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New to Resin Parts- Ejection Seat

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  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Iowa- USA
New to Resin Parts- Ejection Seat
Posted by toadwbg on Thursday, March 6, 2003 10:38 AM
I've just gotten back into the hobby and decided to try out some of the great looking resin aftermarket stuff- in this case an ACES 2 Ejection Seat in 1/48 scale for my old Monogram f-15 which I am refirbishing.

The question is this: The seat is supplied on a resin block which I will need to remove from the seat. The seat is fragile and I don't want to destroy it. What is the best way to seperate them? I am fearful to use a #11 hobby blade!

Thanks
"I love modeling- it keeps me in the cool, dark, and damp basement where I belong" Current Projects: 1/48th Hasegawa F-14D- 25% 1/48th Tamiya Spitfire- 25%
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, March 6, 2003 10:52 AM

Hi Toadwbg, good question!

I tend to use a rasorsaw (You can get X-acto fitment), flat file or nail board (Ask the wife!), then finish up with wet 'n dry, used wet.

The important thing is to WEAR A MASK! The warnings aren't joking, and the dust from this material is awful
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, March 6, 2003 5:37 PM
Dremel, cut off wheel, and a mask (The dust is UNREAL)
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, March 6, 2003 6:33 PM
razer saw, #11, 600 sandpaper, 100 sandpaper, wash in warm water, paint, install
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Niagara Falls NY
Posted by Butz on Thursday, March 6, 2003 10:27 PM
Toadwbg,
I use the fine saw that comes in the Verlinden set (Large , Medium and fine 2x). Using this style of a saw gives me a less of a chance of ruining my seat(s).Then I use the seats base(block) as a stand.
What I mean is I use a small drill bit and drill into the base and the bottom of the seat(hand drill of course). After that the base turns into a nice painting stand(means no holding of the actual seat). I dont throw the old seat bases away cause they come in handy w/ other seats. Hope this helps ya. Flaps up, Mike

  If you would listen to everybody about the inaccuracies, most of the kits on your shelf would not have been built Too Close For Guns, Switching To Finger

  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Iowa- USA
Posted by toadwbg on Friday, March 7, 2003 7:46 AM
Lots of great advice-thanks to all.

I will try the dremel with sanding disk. I got one in the garage. Thanks for the tip about the dust too, I got allergies, asthma and my wife's pregnant!

"I love modeling- it keeps me in the cool, dark, and damp basement where I belong" Current Projects: 1/48th Hasegawa F-14D- 25% 1/48th Tamiya Spitfire- 25%
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: New Zealand
Posted by nzgunnie on Friday, March 7, 2003 1:46 PM
A razor saw gives the best control for delicate pieces, any good hobby store will stock them. Once you have sawn it off, use a full sheet of 600 sandpaper taped down on a flat surface to sand the bottom of the seat flat. It is best to use wet sanding, as the resin dust is not very good for you, and wet sanding will help reduce the amount of dust in the air.
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