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Cutting Resin parts

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  • Member since
    November, 2016
Cutting Resin parts
Posted by Gerhard on Friday, March 17, 2017 6:44 AM

I understand that stuff like an ejection seat will have to be cut off the casting block using a saw or a Dremmel of sorts, but can thinner parts like headrest , control sticks etc be cut off using sprue cutters?? Then cleaned up with a file.

 

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Norwich, Norfolk, Nelson's County. Exiled in Suffolk.
Posted by Bish on Friday, March 17, 2017 7:10 AM

Yes, i use cutters for parts with thin attachment points. But be careful, those parts are brittle and will break easier than plastic.

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  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, March 17, 2017 11:10 AM

The safe way to cut it off with plenty of casting block left on, then draw sand on a flat surface to clean it up.

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Friday, March 17, 2017 11:39 AM

Gerhard

I understand that stuff like an ejection seat will have to be cut off the casting block using a saw or a Dremmel of sorts, but can thinner parts like headrest , control sticks etc be cut off using sprue cutters?? Then cleaned up with a file.

I wouldn't use a Dremel or other rotary tool at all, when cutting anything, resin bits from their casting blocks, plastic parts from sprues, or metal bits.  It is too easy to slip and damage the piece.

Sprue cutters work, but I would also use either a very fine razor saw, or a sharp Nr 11 blade, and either cut as close to the pouring stub as possible, or as GMorrison said in the previous post, cut up further on the pouring block and then sand the remaining bit down using the draw-sanding method.

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  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, March 18, 2017 9:22 AM

One tip on using a modeler's saw, like a Zona or X-acto.  These fine saws have very little clearance worked into the teeth, so friction is quite high.  The friction is enough to definitely melt styrene, and even melts resin a bit, which increases the friction.  I find lubricating the blade with water helps.  Never lubricate with an oil- it is hard to get completely off of plastics and will contaminate the paint.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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