...I for one would like to model all three of the above aircraft....

Anyways, more laters,
Later Days
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Posted by upnorth on Thursday, January 9, 2003 6:46 PM
Airfix had an S6B in 1/72 but it was years ago and I've never seen it come back.

I seem to recall (very foggy) a 1/48 autogyro made by either Glencoe or Williams Brothers, but again that was years ago.

If anybody ever takes the mind to produce a 1/48 Ford Trimotor, they'll be seeing some of my money :-)
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, January 9, 2003 8:44 PM
yeah upnorth, just a little sarcasm, with u wingnuts dominating. just a koke, good thread. hers is some unrelated stuff (it still counts).
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Posted by upnorth on Saturday, January 11, 2003 11:08 AM
Glad you like the thread Col.Kurtz, Sarcasm isn't always a bad thing, in fact, when used right, its often a catalyst for getting things done.

I started this thread so something might get done that needed to be done. Hopefully the manufacturers are paying visits to it and you and everyone else who has spoken up here will hammer the message home to them.

Keep hammering folks

As for the manufacturers, if you have visited this thread, say so. let us know you visited, let us know you give a damn.
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Canada / Czech Republic
Posted by upnorth on Sunday, January 12, 2003 2:43 PM
O.K. folks,

We've covered a lot of ground and established that indeed there are many areas of the modeling hobby that deserve the attentions of mainstream manufacturers.

First World War, Interwar period, civilian subjects of nearly every description... but what else is there? In short, Tons.

I'd love to take a crack at some real space subject matter. The mainstream manufacturers have, to some degree, given it attention, but most of the kits out there are the high priced multi media stuff that I can't justify throwing my money at when its just a hobby.

What about the human machine itself? Any of you remember the Revell Visible Man and Visible Woman kits? I loved the concept, but the kits needed a lot of work. I remember building, or trying to build, a re-issue of the Visible Woman recently. All I could think was, "Can you imagine what these kits could be like using current medical imaging technologies to create them?"

When those kits first hit the market, things like the CAT scan and MRIs were the stuff of science fiction. Today they are real and commonplace. If someone tried to produce kits like that today, they'd be absolute masterpieces! I'd love to see one of the mainstream companies try that sort of thing again with todays medical technology to help them ( and make the kits at least half again as big as the old Revell ones, bigger size for better details!)

I'd also love to see Airfix re-issue, or update their old 1/144 SRN-4 hovercraft.

What other trully oddball stuff can you think of that you'd like to see in plastic?
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, January 14, 2003 8:49 AM
I am late with my comment ,however I could not agree more.
My personnal obsession is flying boats; any kind, any era any scale. I have compiled over the years a list of all flying boats ever manufactured with their corresponding available kits , let me tell you there are a lot of possibilities. Some of these are of historically significant aircrafts produced in quantities by well-known companies but never released in kit.

Granted some of these have been released by limited-run basement type kit producers, but these are getting hard to track down or out of my price range.

So yes I want something else and now you know, but I am afraid my list is too long for this post. There I feel better already!
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Canada / Czech Republic
Posted by upnorth on Tuesday, January 14, 2003 1:24 PM
Better late than never, Louis!

I have to agree the flying boats are a rarity in mainstream manufacturers catalogs. I personally would love a Shorts Mayo Composite in 1/72. A Shorts Sunderland MK.III in 1/48 would be even better.

Yet one more thing for the mainstream manufacturers to consider.

Keep em' coming!
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