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Recreating Weathered Public Statues

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  • Member since
    September 2016
Recreating Weathered Public Statues
Posted by TheWaggishAmerican on Friday, January 1, 2021 12:57 AM

This may be a topic better served by the figure painting subforum but I figured I'd start here before bothing them. I am very inexperienced when it comes to figures and metal painting of any sort, but for an upcoming vignette I need to replicate a public statue (the kind often found in small towns and memorials across the US- sepcifically in this instance a fictiotous Veteran's memorial- a soldier or two atop a pedestal, IRL it'd be bronze [?]).

For this vignette, though, I want to make this thing ratty. It's been neglected for quite a while, and the final layer over everything will essentially be graffiti. 

Basically, what would you do to get this appearance? Any suggestions for how to paint the statue (shadow/highlight, if any), what would be a decent bronze to use, how to weather the bronze, that sort of thing. Also if you have any tips on how to make things (words/symbols) look spraypainted in 1/35 scale I'd love to hear them.

 

Thanks

 

TWA

youtube.com/c/thewaggishamerican

On the Bench- Mountains of homework and expanding college debt

 

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  • Member since
    December 2020
Posted by Anton on Friday, January 1, 2021 4:47 AM

For spraypaint tags, a soft coloring pencil could do the trick. Never done it myself, but seen on YouTube several examples that looked quite nice. (If I remember which ones, I'll post them.)

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Friday, January 1, 2021 5:30 AM

Hello!

My first tip would be to find photos of something the likes - bronze statues in this case, and then to look at them for a long time. Just then try to figure out how to get that look.

Then the material - might be bronze, but might also be stone. Stone is pretty easy to do - just paint the figure flat white and then apply wash to the whole figure - black, green (for moss or algae) or brown.

Hope it helps - have a nice day

PaweĊ‚

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Friday, January 1, 2021 6:50 AM

Head over to the paint aisle at the craft (not hobby) store.   They have various products to replicate copper & brass on craft statuettes made of papier-mâché or plaster.  They include verdegris weathering materials.  Most come with, or have available, instructions on their application.  I know I looked at such a product when I was considering weathering the copper hull on a sailing shi.  

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Friday, January 1, 2021 7:19 AM

Thing is - when you look at heavily weathered statues - they don't look metallic at all. That's why it is important to do some research and look at the real thing.

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Friday, January 1, 2021 8:05 AM

Pawel

Thing is - when you look at heavily weathered statues - they don't look metallic at all. That's why it is important to do some research and look at the real thing.

Quite right. Unless you're dealing with copper alloys (think Statue of Liberty), most oxidation tends toward chalky grey tones over the darker base metal. Dry-brushing is a great way to replicate this...but photos are your friend. Do a web search for the kind of thing you're looking for.

The real advantage of that kind of search is that you may turn up some little detail or display idea you hadn't thought of, that will add that last perfect bit of poignancy or realism to your diorama concept.

Good luck.

Greg

 George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
  • Member since
    July 2011
  • From: Armpit of NY
Posted by MJames70 on Friday, January 1, 2021 9:34 AM

This technique uses paints by Games Workshop for weathered bronze, but you can achieve the effect with other brands. Just they have their own special paint for verdigris. The technique is shown on a shield, but could easily be extended to an entire model. Master Box makes some 1/35 Civil War figures that might make good statue toppers. 
https://youtu.be/T4o-5HUFrx8

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Friday, January 1, 2021 11:44 AM

MJames70

. Master Box makes some 1/35 Civil War figures that might make good statue toppers.  

ICM also makes some ACW soldiers in 1:35 scale, injected plastic.   Both Union ...

... and Confederate

The Confederate trooper in the slouch hat reminds me of the statues I've seen around city halls throughout the South.   If your intended diorama with graffitti is a BLM theme, he may be the one for you.

  • Member since
    September 2016
Posted by TheWaggishAmerican on Friday, January 1, 2021 2:30 PM
I hadn't seen the ICM Confederate's, I'll have to give those a peak... The whole thing isn't strictly BLM themed but the idea was inspired by the riots. It's a near-future soft-apocalypse setting, and I'm tossing around the idea of "End of the Empire" for the title. It is supposed to represent the sort of street fighting and civilian terrorism that a 21st century civil war would present, with one or two of each side fighting across the wasted monument. Original idea was to go for a kinda generic memorial with a WWII Marine or something as the central statue but I really like that confederate kit you linked; maybe a confederate and a later warrior standing together and have it be a generic southern vet memorial instead of a memorial to any specific conflict. Also thanks for the weathering suggestions everyone, I dug a few old half-finished 35th scale guys out of the spares box and am going to try em all out.

youtube.com/c/thewaggishamerican

On the Bench- Mountains of homework and expanding college debt

 

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  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Saturday, January 2, 2021 9:03 PM

Public statues are often "larger than life" so you might want to look at 1/24 or 90mm figures.

Bronze statues cast since about 2000 have a heavy epoxy 'lacquer' "patina" (which is really a deep brown/black finish) coating them.  That finish is supposed to have a 50 year lifespan with 'ordinary maintenance.'

Now, it turns out paint strippers and paint removers (like as used to remove previous graffiti) will strip the protective finish off, and leave a very brass sort of color to the statue.  Which goes green very rapidly.

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Sunday, January 3, 2021 11:32 AM

You all have forgotten one big thing common to all public statues .  .  . lots of pigeon poop (or doves, depending on where the piece is; city or country scene). This is especially important if the piece is neglected.

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

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