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Newbie attempt at seam filling

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  • Member since
    September, 2017
Newbie attempt at seam filling
Posted by MrDave on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 5:45 PM

https://www.use.com/NVByQ

 1st, Hopefully my image will display by using Use.com

2nd, I am filling these seams with Tamiya Liquid Surface Primer G.  I have applied several layers with a brush.  I have let it dry over night.  Most of the "deeper" seams seem to require several applications.

Is this normal?  

Thanks.
In Him
Mr. Dave

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 5:59 PM

Perfect Plastic Putty requires one application. Apply, let dry for an hour or two and sand.

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Pineapple Country, Queensland, Australia
Posted by Wirraway on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 6:45 AM
Of course there are purists who maintain that you don't need to use putty on seams. Letting the glue soften the plastic before pushing the parts together will produce a line of melted plastic which is scraped off with a hobby knife and sanded. Wing roots are a different kettle of fish, I do use putty there.

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  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 8:39 AM

With solvent based putties, it does take several coats of putty to fill some seams.  The putty shrinks as it sets.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 2:06 PM

I also vote for Perfect Plastic Putty, being that it's not solvent based I find it has far less shrinkage. I work it well into the seams with a metal spatula, then run a thin bead over that, to compensate for any minor shrinkage that may occur.

Usually one application does it, and it sands really easily.

Patrick

  • Member since
    May, 2015
Posted by Griffin25 on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 2:43 PM

Your USE photo is a link to the photo not the picture itself BTW. You have to click on Generate HTML & Image Code below the pic and then choose/copy Images For Message Boards then paste that into your post. 

  • Member since
    September, 2017
Posted by MrDave on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 2:45 PM

Thanks for the confirmation.  I have used PPP and liked that I could use water to clean up the seam and wipe the excess away.  Very little sanding.  I am still in my learning curve as to what works and what doesn't.  Of course now I am faced with a lot of sanding.

Thanks again!

Thanks.
In Him
Mr. Dave

AT6
  • Member since
    December, 2005
  • From: Fresno
Posted by AT6 on Thursday, October 19, 2017 12:57 AM

I've started useing Spackle as my filler on wing roots and and with a little Future as a sealer seems to work.

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Tuesday, October 24, 2017 5:01 PM

Wirraway

Of course there are purists who maintain that you don't need to use putty on seams.

I wouldn't say someone's a purist, if he prefers one method or another to deal with a seam.  I use both methods-the "squeeze" method with liquid styrene cement, and putty-Squadron white, thinned with acetone.  It depends on the situation.  Whichever works for anyone, is best for him.

I also use stretched sprue, or even scraps of styrene card stock, and liquid cement, depending on the size of the seam, or gap.

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  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by modelmaker66 on Wednesday, October 25, 2017 5:22 PM

the Baron
 
Wirraway

Of course there are purists who maintain that you don't need to use putty on seams.

 

 

I wouldn't say someone's a purist, if he prefers one method or another to deal with a seam.  I use both methods-the "squeeze" method with liquid styrene cement, and putty-Squadron white, thinned with acetone.  It depends on the situation.  Whichever works for anyone, is best for him.

I also use stretched sprue, or even scraps of styrene card stock, and liquid cement, depending on the size of the seam, or gap.

 

I'll Second that! Well said Baron

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Thursday, October 26, 2017 11:22 AM

Hi !, Mr.Dave ;

  I do somethng most don't , I add a little Sprue Glue to each joint .Wait a few and then squish the whole thing together . The Sprue -Glue is the same color as the plastic  ,so .When I get to trimming and sanding there's no seam left !

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Thursday, October 26, 2017 11:58 AM

Tanker - Builder

Hi !, Mr.Dave ;

  I do somethng most don't , I add a little Sprue Glue to each joint .Wait a few and then squish the whole thing together . The Sprue -Glue is the same color as the plastic  ,so .When I get to trimming and sanding there's no seam left !

 

Tb how do you make your sprue glue? I have tried liquid cement with small sprue pieces to melt them  but no good results.

  • Member since
    March, 2005
Posted by philo426 on Thursday, October 26, 2017 12:55 PM

I use Bondo automotuve spot putty,I dip the tube in warm water and apply it with a small flat bladed screwdriver.I tape on either side of the seam to a low me to smooth it on and peel back the tape to remove the excess puttty.when it is dry, I wet sand it with 320 grit sandpaper,one application is usually enough.

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: Chesapeake VA
Posted by out04 on Thursday, October 26, 2017 1:28 PM

I use Bondo spot putty, Tamiya white putty, Squadron green putty, medium CA, Mr. Surfacer 500, or melted styrene (with MEK) when I need to rescribe.

Some require multiple applications, especially when the gap is deep.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Friday, October 27, 2017 3:26 PM

Ah ! P.J.

 Here's what I do . I take a New bottle of Tamiya green label and put half or more , Maybe three quarters in a different bottle . Then I take the remaining glue and cut sprue and put it directly in the left-over New Glue . There is this .You must stirr occassionally for at least the first week . Don't expect it to liquify immediately .

 When it's about the thickness of Natural maple syrup or Honey you are there . Now if you want thicker , just add more sprue . The shelf life is about a year or more , in a 60  or 70 degree dark cool spot .( inside a cabinet ) .

 Note :

 You cannot and should NOT expect to glue parts together with this . It is a styrene glue and plastic Filler . It's is , after all made from the very plastic your models are made from .The nice part ? You can even do it in clear ! 

 I got in the habit of making a lot of grey because of the grey that planes and many model cars are made from . No off color filler that way .

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Friday, October 27, 2017 9:26 PM

Thanks TB I'll give it a try!

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