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Long Range Desert Group (completed)

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MAC
  • Member since
    July, 2009
  • From: Keyport, New Jersey
Long Range Desert Group (completed)
Posted by MAC on Monday, June 26, 2017 8:32 PM

The Long Range Desert Group  was a reconnaissance and raiding unit of the British Army during the Second World War.

Originally called the Long Range Patrol (

LRP), the unit was founded in Egypt in June 1940 by Major Ralph A. Bagnold, acting under the direction of General Archibald Wavell. Bagnold was assisted by Captain Patrick Clayton and Captain William Shaw. At first the majority of the men were from New Zealand, but they were soon joined by Southern Rhodesian and British volunteers, whereupon new sub-units were formed and the name was changed to the better-known Long Range Desert Group (LRDG). The LRDG never numbered more than 350 men, all of whom were voluntee

The

LRDG was formed specifically to carry out deep penetration, covert reconnaissance patrols and intelligence missions from behind Italian lines, although they sometimes engaged in combat operations. Because the LRDG were experts in desert navigation they were sometimes assigned to guide other units, including the Special Air Service and secret agents across the desert. During the Desert Campaign between December 1940 and April 1943, the vehicles of the LRDG operated constantly behind the Axis lines, missing a total of only 15 days during the entire period.[4] Possibly their most notable offensive action was during Operation Caravan, an attack on the town of Barce and its associated airfield, on the night of 13 September 1942. However, their most vital role was the 'Road Watch', during which they clandestinely monitored traffic on the main road from Tripoli to Benghazi, transmitting the intelligence to British Army Headquarters.

 

 

 

Thanks for looking

 

Mac

  

  • Member since
    April, 2007
  • From: Amarillo, TX.
Posted by captfue on Monday, June 26, 2017 11:07 PM

Nice work shows lots of action very well thougth out Dio.

Rules are overrated
  • Member since
    December, 2015
  • From: texas
Posted by DESooner on Tuesday, June 27, 2017 10:28 AM

I'm just starting on a WW2 N Africa diorama as well - mine will be German artillery, perhaps in a trench with the PAK18/36 and some figures. I'm just fleshing out the general layout now - what did you use for your sand? I think I will do a thin wood base, with styrofoam on top and DAS air clay for the ground, and then adhese sand to that for the base. I can cut the styrofoam for the trench and the artillery piece emplacement and shore it up with sandbags and popsicle sticks as wood sides. Might also add some type of structure, and maybe one of those German K75 motorcycle units for recon.

MAC
  • Member since
    July, 2009
  • From: Keyport, New Jersey
Posted by MAC on Tuesday, June 27, 2017 2:47 PM

DeSooner for the sand I used Celuclay and Valliajo sand texture

 

Tom

  

  • Member since
    July, 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Tuesday, July 04, 2017 5:08 PM

I dont think you gave them enough gas cans....

It's what ... 400 miles to the fuel dump?

Awsome work !

                      Dont worry about the thumbprint... paint it rust and call it "Battle damage" !

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Tuesday, July 04, 2017 6:37 PM

littletimmy
I dont think you gave them enough gas cans..

Actually, about half will be water cans.  I desert conditions you need about 1 gallon per man per day.  Really, really well conditioned folk fully acclimatized could get by on half that.

LRDG/SAS used a ton of captured German "Jerry" cans.  German water cans have a white cross about 4" wide (200mm IIRC) prominently painted on both faces.  The filler cap is a bit different, too, if not as prominently as on US water cans versus fuel cans.
German:

US can:


The old Tamiya kits have rather an egregious flaw in that none of the cans have three bars in the handles as they ought.  It's an annoyance in an otherwise great kit.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Tuesday, July 04, 2017 10:46 PM

Oh wow, nice work there!!!

"Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children that dragons can be killed." -G.K. Chesterton

 

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: North Pole, Alaska
Posted by richs26 on Tuesday, July 04, 2017 11:55 PM

USMC cans also have a different spout on them compared to USA cans.

 

http://olive-drab.com/od_mvg_jerry_can_markings.php

 

WIP:  Monogram 1/72 B-26 (Snaptite) as 73rd BS B-26, 40-1408, torpedo bomber attempt on Ryujo

Monogram 1/72 B-26 (Snaptite) as 22nd BG B-26, 7-Mile Drome, New Guinea

Minicraft 1/72 B-24D as LB-30, AL-613, "Tough Boy", 28th Composite Group

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Wednesday, July 05, 2017 1:06 AM

There are two types of metal US cans- one with a threaded screw type lid for POL products which accepts a nozzle spout, and one with a flip type lid for water. 

Above is the flip top water can

below is the screw top POL can with spout

 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Wednesday, July 05, 2017 1:10 AM

Nice dio.

 ''I am a Norfolk man, and I glory in being so''

  

On the bench: Hasegawa 1/32nd Ju 87G-2

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Wednesday, July 05, 2017 8:40 PM

All of the metal cans had three bar handles, too (which is a flaw in the old Tamiya "Jerry Can Set" too).

US water cans had a tan/mid-brown enamel interior.   Which would be tought to model at 1/35 unless a person recast cans in clear.

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: North Pole, Alaska
Posted by richs26 on Wednesday, July 05, 2017 9:39 PM

Repectfully Stik, the can that you show is a USA can with a screw lid.  The USMC had their own fuel cans made with a cam-lock lid and the same pear-shaped spout as the German/British fuel cans.  I had one for 20 years before it got tossed or given away.  Check here:

http://ww2jerrycans.com/

The water/food cans were lined and had a large round cam-lock lid.

Here are USMC fuel cans made by Conco:

http://ww2jerrycans.com/htm/usconco.ht

The US got the jerry can design from the Germans in 1939 when an American was traveling across Europe by car along with a German engineer.  They stopped in Berlin's Tempelhof Airport where the German military had stocked millions of cans for the impending invasion of Europe.  The German engineer gave the American three cans for use on the trip.  The engineer was later recalled before the war, and the Amerian was able to eventually return his car to the US along with the three cans.  He gave one to the USA who didn't really want it, but Army engineers at Holabird copied it and refined it in 1940.  The British were also given a copy which they put to good use instead of their flimsies.  The USMC took the basic shape but kept the German spout.

 

WIP:  Monogram 1/72 B-26 (Snaptite) as 73rd BS B-26, 40-1408, torpedo bomber attempt on Ryujo

Monogram 1/72 B-26 (Snaptite) as 22nd BG B-26, 7-Mile Drome, New Guinea

Minicraft 1/72 B-24D as LB-30, AL-613, "Tough Boy", 28th Composite Group

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Wednesday, July 05, 2017 10:00 PM

Rich, I did say there were two types of metal GI Jerry cans, one with a screw lid for POL, and one with a flip type for water. I used both types during my enlistment. Although the metal water cans were rapidly replaced with plastic ones early on. Later plastic POL cans also became more widespread.

this was the metal water can try we had in the Army with the flip top. The design is the same as back to WWII. 

I never served in the Marines, so I never came across their take on the GI Jerry can. However when I did work at a surplus store in my younger years, I did come across standard GI Jerry cans stamped USMC. Much of the GI surplus at our store came from DRMO at the local Marine bases of Camp Pendleton, Tustin, and El Toro MCASs. No other difference in them from the standard US marked types.

 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

MAC
  • Member since
    July, 2009
  • From: Keyport, New Jersey
Posted by MAC on Thursday, July 06, 2017 9:55 AM

Gents thanks for your comments

 

Mac

  

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Thursday, July 06, 2017 12:25 PM

Sorry for taking the discussion away from your work and onto something as arcane as Jerry can variations Wink Now back to the main topic...

Nice work on your LRDG/SAS diorama. Are some of those the Masterbox figures used with the Tamiya vehicle kits?

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

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