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Firewatch Cobra 1/72

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  • Member since
    July 2012
  • From: Perth
Firewatch Cobra 1/72
Posted by Allan Ingpen on Friday, September 20, 2019 8:22 AM

Something a bit different built for my dad.

The US Department of Forrestry uses old Cobras (called Firewatch Cobras) to scan and spot for fires. Information from these helicopters are then sent back to a van (all part oart of a package), which is then relayed to the much larger firebomber aircraft. 

The van was a Cararama fire engine type one, redone in white with the Firewatch badge on the side. The interior has been redone to show multiple computer consoles- guessing- like the real thing.

The helicopter is a Hasegawa AH-1S. I scratched the FLIR pod under the nose, opened the armour locker, and put in an equipment bag. Extra aerials and wire cutters are from Eduard. The decals are from Decal Draw (definitely worth a look at their site). 

Inside the cockpit, hanging up, is a pilot's helmet- I have hollowed it out, and added a mic boom and cord.

Fun topic.

Firewatch CobraFirewatch Cobra_2Firewatch Cobra_3Firewatch Cobra_4Firewatch Cobra_5Firewatch Cobra_6

Allan Ingpen

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Friday, September 20, 2019 9:50 AM

That looks great.   I really like the fire fighting aircraft.  Didnt know they used cobras. I'll have to add that to the to do list.  Really nice job.  Was your dad in the forrest service?

Thanks,

John

Ain't no reason to hang my head, I could wake up in the mornin' dead 

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Friday, September 20, 2019 10:37 AM

Re-utilization of former military assets makes so much sense, I don't understand why it isn't done more. Back, right after Vietnam, I had the idea to use OV-10 Broncos for fire spotting and aerial command and control. Finally someone in the field had the same idea and it happened. Like using the AH-1, great concept (though, I would probably have gone with the AH-1J Seacobra. Two engines gives you a little more insurance in hairy situations). Love your build, well thought out, great artwork.

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

  • Member since
    July 2012
  • From: Perth
Posted by Allan Ingpen on Sunday, September 22, 2019 10:33 AM

Thanks so much.

John - He wasn't. Long story short- he hates military stuff, but wanted to do a Short Sunderland- ended up a static display, and he painted it like a fire bomber. I love choppers, so found this one, then got him a Bronco and the decals (which he has done), and now he's set up a diorama of a fire fighting service getting ready to put wet stuff on hot stuff.

 

HooYah - Not sure about the twin- I was told (by a chopper pilot I worked with on a medical chopper) that if one engine goes down, the second one only makes the landing smoother. I.E. you can't keep flying for long. Not sure how true this is though. Maybe someone else has a better idea.

Tags: 1/72 , helicopter

Allan Ingpen

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Sunday, September 22, 2019 1:37 PM

Being former navy, we always go for twin engine vice singles whenever possible, It gives you a better chance to get back to the boat, or at least, out of the bad neighborhood. 

Back in the wildfire arena, Many years back I also had the idea of using cropdusters for fire suppression. It just made so much sense. They are designed for carrying a load and built for good observation. Finally somebody also came to that conclusion and bingo, it happened. I should copyright my ideas; I'd be rich!!! 

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

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