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Taking modeling supplies to a temp. assignment

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  • Member since
    December, 2002
Taking modeling supplies to a temp. assignment
Posted by 7474 on Thursday, March 22, 2018 2:52 PM

Wanted to ask a quick question, my airline might be sending me to Europe for a 3 - 5 month TDY over the summer to fly. I will have an apartment, and want to do some modeling while I’m over there since it will be day trips and I’ll be back in the apartment every night, other than when I have a good stretch of days off I’ll go and be a tourist. 

What sorts of tools/supplies should I bring with me and how do I take them? I’m thinking things like glue, paints and other solvents should be bought over there.  Thoughts? 

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Thursday, March 22, 2018 3:04 PM

I would take a cutting mat, knife, blades, sanding materials, tape in a couple of sizes, rubber bands, sprue cutters, brushes, etc.  Paint, glues and solvents might be a no-no, have to check with your airline to be sure. If not allowed would have to sourced locally.

As far as what to pack in, suggest an appropiate size fishing tackle box.  The one I take to club meetings is about 12x6x4, one removable tray, and compartments in the top lid.  Got it in the craft box section at HL.  Won't take up a lot of space in the luggage, and can hold quite a bit.

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Thursday, March 22, 2018 9:16 PM

Good luck in traveling with modelling tools and supplies such as model knives/blades, liquid glues and paint/thinner. Most airlines won’t allow you bring it due to flammable nature of the products. Model knives/blades will probably be confiscated at security.

Do a search on hobby shops in the area wherever you’re going to be for 3-4 months. 

  • Member since
    February, 2017
  • From: Hampshire, England, UK
Posted by Tubosteve on Thursday, March 22, 2018 9:32 PM

7474,

Where in Europe are you going to be based? May help others who may be from that country to say whay is locally available.

I have been on business here in the US for a few weeks and bought a bunch of paint (acrylics), glue, model, cutters, scalpel etc whilst I've been here. Going back to UK end of next week and plan on taking it all back with me in my hold baggage (not carry on). Hopefully won't be an issue. Will let ou know later next week.

It's easy to fly, just jump and miss the floor :)

 

Currently on the bench: Tamiya 1:32 P51-D   (in the post......exciting! Big Smile

Finished: Tamiya 1:32 F4U-1 Corsair 'Birdcage'

  • Member since
    April, 2004
Posted by Jon_a_its on Friday, March 23, 2018 6:50 AM

What you can get on the plane depends on security & your airline, simplify things by not taking glue or paints.

Don't take anything remotely electrical, wires, or batteries!

You should be able to take a modellers' toolkit as hold luggage, but be prepared to show & tell to security. 

Where are you going, as it would simplify recommendations for new paint & glue supplies.

 

East Mids Model Club 28th Annual Show 20th MAY 2018

 http://www.eastmidsmodelclub.co.uk/

Don't feed the CM!

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, March 23, 2018 8:40 AM

One item I feel is very important, yet many modelers do not see as a tool is a good lamp.  Normally room lighting does not make an adequate light source for good modeling.  These days with good bright LED lamps there are some real nice yet small task lights, with positionable arms.  Shop around unless you have a good one at home.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    December, 2013
  • From: Orlando Florida
Posted by route62 on Friday, March 23, 2018 9:50 AM

You could ship your supplies to your new address.  This will skip the security issues at the airport.  Research how to clear customs on your items that you are shipping to yourself so that you do not get charged uneccessary customs fees.

  • Member since
    December, 2002
Posted by 7474 on Friday, March 23, 2018 8:09 PM
Thanks for all the replies, I'm going to the Czech Republic. I would prefer to buy liquids such as paint, and solvents locally, and the other things would either be shipped or go in my checked luggage (along with my climbing/camping gear), as I know taking them into my carry on luggage is a big no no.
  • Member since
    February, 2017
  • From: Hampshire, England, UK
Posted by Tubosteve on Friday, March 23, 2018 8:34 PM

7474,

A quick google search of Czech Repulic hobby shops yielded many hits so you should be good out there, especially if you are gonna be in Prague.

https://www.hobbyshop.cz/shop/en/ looks a pretty good bet :)

 

~$2.19 for tamiya acrylic (45 czk) is pretty damm good

It's easy to fly, just jump and miss the floor :)

 

Currently on the bench: Tamiya 1:32 P51-D   (in the post......exciting! Big Smile

Finished: Tamiya 1:32 F4U-1 Corsair 'Birdcage'

  • Member since
    December, 2002
Posted by 7474 on Saturday, March 24, 2018 11:14 AM
Thanks Tubosteve. Would it be worth it to bring a compressor, or just buy one locally, then when I leave try to sell it?
  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Saturday, March 24, 2018 11:34 AM

Remember, virtually any electrical device bought in the USA may not work in a European country without a transformer. When I traveled for the army, I had a small toolbox from Walmart with some basic tools and a set of Testors acrylic paints. I also built 1/72 scale armor and had a few kits inside.

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Saturday, March 24, 2018 11:51 AM

Rob Gronovius

Remember, virtually any electrical device bought in the USA may not work in a European country without a transformer. 

 

This is very true. European electrical outlets are different from ours unless you're able to find an adapter.

  • Member since
    April, 2004
Posted by Jon_a_its on Saturday, March 24, 2018 12:26 PM

US is 110V,  Most of Europe is 240V 50Hz, with many many different plugs,

A 240V-110V inverter would be 12-25lbs 5-10KG deadweight & many times the cost of a cheapo compressor, (at least those used on building sites to run power tools)

I have seen a battery powered compressor capable of running an Iwata, possibly with 7.2v R/C gear batteries, with mains chargers capable of running on 110V or 240V... Truly portable.

East Mids Model Club 28th Annual Show 20th MAY 2018

 http://www.eastmidsmodelclub.co.uk/

Don't feed the CM!

 

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Saturday, March 24, 2018 5:37 PM

Jon_a_its

US is 110V,  Most of Europe is 240V 50Hz, with many many different plugs,

A 240V-110V inverter would be 12-25lbs 5-10KG deadweight & many times the cost of a cheapo compressor, (at least those used on building sites to run power tools)

I have seen a battery powered compressor capable of running an Iwata, possibly with 7.2v R/C gear batteries, with mains chargers capable of running on 110V or 240V... Truly portable.

 

During my time in Germany (Dec 87-Dec 90), I had a small transformer that was the size of an electric desktop pencil sharpener. It was fairly heavy, but inexpensive. Not made for major appliances, but for something small like my stereo.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Monday, April 02, 2018 9:45 AM

I would check with PAVEL .

  He lives in Poland so he might advise you as to what might be permitted in the Czech Republic . Maybe not , But I would try .

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