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Monogram Ford Tri Motor build

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  • Member since
    October, 2017
Monogram Ford Tri Motor build
Posted by Jay Bones on Monday, October 30, 2017 7:51 PM

Trying to make the most realistic build of this kit.

 

The skin is made of corrugated metal, and the leading edge of the wings is difficult to get a smooth seam.  Traditional methods of trying to minimize the edges won't works since it's corrugated.

I've tried thin glue along the edges, and it's either too thin and doesn't hold or it's too thick and softens the plastic too much.

Also tried Bondo, which works well, but theres a noticeable gap in the corrugations.  And white tub caulk.  Same problem there.

Ideally I would like to be able to have a tight line where the corrugations line up (they do fine before gluing up).

Also, I know there's some trick to getting the windows to look more realisticly shiny.  Something that's sprayed on the clear plastic.

I know that model glue will cause the clear plastic to turn white, so I use clear silicone.

  • Member since
    June, 2017
  • From: Winter Park, FL
Posted by fotofrank on Monday, October 30, 2017 8:44 PM

Jay, are you going to build the airplane as Island Airways? A woman I worked with back in the '80s, grew up on an island in Lake Erie. That Ford was her school bus! When the airplane was taken out of regular service, the owner brought it here to Florida. I had the opportunity to fly on the airplane a few times. I think the airplane also appeared in the movie "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom." I've been thinking about building the same kit as Byrd's Antarctic Ford.

Anyway, maybe try liquid cement like Testors or Tamiya to glue the wings together. Then a thin sanding needle to smooth the seam on the leading edge, between the corrugations. As for your clear parts, clean them with alcohol, let the alcohol dry then dip the clear parts in clear Pledge. The clear parts will be very shiny and clear. To attach the clear parts to the inside of the fuselage, use white glue or Formula 500 canopy glue. Make sure the white glue is cured before you glue the fuselage halves together. Before you paint, you can mask the windows with tape like Tamiya's masking tape.

I hope this helps you some...

  • Member since
    February, 2012
Posted by Liegghio on Monday, October 30, 2017 11:42 PM

Your suggestions should do the trick. My sister in law gave me this kit and I wish it was the Byrd expedition version. I would like to print my own decals and convert it to the ill-fated Miskatonic University  1930 Antarctic Expedition plane. There are lots of images on-line of the University's logo and expedition badges.

Indifferent

  • Member since
    April, 2008
  • From: clinton twp,mi
Posted by humper491 on Tuesday, October 31, 2017 4:35 AM
contact tanker builder in a message. he'll walk you through. he's a personal friend, when i talk to him later i'll mention this to him. he answers everyone. another that might be of help is fermis, also a friend, awesome a/c builder . ask questions, you'll get answers! to quote TB "model on"

Humper Beam

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, October 31, 2017 8:22 AM

Also, try posting the questions in the Aircraft and the Airliners and Civil Aircraft forums.  That indeed is a tricky kit, and you may get more help in those forums.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by PFJN on Tuesday, October 31, 2017 1:25 PM

Liegghio

... I would like to print my own decals and convert it to the ill-fated Miskatonic University  1930 Antarctic Expedition plane. There ...

Indifferent

 

 
Hi,
 
As a Lovecraft fan, I can't wait to see your build.  Happy Halloween. Surprise
 
Pat
  • Member since
    October, 2017
Posted by Jay Bones on Friday, November 03, 2017 1:45 AM

fotofrank

Jay, are you going to build the airplane as Island Airways? A woman I worked with back in the '80s, grew up on an island in Lake Erie. That Ford was her school bus! When the airplane was taken out of regular service, the owner brought it here to Florida. I had the opportunity to fly on the airplane a few times. I think the airplane also appeared in the movie "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom." I've been thinking about building the same kit as Byrd's Antarctic Ford.

Anyway, maybe try liquid cement like Testors or Tamiya to glue the wings together. Then a thin sanding needle to smooth the seam on the leading edge, between the corrugations. As for your clear parts, clean them with alcohol, let the alcohol dry then dip the clear parts in clear Pledge. The clear parts will be very shiny and clear. To attach the clear parts to the inside of the fuselage, use white glue or Formula 500 canopy glue. Make sure the white glue is cured before you glue the fuselage halves together. Before you paint, you can mask the windows with tape like Tamiya's masking tape.

I hope this helps you some...

 

 

Thanks man!

If the woman you knew grew up on Kelleys Island, chances are I knew her.  And this plane was in service until around 1980.  Then the people who owned is (Island Airways) realized it was too collectable to continue its daily service and sold it to a collector.

He moved it to Florida, and I heard he had it stored in a hangar that hurricane Andrew flattened.

The museum here is rebuilding one, with plans to paint it in Island Airways livery.

As far as window glue, I use a clear hard drying product called Shoe Goo.  The cockpit windows need to go in after the fusilage halves are mated, but the ones down the sides go in before.  I'm even going to put a little charcoal construction paper down the center so you can't see the insides when displaying or looking closely.

At one point in the early decades of it's service here, they had curtains on the windows and wicker chairs.  When I flew on it the seats were metal frame with a more durable surface.

Great tip on the sanding needle!  Never would have thought of that...

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Friday, November 03, 2017 8:35 AM

On the model the control bell cranks are molded as part of the surface detail.  They are superimposed on the underlying corrugated surface.

 

 

As shown on tha attached photo, the cranks actually stand proud of the surface.   While fabricating replacement cranks is a relatively simple matter, removing the molded-on cranks without damaging the underlying the corrugated surface is more problematic

  • Member since
    September, 2015
  • From: The Redwood Empire
Posted by Aaronw on Saturday, November 04, 2017 11:39 AM

For the windows, I dip them in Future floor polish. It protects them from glue fumes and covers minor blemishes. It can also be use to glue them in place. White glue also works well for glueing clear parts.

 

As far as the seam, look at photos of the real thing. There is a prominent seam along the leading edge of the wing so getting the wing to go together well is not really as tricky as it first seams. 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, November 04, 2017 11:44 AM

EdGrune

On the model the control bell cranks are molded as part of the surface detail.  They are superimposed on the underlying corrugated surface.

 

 

As shown on tha attached photo, the cranks actually stand proud of the surface.   While fabricating replacement cranks is a relatively simple matter, removing the molded-on cranks without damaging the underlying the corrugated surface is more problematic

 

A reasonable strategy there might be to put tape around the cast on detail and sand it down as much as possible, then make another one and glue it on top.

  • Member since
    June, 2017
  • From: Winter Park, FL
Posted by fotofrank on Saturday, November 04, 2017 3:39 PM

Yeah, Jay Jay, putting the windows in from the inside is a pain in the butt, for sure. On the bench right now is an Italeri B-17C/D. I'm having to glue in all of the little clear windows before the fuselage halves go together. I'm using Testors liquid cement applied with a very fine brush to glue them in. I want to make sure they stay in when I mask them for painting. Two of the little windows over the nose area can only go in after the fuselage halves are glued together since they are on the seam. Ugh. I'll probably paint the windows black on the inside since seeing through them isn't necessary anyway. At least the waist windows, canopy, and nose go on after the fuselage is complete.

  • Member since
    August, 2013
Posted by Jay Jay on Sunday, November 05, 2017 10:24 AM

If the window openings are'nt too large you can make your own with Testor's window maker or Bondic laser glue. Simply fill the window void with glue and let it dry. Testor's takes a while to dry but the Bondic stuff is instant.

 

 

 

 

 

 I'm finally retired. Now time I got, money I don't.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, November 05, 2017 10:45 AM

fotofrank

Yeah, Jay Jay, putting the windows in from the inside is a pain in the butt, for sure. On the bench right now is an Italeri B-17C/D. I'm having to glue in all of the little clear windows before the fuselage halves go together. I'm using Testors liquid cement applied with a very fine brush to glue them in. I want to make sure they stay in when I mask them for painting. Two of the little windows over the nose area can only go in after the fuselage halves are glued together since they are on the seam. Ugh. I'll probably paint the windows black on the inside since seeing through them isn't necessary anyway. At least the waist windows, canopy, and nose go on after the fuselage is complete.

 

I find the white glue type window cement, like the Testors or Micro Scale, is just not strong enough to mask over without risking them coming out after fuselage is glued together.  I find the UV hardening (laser) stuff is the answer- much easier and even stronger than epoxy.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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