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I need the formula to calculate scale.

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  • Member since
    March, 2005
I need the formula to calculate scale.
Posted by philo426 on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 9:43 AM

I just picked up the Lindberg 1/72 Betty and it seems kind of small,I fear it may be one of those box scale releases of the sixties and I want to check if it is truly 1./72.Thanks for any info in advance.

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 10:03 AM

Well, the Betty is a medium size bomber and basically a torpedo bomber. Each WW2 nationality bombers are not all alike in size. So, as small as it seem to you it is about right for 1/72 scale.

  • Member since
    March, 2005
Posted by philo426 on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 10:13 AM

Ok thanks.

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: From the Mit, but live in Mason, O high ho
Posted by hogfanfs on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 10:36 AM

1 inch will equal 6 feet in 1/72 scale. I've been looking for a chart for all the scales, but can't seem to find one. Hope this helps a little.

 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2012
  • From: Barrie, Ontario
Posted by Cdn Colin on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 10:48 AM

According to Wikipedia, the real Betty was 65'6" long, or 786".  1/72 of that would be a hair over 10.9".  If your kits fuselage is just under 11", it's probably 1/72 scale.

I build 1/48 scale WW2 fighters.

Have fun.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 10:51 AM

According to Wiki, the plane had an 82 ft. wingspan. Divided by 72, that equals 1.138 ft.

In inches, that's about 13 1/2".

 

  • Member since
    March, 2017
  • From: Mid Michigan
Posted by shamoo on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 2:34 PM

As a side note, there are hobby scale calculator apps that are free and work well. I use one for iPhone called model scaler

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: From the Mit, but live in Mason, O high ho
Posted by hogfanfs on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 2:38 PM
  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 3:56 PM

Aww, come on - that's really not rocket science. And the formula is basically all before your eyes. If the box says 1:72, you take the one measurement that suits you (wingspan, fuselage length) and divide it by 72. There you go. Of course it's easier to do in metric units - when you start with so and so many yards, so and so many feet, so and so many inches it gets confusing - so just convert the measurement to inches and after the division the result will also be in inches. Anybody who has finished the primary school should be able to do that. Hope it helps, have a nice day

PaweĊ‚

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, September 20, 2017 1:03 AM

I envy the metric system. We use it for money, comparative analysis and just about everything except distance and temperature.

Folks ask, "why does Heller do 1/400 when it is so close to 1/350?".

1/350 of what?

I'm an american architect so I have all of the conversions pretty much memorized. I tend to work in inches and their decimals. Fractions of inches are devlish things. If a 'foot" is divided by twelve, why is the result of that division divided by eight?

One reason that I suspect the Betty seems small in the box is because it is a thin aircraft. The actual thing was quite a bit wider and longer than an HE-111, but that one would never be considered a thin looking aircraft.

  • Member since
    March, 2005
Posted by philo426 on Wednesday, September 20, 2017 9:45 AM

Ok guys,I took your advice and it looks like the dimensions are correct for 1/72.Thanks for the replies!

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