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With a new model comes a new strategy...

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  • Member since
    May 2020
  • From: South Africa
With a new model comes a new strategy...
Posted by ohms on Thursday, September 10, 2020 1:42 PM

I had to do it, man! Don't come after me, guys, but I just HAD TO get rid of the two models I was working with. They were just sitting there, and since I started them somewhere around March Indifferent I realized I'm just fooling myself to think I'm ever going to get back to them in any serious way.

The crazy thing is I WANT TO pass time doing models at night, but I just couldn't bring myself to the same old, same old two kits. Too many mistakes had built up, and it got to a point where I decided they had to go. 

I'm now starting a brand-new kit, the Aoshima Back to the Future Delorean, and I'm happy to say my enthusiasm is back again! I've pinpointed in my mind what I love the least about scale modelling: the airbrusing/painting process, so I'm going to completely change my approach.

I'm going to try to paint all pieces of the same colour in one go, or in the fewest amount of passes possible. Have all the pieces cut and ready, sorted into their main colours, and get all the paiting done within hopefully a week. 

Whats making me happy about this is I'm feeling pumped again! I think sometimes you do need to force a clean slate and get rid of unwanted baggage that's holding you back (a bit like life Big Smile). 'Course I know throwing away half-finished kits is frowned upon, and I do think if you do it often it can be seen as a bad habit, but I think from now I'm going to have a cut-off time. If I don't make much progress within 3 weeks, into the bin it goes.

Yes, modeling can be expensive, but I don't buy intricate kits, and life is short, so....provided I don't overdo it, I think it was the right decision.

Into model building since September 2019. Also into books (mostly science-fiction), comic books, and gaming.

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Thursday, September 10, 2020 2:11 PM
I've trashed some during my career,you should at least save them to test out new techniques or for whatever spares might come in handy

  • Member since
    March 2007
  • From: Northeast WA State
Posted by armornut on Thursday, September 10, 2020 2:49 PM

    Hi Ohms, part of modelling is the relaxation it brings, the learning through research, yes even frustrations brought on by not knowing how to do something. I won't frown on you for trashing a kit or two...I have done it myself in the past. That being said I suggest not putting a time limit on the life of your kits. All of us have lost interest in our projects from time to time however something sparks the interest again and it is off to the races.

      Be proud of your finished kits, remember YOU are your own worst critic. Us them as visual teaching tools to remind you of what not to do on your next build.

    I figure you probably already do this but it is worth mentioning, study the instructions front to back, find ways to simplify your process ie sub assemblies, paint first, paint can wait, etc. And as always never be afraid to reach out for help.

we're modelers it's what we do

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Far Northern CA
Posted by mrmike on Thursday, September 10, 2020 3:04 PM

Nobody, least of all me, can fault you for setting aside a frustrating build or two in favor of a fresh box of plastic. New kits always hold the promise of a more interesting and satisfying experience, and the opportunity to apply lessons learned.

That said, I urge you to put those first two kits in a box or on a shelf. As Tojo said, they can always be a source of spare parts or test mules for a new technique or paint. Here's another, personal reason. I'm getting back to the bench after almost two years of life events, and I'm enjoying one new kit and one that I shelved years ago when I was just getting "serious" about the hobby.

The new kit is fun, requiring a bit of scratch building and modification to get the model I want. The old kit is a benchmark for me; an old Hasegawa 1/32 aircraft that tested my skills to the point where I almost pitched it. I decided to finish it now with a "just build it" attitude and I'm really enjoying it; the things that were so frustrating are no longer an issue, and I'm going to wind up with a model instead of a box of parts.

My two cents. Enjoy that DeLorean and Happy Modelling!

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, September 10, 2020 3:17 PM

I learn a lot from my older builds. I'll immediately see that work I thought was great, wasn't. I wait until I finish a kit before I throw it away. I probably save about 25% of them.

 

Bill

Modeling is an excuse to buy books

 

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Thursday, September 10, 2020 3:38 PM

A couple of years ago I bought an old Tommy Ivo four engine Showboat dragster. The assembly of the exhaust headers turned out to be nothing but frustration. Life is too short for that. I put the model back into its box and put it back on its shelf. Onto better and more enjoyable things.

  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Thursday, September 10, 2020 6:12 PM

Cobber, you aren't the first bloke, (or blokess), to chuck a kit and I'm pretty sure you won't be the last. I agree with the others though. Its better if you put them aside to either come back to later, or to use as a practice piece. I have models that I left half finished several years ago, now that I've come back to modeling again and joined the forums, I can feel the creative juices flowing. The desire to get those beasties out and finish them, good or bad, is on me. And if they're not that good, the grandkids will love them anyway.

True Blue

  • Member since
    January 2020
  • From: Maryland
Posted by wpwar11 on Thursday, September 10, 2020 6:59 PM

Interesting that the paint process is your least favorite part of scale modeling.  I think most modelers find that their favorite part.  I’m a newbie so I need all the practice I can get.  Throwing away a project would never occur to me.  At the end of the day it’s your model and you can do as you wish with it.  However, you posted here so maybe your looking for some magic words of wisdom.  You mentioned a new game plan and that may be something that works for you.  I’d worry that opening a new kit and scraping the current one would become habit.  Don’t let that happen.  Regardless of your favorite part of the build we all love the finish line.  Stay the course.

 

fox
  • Member since
    January 2007
  • From: Narvon, Pa.
Posted by fox on Thursday, September 10, 2020 7:55 PM

I have used Covid as an excuse to clean up my Shelf of Doom. Have it almost empty now. Two planes left and I'll have a clear shelf for future builds. At the rate I'm going I'll have them finished in about 2 weeks. I always keep them for painting tests or spare parts if I can't complete them for one reason or another.

Jim Captain

Stay Safe.

 Main WIP: 

   On the Bench:  Revell 1/96 USS Kearsarge - 70% 

I keep hitting "escape", but I'm still here.

  • Member since
    May 2020
  • From: South Africa
Posted by ohms on Monday, September 14, 2020 1:39 AM

Thanks everyone for the replies.

I was reading 'Atomic Habits' by James Clear, and one of the things pointed out in the book was this group test that was once carried out.

Two groups were asked to produce the best picture they could take of the city. The first group was told they could only present one picture for consideration, while the other group was told they could take as many pictures as they wanted. 

The result was the second group won out. The point is you need lots of quantity to get to quality.

Another point brought up in the book: people try to be consistent in their habits becuase they're waiting for the end goal, i.e. you go to the gym for a few days because you want that six-pack. Only many people will stop going after a few days becuase they don't have that six-pack yet. It's the six-pack that makes them happy, not the habit.

The author points out that what you really should be happy with is the fact that you went to the gym. If you want to maintain your good habits, don't look too much at the horizon. Do something every day, even if it's a little, and the horizon will come eventually.

Like Jimmy Cliff, I can see clearly now: since I started my new model, I'm back in the swing of things. I don't have to force time for model work at night. I'm back in that timeless, spaceless 'zone' when I'm working on it. I even did some work when I came home for lunch! 

Sure, I could've saved the older models for practice in future, or maybe if/when the spark came back in me to resume building them. But starting a NEW MODEL was what I needed, because I'm enjoying doing the same processes for a new model that I could've done for the older models. It's just that the processes for the older models weren't as interesting to me (even though it was the same type of work). 

So that's my little victory for the month. Now I'm just crafting for the sake of crafting: forget the end result. If I produce good stuff, yay! I can save it on my shelf. If I don't, at least I enjoyed the journey. And with a lot of work, I can only improve anyway.

Thanks for the time. :) And thanks again for the advice.

Into model building since September 2019. Also into books (mostly science-fiction), comic books, and gaming.

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Monday, September 14, 2020 6:27 AM
I can see starting something new and interesting to get you going again,especially since it worked and your having fun with the hobby, but why throw out the old unfinished kits.

  • Member since
    May 2020
  • From: South Africa
Posted by ohms on Monday, September 14, 2020 7:47 AM

Tojo72
I can see starting something new and interesting to get you going again,especially since it worked and your having fun with the hobby, but why throw out the old unfinished kits.

 
Hi Tojo,
 
I think in future it will depend on the kit. I don't think I'll keep anything I'm sure I'm not going to return to because a) I feel it's beyond salvaging and b) I don't need any more spare plastic for practice.

Into model building since September 2019. Also into books (mostly science-fiction), comic books, and gaming.

  • Member since
    July 2019
  • From: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posted by Bobstamp on Monday, September 14, 2020 12:06 PM

ohms

Two groups were asked to produce the best picture they could take of the city. The first group was told they could only present one picture for consideration, while the other group was told they could take as many pictures as they wanted.

There is the example of the infinite number of monkeys supplied with an infinite number of typewriters (and presumably infinite supply of typewriter paper and ribbons and a good typewriter repairman — remember typewriter repairmen?): Eventually, one of the monkeys will reproduce Hamlet or some other Shakespearean play.

I once took several photos of a Canadian veteran at a Remembrance Day ceremony. One of the frames showed him as a deadly serious, presumably combat-worn vet mourning the loss of his comrades. But four or five other frames pictured him with just a blank stare (not a troubled,thousand-yard stare), or with a smile, or even laughing with the man next to him. If I had taken just one photo, I might have missed what I considered the one most representative of the somber moments of the ceremony.

However, I once read a book by a well-known, large-format landscape photographer who hosted phototography retreats in New England. Among his methods: He would supply each participant with one sheet of film for their camera and send them out into the surrounding countryside. They weren't to return until they were confident that they had captured the best possible image of whatever subject they chose. 

I actually tried a version of that shooting plan for myself (which is not a hard choice, considering the cost of large-format film), and was pleased with the result. Here's the result:

Bob

On the bench: Italeri 1/72 UH-34 Seahorse helicopter; Academy 1/72 F-86F Sabre; Revell S.S. Hope, being built as the hospital ship U.S.S. Repose, and a diorama to illustrate the crash of a Beech T-34B Mentor which I survived in 1962.

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