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Academy's styrene Vs. 3M's spot putty

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  • Member since
    June, 2007
  • From: Oakbank, MB
Academy's styrene Vs. 3M's spot putty
Posted by GregFK on Monday, April 01, 2019 12:13 PM

Hello all,

Wondering if any of you have ever had any issues with using 3M's spot putty with Academy kits. The reason I ask is that I attempted to use some on Academy's Graf Spee and it didn't react too well. It seems as if it's a tad too "hot" for the Academy mix of styrene. It softened the kit pieces quite substantially and took forever to cure. I have used this putty for years on just about every kit known to man and have never had similar issues. Have any of you? Can any of you recommend an alternative putty that may not react in the sme way?

Thanks in advance.

Cheer,

Greg

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, April 02, 2019 9:24 AM

I forget which brand I am using now, but I have used auto spot putty for several decades, including building several Academy kits.  I have never had a problem.  It is important to recognize that spot putty is indeed pretty hot, and to be sparing in its use.  The same thing is true with two-part fillers, which generate heat during their curing, though with spot putty the term hot does not mean a thermal reaction, but is a buzz word for chemical process.  With both types it is sort of like painting- better to do filling in several thin coats than one thick one.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

fox
  • Member since
    January, 2007
  • From: Narvon, Pa.
Posted by fox on Tuesday, April 02, 2019 12:32 PM

Ditto on the spot putty. I used the "Bondo" blue for a long time but can't get it in this area anymore. Switched to the red. Used out of the tube, it's great on general filling. For the real small jobs, I have a small paint jar with the red thinned with lacquer thinner. Dries fast and sands easily.

Jim  Captain

 Main WIP: 

   On the Bench:  Revell 1/96 USS Kearsarge - 70% 

I keep hitting "escape", but I'm still here.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, April 02, 2019 2:28 PM

I can't answer you directly because I don't know any case where it was a problem. I've used Bondo Spot for about ten years now with no problems other than occasional craking of the putty if I apply it a little thickly.

One thing I do is mask my areas to be puttied to be close to the problem, and not apply it generally all over. I also don't use putty for chanbging shapes, mostly just for seam work.

  • Member since
    June, 2007
  • From: Oakbank, MB
Posted by GregFK on Saturday, April 06, 2019 11:06 AM

Hi Gents,

Thanks for your thoughts on the subject. I think I may have solved my own problem. It seems as if the spot putty definitely reacted with Academy's styrene in a different manner than I'm used to. It appears as if Academy's styrene is a little softer than I'm used to. It was really "hot" and softened the plastic. I wasn't waiting long enough between application and sanding. The styrene was still soft and reacting with the putty. I tried it on a scrap piece and let it sit overnight with no ill effects. Lesson learned.

Thanks for all your input. It's much appreciated.

Cheers,

Greg

  • Member since
    March, 2005
Posted by philo426 on Saturday, April 06, 2019 5:04 PM

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Sunday, April 07, 2019 11:16 AM

Greg;

       I have found that the use of " Spot " putty is directly opposite to what is intended . In the auto Body world it is Not used till the surface has been primed and then sanded Showing the low spots .( Rock and stone divots and door bumps ). I would insist that unless there was no other way then use it sparingly ! T.B.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, April 08, 2019 8:46 AM

Tanker - Builder

Greg;

       I have found that the use of " Spot " putty is directly opposite to what is intended . In the auto Body world it is Not used till the surface has been primed and then sanded Showing the low spots .( Rock and stone divots and door bumps ). I would insist that unless there was no other way then use it sparingly ! T.B.

 

Note that many brands now call it glazing putty vs spot putty.  Also, I generally prime before filling a seam, and only use the putty when the seam has low spots. I file off high spots.  So I am in effect doing the same thing with it as when I use it on a car body.  

I do agree with the idea that it must be used sparingly.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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