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Tirpitz in Trondheimsfjord

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  • Member since
    January 2015
Tirpitz in Trondheimsfjord
Posted by TheMongoose on Monday, November 9, 2020 9:51 PM

I finished this up in the Ships of the German Flag group build. Thought i would share it here for those of you who may not be looking into GB's for dioramas. The idea came to me when cleaning out a closet. My son had this railroad tunnel he had cut in half and set up for Dungeons & Dragons. It just hot me that it would be a great fjord rather than a trash can filler! Here's the setup...

 

It's May 31st 1942. The spotter planes alerted Tirpitz to incoming British aircraft. This time they decide to head for open ocean. The Kapitän zur See (KzS–Captain at Sea) Karl Topp is rushing back from the traditional Norwegian red farmhouse. A young Kapitänleutnant readies crewmen to meet him and prepare the Tirpitz for combat operations. The crew is scrambling to remove the camouflage so they can get underway. Cranes are bringing in planes and boats. Crewmen are pulling the tarps off boats. One young swabbie is being berated for sitting on dein Hintern.

 

The little control house at the stern mooring was painted this color light blue in 2011 so this brings a small element of the present to the historical scene. The ship itself is all out of the box. Red House and moorings are handmade. Water is foam, gesso, lacquer & acrylic paint, and gloss medium & varnish. Scenic Woodlands realistic water & water effects plus a myriad of their ground cover over an old railroad tunnel cut in half and repurposed. Of all things my favorite element is the red house lol Overall this is the best piece I have done to date. I'm really happy with how it ended up turning out. The biggest SAVE was the water. My original waves came out all drooped and fell flat. I put Gloss Gel  Medium on a toothpick and put crests on all the flat spots. Whew, what a save I think but I'll let you be the judge from here Beer

 

Here's a cool lesson...I was wondering about the white masts, it just seemed odd when I was building. I added the waterfall based on how often they show up in the local tourist pics. Then I looked at the diorama from the kitchen, about 15' away, and went ahaa so they Germans knew what they were doing when it came to camo. The mast represents the waterfalls!

In the pattern: King George V (back on the bench) - the Tamiya 1/350th version, and a dual build of my KittyHawk F-5's.

  • Member since
    June 2014
Posted by BrandonK on Monday, November 9, 2020 10:35 PM

Nice. That's awesome work. Definately something to be very proud of.

BK

On the bench: Alot !

On Deck: Alot more !

 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Monday, November 9, 2020 11:56 PM

Fantastic piece of work there.   Great details and the water/land work looks great. 

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Tuesday, November 10, 2020 11:24 AM

Oh Boy!

 Now that is well thought out and presented! Oh! When you going to do the " Guns of Navarrone"? LOL! Beautiful Job all around. Oh, one more thing, In many ship dios like this,folks forget one very important thing. You didn't . It's nice to see a ship with Mooring Lines going to the shore!

  • Member since
    January 2015
Posted by TheMongoose on Tuesday, November 10, 2020 12:01 PM

Tanker-Builder

Oh Boy!

 Now that is well thought out and presented! Oh! When you going to do the " Guns of Navarrone"? LOL! Beautiful Job all around. Oh, one more thing, In many ship dios like this,folks forget one very important thing. You didn't . It's nice to see a ship with Mooring Lines going to the shore!

 

Hey speaking of mooring lines, do you know if something should go between the ship and the concrete piers? It almost looks like there is something there in a shadowed pic I found from during the war but I can't tell. 

In the pattern: King George V (back on the bench) - the Tamiya 1/350th version, and a dual build of my KittyHawk F-5's.

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Sunday, November 15, 2020 8:05 PM

TheMongoose
Hey speaking of mooring lines, do you know if something should go between the ship and the concrete piers? It almost looks like there is something there in a shadowed pic I found from during the war but I can't tell

I am in no way informed on DKM mooring practices.

But, I would not be surprised if a "camel" were not used.

A Camel is a low, long, floating device designed to distribute loads along a hull.  They are made a mix of materials, wood, metal.  Some of them have sealed floatation chambers, and the rest is open to the sea.  Others are sealed up, but heavily dented from use. 

Some are blunt cylinders, some are canoe or kayak shaped, or in every mix of shapes in between.

They are a harbor thing, not made to any specification.

But used all over a given harbor.

Say you want to raft up several destoers on a single mooring.  You set a camel between each one in the raft and you can lash tight, rail to rail, and not worry about the hulls fouling, or superstructure overhang elements fouling, either.

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, November 16, 2020 9:24 PM

I don't think sher was tied up to the pier as those fjords are tidal zones.

I'm sure she was anchored to towers.

Also there were the nets that were supposed to stop torpedoes, although the X craft were able to get under them.

And bombing.

Stupid idea, Bismark and Tirpitz and Sharnhorst and Gneiess..

Steel of those things could have built 500 more U Boats.

Wonderful model and display. I've been to Trondheim a number of times and the place is beautiful.

 

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    January 2015
Posted by TheMongoose on Monday, November 16, 2020 10:44 PM

It's just so hard for me to tell, especially without any real knowledge about the way it would be done. Here's the best pic I found as i was doing my dio

In the pattern: King George V (back on the bench) - the Tamiya 1/350th version, and a dual build of my KittyHawk F-5's.

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Tuesday, November 17, 2020 7:49 PM

GMorrison
I don't think sher was tied up to the pier as those fjords are tidal zones.

Where you have fixed, hard, moorings like the ones still in many of the fjords, you need a "something" between the hull and the concrete mooring.

Hence, the camel.  put hte camel between the mooring and the vessel, then snub up as required.  *** line to keep you in, spring lines to keep you fore and aft.

Each of the watches monitor the lines and either take them in or let them out as the tide requires.

Fjords are odd creatures--deep, deep water, but very narrow.  So, no room to swing at anchor, and very deep anchorages, especially when fore-and-after mooing is nearly required.  I want to remember that the avearge anchorage in Norway runs 50-75m; which meand you are putting out right at a hlaf kilometer of cable and anchor both fore and aft.

IIRC, the DKM often stowed and anchor on the fantail of its ships, but I'm not remembering them having ground tackle capstans and the like.

And, in all fairness, I am basing this on how the US ships were moored in tight anchorages, too.

 

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Wednesday, November 18, 2020 8:21 AM

Hi;Bill,

        Das is the U-Booten Mechanish,Ya? Yer right. Lots more U-Boots could've been built. But, Then we would've been denied the awesome designs of these Behemoths! As warships go, except for some Japanese types and the Iowas they were some of the most beautiful warships afloat. I definitely cannot leave out the Italians.The design of the two I have seen, they were, No slouches either

        The sad fact for Germany is she had about exhausted herself, before Most had ever cleared the ways. Plus, they didn't have the Tactitions and Seamen to prosecute their actions properly and that coupled with being ham-strung where supplies of Fuel and other Necessities were concerned.

        If they'd had the leadership that were given the ability to fight them right, we would then all be speaking German! But their supreme Leader was a nutcase and didn't appreciate the valus of these tools. If you use a tool wrong, it's going to get ruined or discarded by the user or his or her neighbors!

  • Member since
    June 2018
  • From: Ohio (USA)
Posted by DRUMS01 on Wednesday, November 18, 2020 8:30 AM

Great job finalizing a great idea! Nice work MONGOOSE!

One question; In the photo the decks are not showing any camoflage paint but on your model there is (?). I am not fully versed in the story of the Tripitz, but I'm sure you have a reason for the deck camo. , regardless this is really nice work.

PS: good save on the water details.

Ben

I am a Veteran; to all other Veterans thank you for your service. Retired now and living well

PROJECTS:

- 1/48 RAH-66 Comanche - WIP

- 1/350 USS Alabama (GB) - DONE

- 1/16 1910 Thomas Flyer - DONE

- 1/78 AC-119 Stinger Gunship (GB) - DONE

 

 

 

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Wednesday, November 18, 2020 8:36 AM

Ah Yes; Mongoose,

 As Cap'n Mac has explained there might've been " Camels" in play. That would make sense what with tidal influences and such. Still gotta ask. Do you do model railroads?

 One more point I have to make. Although it is well done. The next time you do a small watercraft in a large sharp turn don't forget to rotate the deck outward in the turn. Unlike Bike and Motorcycle riders or Personal Watercraft riders, boats at speed lean toward the outside of turns.

  • Member since
    January 2015
Posted by TheMongoose on Wednesday, November 18, 2020 8:47 AM

DRUMS01

Great job finalizing a great idea! Nice work MONGOOSE!

One question; In the photo the decks are not showing any camoflage paint but on your model there is (?). I am not fully versed in the story of the Tripitz, but I'm sure you have a reason for the deck camo. , regardless this is really nice work.

PS: good save on the water details.

Ben

 

yep, no known pics of the deck during the timeframe i modeled, where the hull was camouflaged to match the fjord walls (very good pics of this so it's as accurate as i could make it). From what i read they assume it was painted but no one knows. The assumption seems based on this and other pics showing that they had done some painting, plus  painted tarps, on the turrets to camo them. So I took artistic license here to create a visually appealing model Big Smile

In the pattern: King George V (back on the bench) - the Tamiya 1/350th version, and a dual build of my KittyHawk F-5's.

  • Member since
    January 2015
Posted by TheMongoose on Wednesday, November 18, 2020 8:52 AM

Tanker-Builder

Ah Yes; Mongoose,

 As Cap'n Mac has explained there might've been " Camels" in play. That would make sense what with tidal influences and such. Still gotta ask. Do you do model railroads?

 One more point I have to make. Although it is well done. The next time you do a small watercraft in a large sharp turn don't forget to rotate the deck outward in the turn. Unlike Bike and Motorcycle riders or Personal Watercraft riders, boats at speed lean toward the outside of turns.

 

When i was a kid one of the guys on my paper route had a huge model railroad at his place he used to let me drive the trains and switch the track around. Great fun when you're 10 but no railroading since then Yes

Good info on pitching the boat toward the outside of the turn. Will make use of that for sure. I may even be able to do it now. Will see how well the gel medium is holding it in place. Always up for tips to improve!

In the pattern: King George V (back on the bench) - the Tamiya 1/350th version, and a dual build of my KittyHawk F-5's.

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