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Gluing Small Parts

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  • Member since
    April, 2017
Gluing Small Parts
Posted by Mark Steele on Thursday, April 13, 2017 3:26 PM

I'm building some Trumpeter 1:350 naval aircraft for my USS Enterprise build.

Some parts are really, really small like the vertical stabilizers on the C-2A(R) Greyhound.

What type of glue is best for these small parts to prevent the part from shifting / leaning while the glue dries.

Thanks in advance!

Mark

On the Workbench:

Tamiya 1:350 USS Enterprise (CVN-65)

Kinetic 1:48 C-2A(R) Greyhound

Kitty Hawk 1:32 T-28B

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Thursday, April 13, 2017 4:51 PM

As long as the part is not yet painted, some of the "hotter" liquid cements like Tenax or Plastruct will take effect more quickly. But parts can still be knocked out of alignment while those glues set. CA glues work very quickly, but give very little time for part alignment before they set. But, due to their properties, on smaller contact areas, may not provide as secure of a bond.

 

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  • Member since
    September, 2013
Posted by Marcus McBean on Thursday, April 13, 2017 6:31 PM

 

Tamiya makes a extra thin that is quick setting.  It dries so fast that at times it was dry before I could get the glue to the part.  Look for Tamiya extra thin quick setting.

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Sydney, Australia
Posted by Phil_H on Thursday, April 13, 2017 7:09 PM

Take care when using any of the thin liquid cements. They work best when the parts to be joined are held together and the glue is applied to the joint. If you apply the glue to a part and then try to press the parts together, you may find as described above, that the glue has dried before you can get the parts together, resulting in a poor bond.

When the glue is applied to the joint, physics takes over and capillary action will draw the glue along the seam. If you're not careful, it will also follow any seam or panel lines, possibly finding its way under fingertips and making a huge mess. A little goes a long way.

The aforementioned Tamiya extra thin cements (which now come in "regular" and "quick setting" formulas) have a very fine-pointed brush applicator which helps in getting the glue exactly where it's needed, but take care not to overload the brush.

  • Member since
    October, 2006
  • From: Lakewood, CO
Posted by kenjitak on Thursday, April 13, 2017 9:00 PM

Touch-N-Flow applicator could be a big help.

Ken

  • Member since
    November, 2016
Posted by Gerhard on Friday, April 14, 2017 5:06 AM

Place the part where it needs to be, and then just a touch of Tamiya Extra thin. It uses cappilary action and flows around the part. Press down lightly with a tweezer for a few secomds. Job done.

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Friday, April 14, 2017 6:07 AM

Actually, what you have described is just about the only situation left in which I still use good old-fashioned tube glue. It's ideal for tiny parts that have virtually no weight...an easily-controllable amount can be applied with, say, a toothpick...and the part 'stuck' cleanly in place.

The downside, obviously, is that it's pretty slow-setting...so the assembled parts must be protected from 'accidental' knocking or movement. I put mine in one of those hinge-top plastic 'craft' storage boxes...though a cardboard box, or shallow kitchen storage container, would do jut as well.

Just my $.02....

Greg

 

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."

 

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  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, April 14, 2017 8:41 AM

stikpusher

As long as the part is not yet painted, some of the "hotter" liquid cements like Tenax or Plastruct will take effect more quickly. But parts can still be knocked out of alignment while those glues set. CA glues work very quickly, but give very little time for part alignment before they set. But, due to their properties, on smaller contact areas, may not provide as secure of a bond.

 


Gel CA, sometimes called thick CA, fulfills two purposes.  One, it is slower setting (several minutes), to give time to align carefully.  Second, it is gap filling, and useful for when the contact areas are not perfectly smooth, increasing the contact area.  On plastic models, it is my go-to glue.  And, when you have the parts aligned, you can treat the joint with CA accelerator fluid, which then sets the glue almost instantly.

I do keep regular CA on hand, for those few joints on a plastic kit that have truly matched, flat contact areas.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Friday, April 14, 2017 9:17 AM

Hi Mark !

 I specifically use Tamiya Extra Thin Quick setting . I went to it eight years ago and don't regret the shift from Testors liquid . I still use C.A. and Testors and my favorite C.A.( the one in the oval bottle with the Hobby Shop name on it .) but my chosen is the Tamiya .I have found on 1/700 ( Gasp ! ) ships , this is the best . Especially on the small parts ! T.B.

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