SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Finish Work on Models

736 views
17 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    April, 2018
Finish Work on Models
Posted by LongIslandModeler on Sunday, April 29, 2018 9:30 AM

Hello everyone, I am new to this forum and relatively new to the modeling hobby. I am already addicted and I am having a blast doing it. I am trying to get better and better by constantly using trial and error and watching, I am sure many of the members here, videos on youtube and other websites. I know it is a simple question but one I am curious to learn. After spending time airbrushing and clearing model bodies, I then get to the finish work. Gluing trim, mirrors, bumbers, etc and I always seem to have glue run or my hand isn't steady enough to hold in a specific location. I constantly find myself messing up my paint job with glue either removing paint or leaving a mark at the least. Do you use the same glue you use for gluing together sub assemblies or clear parts cement or is there a little trick you guys can all pass along to a new modeler? Thank you for your time!

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: hamburg michigan
Posted by fermis on Monday, April 30, 2018 8:58 PM

Sounds like you do cars, mostly???

Regardless...once you have a finish coat on, your standard model cement will have to "eat" through you paint to be able to "weld" plastic to plastic...not to mention the problems you already mentioned. I pretty much stick to aircraft, but plastic is plastic. When it comes time to add the final fiddly bits, I use CA (super glue). Hold the small part with some tweezers, then transfer the CA with a toothpick or something similar to said part. (I put a drop of CA on a piece of scrap plastic...NEVER directly from bottle to part). Then place the part and hold it there for a few seconds. Go lightly with the CA...if you get it too heavy, it'll fog up the area (clear gloss usually makes the "fog" go away though).

  • Member since
    April, 2018
Posted by LongIslandModeler on Monday, April 30, 2018 9:33 PM

Thank you! Yes, I do cars mostly and I appreciate the advice. I find that to be the most difficult part of the model and trying to keep it nice. Even when putting together the chassis and adding suspension or other parts that have to go on painted pins or slots that have paint I find it to be very difficult to prevent paint from running or smudging. Maybe my hand is not still enough but I constantly am touching up and it never looks as uniform.

  • Member since
    August, 2012
  • From: Parker City, IN.
Posted by Rambo on Monday, April 30, 2018 9:42 PM
Like Fermis said if gluing to a already painted part CA it's the way to go. Also try scraping just a tiny amount of paint off the surface you wish to glue to it will help it adhere better

Clint

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Monday, April 30, 2018 10:10 PM

It's tough - requires steady hand and confidence which means you have to mess up a few ;) to get to where you want to be.

I also will use testors clear parts glue to attach delicate parts as well.  No crazing and you can clean up and oozes/drips with a damp q-tip.  No where near as strong as CA, but more forgiving for sure.  

When I do use CA for these types of things I use the thick slower drying type so you have a few seconds to position.

With this Lotus Coventry climax, you have clear glass on paint, then mirrors on glass!  This is where the testors stuff is a must (or a plain elmers will do).

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 6:41 AM

Or you're rushing to get the model done. I don't paint the parts before assembly. For example. I'll assemble the basics - engine block halves, manifold, oil pan, headers, etc... before painting. Fanbelt I will paint before assembly as well. It's all about figuring out what to paint first or after assembly when doing car kits.

Interiors are usually painted first before assembly obviously.

Or the glue has yet gotten a chance to dry before going to the next step.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 7:18 AM

Aww;

 Where can I get one of those ? That's the kind of little green race car I like !

  • Member since
    September, 2011
  • From: Milaca, Minnesota
Posted by falconmod on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 7:46 AM

keavdog

It's tough - requires steady hand and confidence which means you have to mess up a few ;) to get to where you want to be.

I also will use testors clear parts glue to attach delicate parts as well.  No crazing and you can clean up and oozes/drips with a damp q-tip.  No where near as strong as CA, but more forgiving for sure.  

When I do use CA for these types of things I use the thick slower drying type so you have a few seconds to position.

With this Lotus Coventry climax, you have clear glass on paint, then mirrors on glass!  This is where the testors stuff is a must (or a plain elmers will do).

 

Yes, who's kit is this? Big Smile  I don't do very many cars, but I'd do that one.

John

On the Bench: 1/72 Ki-67, 1/48 Airfix P-51D

1/72 LS Dinah III, 1/72 Hasegawa T-33A

  • Member since
    April, 2018
Posted by LongIslandModeler on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 8:08 AM

Sometimes it’s unavoidable. I put together as much of the car before I paint as possible. I’m referring to when your paint is on and dry and finished. I am not rushing, sometimes it’s unavoidable having to glue on a piece of trim or mirrors.

  • Member since
    April, 2018
Posted by LongIslandModeler on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 8:09 AM

Thank you for your advice. This kit is amazing!

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 8:11 AM

I don't build car kits, but the same issue arises with aircraft and armour. Whether it be bombs or tools, i paint them before fitting to the kit. As others have mentioned, CA does the trick here.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

 

On the bench: Airfix 1/72nd Phantom FG.1

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: From the Mit, but live in Mason, O high ho
Posted by hogfanfs on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 8:15 AM

You can also try Gator Glue. It's an acrylic glue that is a lot like Elmer's white glue, but will bond much stronger than white glue. I use it when I know I will not be very accurate placing a part on the model. It can be cleaned with water and a q-tip. But, it does not have as strong a bond as CA glue. Hope this helps.

 Bruce

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 12:37 PM

That is the Tamiya 1/20 Lotus 25 Coventry Climax. If you like that, check out their Honda RA272 as well.

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    April, 2018
Posted by LongIslandModeler on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 12:43 PM

What is all of your go to CA brand? I ordered insta cure, the purple bottle but wasn’t sure if I should get a different one. 

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 12:47 PM

Thats what I use.  I keep a bottle of instaset or zipkicker on the  bench as well.  It instantly cures the CA when sprayed.  Useful from time to time.

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    April, 2018
Posted by LongIslandModeler on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 12:53 PM

Many thanks. I really appreciate all of your help on this topic! Now to the bench!

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Tuesday, May 01, 2018 1:58 PM

LongIslandModeler

What is all of your go to CA brand? I ordered insta cure, the purple bottle but wasn’t sure if I should get a different one. 

 

I use Zap-A-Gap Medium, the green one.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

 

On the bench: Airfix 1/72nd Phantom FG.1

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Wednesday, May 09, 2018 6:26 AM

Hmmm; 

When I get to a certain stage on a car .I won't do any more for sometimes a month . Why ? Well , after painting ( One Week with gas - out time ) , and foiling , I let it rest . This gives me time to get the engine detailed ( if I am going to do that ) and the chassis .Especially the stance .

 When I go Back to the body I use Cotton Gloves like they do in museums to handle artifacts .  This prevents body and skin oils from getting on my finish . I always use disposable gloves while modeling anyway . I have to use the small .

  I find that this holds true for most of what I do . One step at a time , just the way I did 65 years ago . Although I do use Zap I refrain from it mostly , except for rail-road scenery items like buildings ! I don't believe I've used it much on autos , planes or armor .I glue with Tamiyas trusty green Label , and let the parts cure before moving ahead .

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.