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3D printing roughness?

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  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: hamburg michigan
3D printing roughness?
Posted by fermis on Friday, October 27, 2017 1:38 PM

I've ordered a couple 3D printed items, and they're a bit rough (texture). 

Aside from sanding, is there a better way to smooth things out? IIRC...I think someone had mentioned some simple trick, wipe down with some chemical(???)...I just can't remember what, or where I heard/read it.

The intracacies of these things are not very conducive to making sanding any kind of easy!

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: 37deg 40.13' N 95deg 29.10'W
Posted by scottrc on Friday, October 27, 2017 1:56 PM

Since these are sintered, they may feel dusty and tacky.  Shapeways gave me instructions to let the parts sit in the sun for while to let the material finish its UV cure, then spray the parts down with something like Simple Green or dish detergent, scrub with a soft bristled toothbrush, rinse good with luke warm water, and dry them with a hairdryer in low heat.  

  • Member since
    July, 2016
Posted by D. Lindsey on Friday, October 27, 2017 5:53 PM

An air eraser works well. Got mine from Harbor Frieght. Like a mini sandblaster that you shoot baking soda through. 

Denny 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, October 28, 2017 9:17 AM

Some primers, especially those made for auto body work, are very thick.  They are intended to cover minor scratches and blemishes from sanding and fillers, so they have a lot of body.  They can hide fine detail a bit, but for priming 3D printing I think they would be ideal.  Just haven't tried it myself yet.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: hamburg michigan
Posted by fermis on Saturday, October 28, 2017 6:26 PM

Don Stauffer

Some primers, especially those made for auto body work, are very thick.  They are intended to cover minor scratches and blemishes from sanding and fillers, so they have a lot of body.  They can hide fine detail a bit, but for priming 3D printing I think they would be ideal.  Just haven't tried it myself yet.

 

 

I was kinda thinkin about that myself.

One piece in particular, is quite rough. The layers are clearly visible and the thing feels about like 150 grit sandpaper. This material doesn't sand very well either. The piece is large enough, I think I can get away with layering a paint/primer without losing detail.

scottrc

Since these are sintered, they may feel dusty and tacky.  Shapeways gave me instructions to let the parts sit in the sun for while to let the material finish its UV cure, then spray the parts down with something like Simple Green or dish detergent, scrub with a soft bristled toothbrush, rinse good with luke warm water, and dry them with a hairdryer in low heat.  

 

I got these through Shapeways. Two items are done in a soft-ish, almost clear material...these ones aren't all that bad. The larger piece is a solid white material and the texture is far beyond just some surface dust/grit.

D. Lindsey

An air eraser works well. Got mine from Harbor Frieght. Like a mini sandblaster that you shoot baking soda through. 

 

Not a bad idea...but I really don't need another piece of "equipment" taking my money and what little space I have left!Propeller

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: 37deg 40.13' N 95deg 29.10'W
Posted by scottrc on Sunday, October 29, 2017 9:24 AM

Since the large parts were layer deposited instead of sintered, then go to step two as Don suggested and depend on the primer to fill the "deposited layers".  I was referred to use Tamiya Mr Surfacer on my 1/700 scale Enterprise island and it worked good.  Because of the tight space in between the details, I used sanding sticks, a soft toothbrush, and Q-Tips to clean the surfaces.  

  • Member since
    September, 2011
  • From: Milaca, Minnesota
Posted by falconmod on Monday, October 30, 2017 6:45 AM

You can try brushing on acetone or lacquer thinner on the part, thet will melt down the ridges, just be careful not to use to much

John

On the Bench: 1/72 Amodel I-270, 1/72 Heller Lansen J.32

Italeri 1/72 Mirage 2000C

  • Member since
    May, 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Monday, October 30, 2017 6:07 PM

Besides sanding intricate parts, there is nothing I can think of to remedy a rough part.  The stuff from 3-D printing companies have not impressed me until today, when I got a replacement docking bay for the Zvezda Imperial Star Destroyer from Falcon 3D.  The lighting in my office isn't great, but from what I can see, the part looks practically paint-ready, which is an achievement IMHO.  I'll have to scruitinize the parts under the glare of my workbench light to make a final call, but they look promising.

https://flic.kr/p/ZTF5Xm] [/url]Falcon 3D-ISD Bay-02 by N.T. Izumi, on Flickr

So I think it is down to the printing outfit's machines that will determine the quality or lack thereof of the resulting parts.  3-D printing technology is still evolving, so we are in a time of transition where quality and price are improving every year.

  • Member since
    April, 2005
Posted by ddp59 on Monday, October 30, 2017 6:28 PM

aa guns i get from this link www.3dmodelparts.com/ almost look like they come from plastic injection moldsb as some of the flat surfaces of the parts are shiny smooth.

  • Member since
    June, 2015
Posted by djflyer on Wednesday, November 15, 2017 10:12 AM
If you're still working on this there are a couple things you can use. Pieces printed in WSF need to be sealed before painting/finishing. You can do this with the very thin superglue, Smooth-On makes a product just for sealing, or a product like Thompsons Water Seal. I've had great results with the super glue method. Sealed and sanded an entire 24th scale car body in less than 10 minutes - apply the super glue, spread out using a stiff card, let it dry and sand with 400+ grit sponge. Then its on to prime and paint as usual.

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