SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Fighting motivation issues

2146 views
22 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Savannah, GA USA
Fighting motivation issues
Posted by Bones-coa on Monday, October 6, 2003 9:22 AM
This is something I've always fought. I get halfway into building a model and become extreamly unmotivated to go on. For me, it usually occures arround the time of masking and painting the model.

What kind of model building techniques have you guys come up with to help prevent this?

Thanks.
Dana
Dana F On the bench: Tamiya DO335B-2 with LOTS of Aires stuff (On Hold) Trumpeter A-10 with LOTS and LOTS of aftermarket goodies! (On Hold) Tamiya 240ZG (In work)
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Sandusky Ohio, USA
Posted by Swanny on Monday, October 6, 2003 9:39 AM
I usually have three or four projects going at one time so I can switch off when I get tired of one particular kit. Sometimes one kit will not see any action for a week or two but when all the others have reached a waiting point for something to dry I'll force myself to look at the delayed project and more often than not will become remotivated on it. Occasionally they can really drag out, my 1/48 PB4Y-1 took nine months to complete and the Fw-200 took four or five months. I started an Academy P-38 two months ago as a "quickie" and just managed to get the gear mounted last night. Not real quick.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Savannah, GA USA
Posted by Bones-coa on Monday, October 6, 2003 9:44 AM
Yea, I've started working on two models at once too. However, I'm limiting myself to only two at a time. I actually don't enjoy working on more than one at a time. I also don't like to have my workspace cluttered by compnents and paints for more than one model.

I have to admit though that it does help me stay motivated.
Dana
Dana F On the bench: Tamiya DO335B-2 with LOTS of Aires stuff (On Hold) Trumpeter A-10 with LOTS and LOTS of aftermarket goodies! (On Hold) Tamiya 240ZG (In work)
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: The flat lands of the Southeast
Posted by styrene on Monday, October 6, 2003 10:06 AM
Dana,
I'm kinda like you. I find the same thing happening to me. Come to find out, I enjoy the building process, and pretty much detest painting. If building was all there was, I would have built far more than I have currently. I think the idea of keeping more than one project going provides some motivation to keep going, and prevents a certain amount of staleness and boredom from setting in. But I have to admit, for as much as I don't really like painting and all its associated processes that much, I really enjoy it when it's done...I really enjoy washing and drybrushing, but don't care much for painting and decaling. Weird, huh?!
Gip Winecoff

1882: "God is dead"--F. Nietzsche

1900: "Nietzsche is dead"--God

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Savannah, GA USA
Posted by Bones-coa on Monday, October 6, 2003 10:10 AM
Nope, that's pretty much like me. I love painting and detailing the cockpit and other parts. I guess I don't enjoy airbrushing as it seems to be such a pain to me. I also must do that outside, so that does kind of makes it a pain.
Dana
Dana F On the bench: Tamiya DO335B-2 with LOTS of Aires stuff (On Hold) Trumpeter A-10 with LOTS and LOTS of aftermarket goodies! (On Hold) Tamiya 240ZG (In work)
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: The flat lands of the Southeast
Posted by styrene on Monday, October 6, 2003 10:17 AM
I'm with you, Dana. I think my biggest headache is the initial airbrush setup, and then the cleanup afterwards. If you could just walk in, paint, and walk away, it would be great. No muss, no fuss...I think what Testors, Tamiya, and the other manufacturers need to do is make a "spray can" in the shape of an airbrush with an adjustable spray nozzle. The can would hold enough paint for one or two models, and you would throw it away when empty.
Gip Winecoff

1882: "God is dead"--F. Nietzsche

1900: "Nietzsche is dead"--God

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Broken Arrow, Oklahoma
Posted by maddafinga on Monday, October 6, 2003 1:52 PM
I like the painting, where I bog down is the decaling. It's very frustrating to me, especially when I screw something up and just have to live with it as is. I'm mostly done with my F-18, but haven't worked on it in weeks. The decals are about half way finished. I just have to finish that up, clear coat it, then start weathering. I don't even mind the weathering really, I just can't seem to get motivated to finish it. Maybe it's that once it's finished, I won't have it to work on anymore, who can say. I do have other stuff to work on in the meantime though. I should set a goal to get it finished by Nov though. Hmmm. It would clear out some space on my table also...

madda
Madda Trifles make perfection, but perfection is no trifle. -- Leonardo Da Vinci Tact is for those who lack the wit for sarcasm.--maddafinga
  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: Dahlonega, Georgia
Posted by lizardqing on Monday, October 6, 2003 2:13 PM
Styrene- You just need my luck, I get tired of painting details but my wife enjoys doing it so she does the majority of the painting that I don't really want to so I can work on building other parts.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, October 6, 2003 3:00 PM
I usually build between 4 and 6 kits at a time, just so I don't get bored with one after so long. I finished the cockpit on my A-10, and haven't touched it for probably 3 months. I'll get back to it eventually, but I just have other things I'd rather work on right now. I just seem to get bored with projects if they take longer than a couple of weeks. Glad to hear that I'm not the only one.

demono69
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Harrisburg, PA
Posted by Lufbery on Monday, October 6, 2003 3:19 PM
Hi all,

I only get a handful of hours (2-3) to work on a kit each week, so I don't really get bored. If anything, I long for more time to do the work. Where I get bogged down is when I'm ready to start work and then realize that I'm missing something, a paint color, liquid mask, whatever, and I need to buy it before I can continue.

The advantage to my approach is that I'm almost always eager to do more work and I'm usually happy about finishing a task in one to two hours. The disadvantage is that it takes me months to finish a single model.

Regards,

-Drew

-Drew

Build what you like; like what you build.

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Rain USA, Vancouver WA
Posted by tigerman on Monday, October 6, 2003 4:21 PM
I echo your sentiments about cleaning up an airbrush, but after that base coat goes on, the model begins to look like something. Unfortunately, I get hung up on weathering. Now that I feel obligated to try washes, I'm stuck in neutral practicing something I hope I like. I have four models going, which for me is too much. It makes me feel like I'll never finish one. I need to focus on one and stop buying new kits. Perhaps, I can't buy any until I finish one, might motivate me.

"It is well that war is so terrible, lest we grow too fond of it."-R.E.Lee

   http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y269/wing_nut_5o/PANZERJAGERGB.jpg

 Eric 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Sunny Florida
Posted by renarts on Monday, October 6, 2003 5:35 PM
When I'm having motivational problems (like painting wheels on tanks) I break it into smaller goals. This way there are more accomplishments than uphill battles. I set a goal (a small one if its something I dread) and then accomplish that. This way I can either move on to the next goal or walk away feeling like I accomplished something. It's all positive then. The other thing that helps is to scehdule the task you are being motivationaly challenged on. If yoou hat to do wheels, then set a schedule like before I do anything else, I'm gooing to spend 15 minutes on wheels. Then move on. Or schedule a specific build session (and hold to it) of say 2 hours on a specific night to do nothing but the wheels. It may sound silly but it works, at least for me. Since most of it is psycological anyway, better a short victory than an extended campaign.

Mike
Mike "Imagination is the dye that colors our lives" Marcus Aurellius A good friend will come and bail you out of jail...but, a true friend will be sitting next to you saying, "Damn...that was fun!"
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Washington State
Posted by leemitcheltree on Monday, October 6, 2003 5:48 PM
It might sound weird, but my biggest motivational hurdle is my search for perfection. I agonise about doing something and end up putting it off, and try to imagine all the possible problems that will prevent a perfect result – then I solve all those problems in my head.
Then, when I do attack the assembly, it usually ends up as good as it can get.
I find that working on several models at once helps – or just go out and throw the ball around with the kids for a while to recharge the batteries.
Cheers
LeeTree

Cheers, LeeTree
Remember, Safety Fast!!!

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Canada / Czech Republic
Posted by upnorth on Monday, October 6, 2003 6:13 PM
For me, I've realized that there is a "critical mass" you can hit in almost every aspect of the hobby that will burn you straight out for a while.

One way I found over this, is to set all of your in depth projects with all the extra detailing and competition grade finishing techniques aside and re aquaint yourself with the simple joys of doing a kit or two straight from the box.

Nothing fancy and nothing over and above what the manufacturer gave you, you don't even have to keep the finished model if you don't want to.

Doing a kit straight from the box puts me back in that joyous state of mind that I was in as a 7 or 8 year old just starting out on the hobby.

The detailing thing, I find, is a real burn out and motivation breaker. I've had Revell's 1/32 MiG-21 on the go on and off for 5 years now. Most of the extra detailing and scratchbuilding was required. I had to take a real long break after scratchbuilding new landing gear bays and landing gear legs. Again I needed a break after correcting and scratchbuilding some glaringly inaccurate fuselage surface details. Its still not complete, but I'd have given up on it long ago if I hadn't set it down for a month or two here and there.

Those out of the box kits I did during my breaks have saved the MiG from my scrap pile.

There is also the issue of overloading yourself with unbuilt kits, a few years ago I had about 20 or 30 unbuilt kits that I was staring down and getting to realizing tha tthere was no way I was going to get them all done before I lost intrest in building them. I picked a few to keep (no more than I thought I could complete in a two year time span) and gave the rest to a local thrift shop.

Not only did I get a load off my mind in that act, but I've probably given some enjoyment to a less fortunate kid or two, that when you look at the cost of kits today, wouldn't have a chance at the hobby otherwise.

A few rules I've made for myself to protect from burning out:

1: Know how much time you can reasonably give to the hobby and never stockpile more unbuilts than you can keep interested in (If I know I can't get to it in two years from time of purchase, I don't buy it).

2: Buy picky. Yes, it would be grand to have every kit that caught your eye for a split second in the hobby shop, but its not very realistic. Know what you like, know what you want and make real sure you WANT it. There's nothing worse than buying something then asking "why did I buy THAT?" a few months down the road.

3: Detail, how much do you really need? what can you justify and whats just frivolous waste that no one will see once the fuselage is glued together around it? Don't waste valuable time and materials on details that only you know are there.

4: NEVER underestimate the power of the straight from the box building experience. There is something very gratifying in having a beautiful model on your shelf and being able to say that there's nothing extra on it.

5: Keep it FUN! If it ain't fun, you're doing it wrong! Fun is what got all of us into this hobby and fun is what will keep us all in it. If that means we don't break the bank on aftermarket for every model we build or spend bizarre hours scratchbuilding something smaller than the eraser on the end of a pencil, so be it.

6: Build for YOURSELF first, forget competition judges, forget what anyone else thinks. Does the model satisfy YOU? If yes, then motivation will only be a minor issue for you, if no, adjust your attitude to the hobby. If you aren't doing it for yourself before anyone else, you're doing it for the wrong reasons.
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: The flat lands of the Southeast
Posted by styrene on Monday, October 6, 2003 6:15 PM
Lee,
I see the old perfection bug has bitten you, too. If I can't build it perfectly the first time, I experience the "creation-perfection-if-this-doesn't-improve-then -the-kit's-in-the-trash-anxiety!

Chris,
Can I borrow your wife for a few weeks? I have some painting I need done. I don't believe my wife would mind TOO MUCH...

Gip Winecoff

1882: "God is dead"--F. Nietzsche

1900: "Nietzsche is dead"--God

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, October 6, 2003 7:08 PM
Upnorth has hit the nail on the head with every one of his points here.
the model shop here in Riyadh is shutting and selling off at half price. So I bought a stack of kits, and for the first time ever I was faced with indecision, which one to build first?
Also, if you don't enjoy setting up the airbrush, DON'T! Go back to brush painting on a quickie model if need be. See how good a result you can get.
I don't airbrush at all, tried it years ago, didn't enjoy it. So I developed ways of spraying with a can & brush painting that give as good a result.
The end product is, I'm happy in my modelling & I DON'T GET STALLED.
Oh yes, I also don't buy resin detail, I scratch build it, and if I can't do that then I don't detail that bit, especially interiors that won't be seen.
So, enjoy!
Pete
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, October 6, 2003 9:25 PM
Madda hit my aircraft nail on the head, decalling. I've got a nice Hase A-7E finished, but for needing the other 80% of the decals set--which would get the "loose" bits assembled on, too.

But it is different things, too. I started an Italeri M1A1 because it had enough extra bits to be one of the transitional USMC Abrams tanks. All was going good, until I changed my mind about the diorama it was going in. Oh well, such is life.
  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: Philippines
Posted by Dwight Ta-ala on Monday, October 6, 2003 10:02 PM
Well, if i stop working on a certain model due to lack of motivation or just getting bored, then I just let myself off it for a while. Try to check out same models completed by others until I can hear myself say "hey, I can do better than that". That usually sends me off to the workbench. However, sometimes, interest does not come back so easily. So, I just take my time and wait. I don't like to work when I am not enjoying it.

We need a breather every once in a while.

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, October 8, 2003 5:54 PM
With the kind of models I build, I just put in the monster movie. Then I look at the model and use my minds eye to see what I want. I think now what would be so cool to do with this model, what would be a work of art.
Then I get back to the model and its prue passion to get it done.
Dale Model Art
http://community.webshots.com/user/dales_model_art
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, October 13, 2003 5:59 AM
I consider myself lucky that I'm in a place that has so much variety that I don't believe I could ever get bored from lack of subjects! I've got a FW-190, Swiss Hornet, M-998 Fuel Truck, Gundam & Ducati 916 motorcycle in the works!
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, October 14, 2003 5:49 PM
I hear you guys on the air brush set up. I usually get 4 or 5 models to the point of needing to be airbrushed and then do them all at once, once I am in an airbrushing mood. I just finished two A/C and a tank last weekend because they were all needing a final coat of future and some paint. I had just been putting of getting out the airbrush and having to clean it. Now with those three off the table ( a 1/48 Gee Bee, a 1/48 Shinden and a 1/72 scale Tiger) I am free to go to the closet and pick out three new boxes of fresh plastic. One is for sure Italeri's FA-18E in 1/48 but I haven't decided on the other two. I think I'll finish the M-113 I started a couple years ago.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, October 14, 2003 6:34 PM
I agree with most of you guys. To prevent the bordom I usually have 6 or maybe 8 models going at one time. By doing it this way I don't have a chance to become bored. I may also put away all models and concetrate on updating or some kind of improvent project for the shop.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, October 15, 2003 1:34 AM
Hey Dana,

I find myself putting the model away when it comes time to fill and sand seams. Oh how I hate it. I'll watch an aviation movie or read a book on aircraft and all of a sudden, I'm back to it. My problem is that I used to work at Central Hobbies here in town and I never got a paycheck due to buying models. LOL. Point is, I will never be short of models to put aside due to a lack of motivation so I might as well keep at it.

Mark
JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS
FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.