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I need help! I dont know what i did wrong

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  • Member since
    November, 2018
Posted by Noah on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 12:43 PM

You should try using a acrylic clear coat because I think the turpentine might be eating away at the lacquer.  I've actually ran test were I very slightly thinned down the testors laquer clear coat with oil based thinners, like turpentine.  Now it was very slightly, but if it's already a thin layer of clear coat than the thinner is going to thin it quit a lot. But, all I'm trying to say is I never har a problem with acrylic clear coats and oil washes.  Hope that this helps. -Noah

 

P.S. try just using just regular oil thinner, it's way more safe and does about the same. :)

Noah

  • Member since
    July, 2018
  • From: The Deep Woods
Posted by Tickmagnet on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 7:14 AM

Haven't seen it mentioned but you can do a pastel sludge wash or, if you want to do just panel line pin washes use thinned down water color paint with a drop of dish soap without hurting your clear coat. I know these are not the go to tools these days but I prefer them because they work well with water clean up and no harmful chemicals, nasty odors, or possible damage to the paint job. You do still want to do those on a good gloss coat not directly on the paint. I've read these washes work well or even better on a flat or matte clear coat  but have yet to try it. Good luck with whatever you try that works for you. 

 

 

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Tuesday, April 09, 2019 5:39 PM

You cannot use a solvent type wash over a solvent finish. You need a barrier coat as in a clear acrylic so the solvent wash will not affect it. Caution here cuz the acrylic needs some curing time. I’m exrTra  cautious and wait several days to let things cure. No need to rush and ruin your work. Just my .02. 

I recommend Flory Washes. They are water/clay based and safe over anything.

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Tuesday, April 09, 2019 2:57 PM

I'd buy some cheap craft store acrylics for washes, if I were you.  By cheap, I mean their price, not their quality.  I use them for washes, but also now for other painting jobs.  You can thin them with water.  And when they're on sale, you can get them for less than a dollar a bottle, for a bottle that will last a very long time.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Tuesday, April 09, 2019 2:55 PM

lowfly
Can i assume i can make a wash with Tamiya Black XF-1 and thin it WAY down with the X-20A then clean it up with paper towels or Q tips in the X-20A? Will this attack the Acrylic Gloss coat?

Maybe. Probably. Depends on cure time on the acrylic clear.

Hint: think dissimilar layers. If your clear gloss over decals is acrylic, use oil wash (or solvent-based wash) of your choice. If your clear gloss over decals is solvent-based (like Alclad II clear coats (NOT Aqua Clear) or Testors spray clear, etc, use water-based wash (like Flory wash, Vallejo wash, or home-made acrylic wash).

That said, if you wait long enough for cure time, you can almost put anything over anything, but true cure time can be weeks or more.

-Greg

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: From the Mit, but live in Mason, O high ho
Posted by hogfanfs on Tuesday, April 09, 2019 1:14 PM

You have to be careful with alcohol too. It can get aggressive too. And I believe the X-20A has some alcohol content in it. If you are going to make a wash with the XF-1 and X-20A, I would use the Testors gloss lacquer for a clear protection coat and not an acrylic. 

My best suggestion is if you have a old spare model that you can use for testing. Do a test on the spare model before attempting on your B-25. 

Also, give the clear coat time to cure. Say 24 hours before attempting to weather.

Hope this helps.

 Bruce

 

 On the bench:  1/48 Eduard MiG-21MF

                        1/35 Takom Merkava Mk.I

 

  • Member since
    February, 2016
Posted by lowfly on Tuesday, April 09, 2019 12:21 PM

wow...thanks for the great advice. I will switch to an acrylic based wash and acrylic thinners.  I normally use Tamiyas X-20A for the bulk of my thinning for AB. 

 

Can i assume i can make a wash with Tamiya Black XF-1 and thin it WAY down with the X-20A then clean it up with paper towels or Q tips in the X-20A?

Will this attack the Acrylic Gloss coat?

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: From the Mit, but live in Mason, O high ho
Posted by hogfanfs on Tuesday, April 09, 2019 11:45 AM

It the thinner that you used. It was too hot.

Ideally, if you used acrylics to seal the paint, use an oil based wash and thinner for weathering. This can even get a bit touchy at times too. If you use too hot of a thinner, it can eat through some acrylics. Lacquer thinners are the hottest, meaning they are the most chemically aggressive to finishes.

If you use a enamel/lacquer to seal the base coat, use an acrylic wash and thinner for weathering.

 Bruce

 

 On the bench:  1/48 Eduard MiG-21MF

                        1/35 Takom Merkava Mk.I

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, April 09, 2019 11:37 AM

Or try using acrylic clear to seal the decals. Besides Future, which gets a lot of smack, there are other good ones like Tamiya.

I use Turpenoid for my washes, which is mineral spirits, not pine tree sap and is pretty odorless.

Real turpentine is pretty agressive. I use it to clean up dry epoxy.

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Tuesday, April 09, 2019 11:27 AM

Most likely your washes are oil based and you using thinner that will attack it and cause it to melt your paint job.

I usually use Testors Black Detail wash. Clean up using water, not thinner. Maybe try using acrylic based wash. They can be cleaned up with water. Maybe someone will chime in for better advice.

  • Member since
    February, 2016
I need help! I dont know what i did wrong
Posted by lowfly on Monday, April 08, 2019 9:57 AM

Hello fellow modelers,

 

I am fairly new and have watched a LOT of videos on line about different techniques.  I am building the Revell 1/48th scale B-25 and i have just finished the base coating stage. I use Vallejo Model Air Acrylics to do the base colors and did 1 coat of Testors Gloss Lacquer, Applied my decals and than did a 2nd coat of Testors Gloss Lacquer. 

 

Everything looked good until i decided to do an Oil Sludge wash using windsor and newtons oil paints and W&N Turpintine to clean it off.  The sludge coat went on really well but when i went to clean it off it literally melted my paint job and my decals! i then decided to do a pin wash with Tamiya's panel line accent and enamel thinner to clean it up.  Same situation.  What did i do wrong? I can fix the paint job but i want to try the weathering techniques i have seen.  Any advice or help is most apprciated

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