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1/72 C-130E(I) Rivet Clamp Special Operations Aircraft - WIP

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  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Florida USA
1/72 C-130E(I) Rivet Clamp Special Operations Aircraft - WIP
Posted by Striker8241 on Monday, August 07, 2017 11:06 AM

This build was originally posted on the ARC Forums website, but because of Photobucket's recent ransom attack, all my images there are blocked. The build was almost finished and only lacked painting and some final details, so I've decided to replicate it here in a trimmed-down version before finishing it.

In 1971, while stationed at Nha Trang AB, Vietnam, I was fortunate to work on four C-130E(I) Rivet Clamp aircraft assigned to the 90th SOS that conducted special operations under the code name "Stray Goose". These were specially modified C-130E aircraft that were painted in a black and green camouflage scheme, which gave them a very sinister look. The Rivet Clamp aircraft were later upgraded and re-designated as MC-130s or Combat Talons.

 
 
 
Their many unique modifications included terrain-following radar, ECM sensors. Low Light Level TV, and a ground sensor for locating vehicles on the Ho Chi Min trail. Many of the sensors they carried would later be used on the AC-130 gunships, but the Rivet Clamp aircraft carried no weapons. The Clamps also carried a host of special navigational gear and radios. And they were equipped with the Fulton aerial pickup system, made famous in the movie "The Green Berets".
 
 
I was an ECM technician assigned to First Flight Detachment which was, at that time, part of the 90th SOS. Our primary job was supporting the C-123K "Black Bat" aircraft, but we also supported two defensive systems on the Clamps that their own ECM techs were not qualified to maintain.
 
 
The C-130 aircraft I've decided to model is aircraft 64-0555, "Triple Nickel" (shown above in the first photo) using Italeri's 1/72 C-130E/H kit No. 015. I'll be modifying the nose with a Flightpath C-130E-1/HC-130H/HC130P Conversion Set and some PE detail from Flightpath's C-130 Hercules Detail Set. Everything else is scratch built.
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

  • Member since
    March, 2015
  • From: Streetsboro, Ohio
Posted by Toshi on Monday, August 07, 2017 11:35 AM

That's a nice kit and I like your AM parts!  Wow, lots of PE.  I'll be following.

Toshi

P.S. Yes, I too became a victim of PB.  I now use Flickr.  I lost all my photos on this forum.  2 years of builds!

 

Retired due to work related injury

Married to the most caring, loving, understanding, and beautiful wife in the world.  Mrs. Toshi

 

ON THE BENCH:

Revell B-17G Flying Fortress 

NEXT BUILD:

Mrs. Toshi just purchased for me a Tamiya 1/48 Ki-61 via eBay, when it arrives, as always, I’ll do a WIP.  Thanks to M.Brindos and Model Maniac for the heads up and the inspiration in obtaining this kit for my next build.

  • Member since
    August, 2017
  • From: Lexington, KY.
Posted by Got Plastic? on Monday, August 07, 2017 11:45 AM

Striker,

Fantastic project. With your knowledge and personal experience with this beautiful aircraft this should be one for the books. I hope you enjoy every second of this build. I will definitely be here watching.

Chris

 

On The Bench: Coming Soon Big Smile

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Striker8241 on Monday, August 07, 2017 12:14 PM

 I wanted to detail the crew cabin and the cargo hold. The Rivet Clamp cargo hold included what I'll call the"Talon" compartment where the ground sensor, ECM equipment and some special radio equipment consoles were located.

In order to be able to see the detail in the crew cabin and cargo hold, I've cut out a section of the top of the aircraft that will be removable, as shown below.
 
 
I also started detailing the lower deck equipment bay, the galley and the navigator's position. I modified the kit supplied navigator's seat and added seat belts. I also added the circuit breaker panels along the sides of the flight deck.
 
 
 
The greenish interior color was an early E-model feature, but it soon got to me and I replaced it with a gray and black scheme.
 
 
 

The Italeri's flight deck was incorrect, as was the rear cabin bulkhead so I made my own versions of both.

The picture below shows the raised deck for the pilot,co-pilot and engineer's seats temporarily in place. I also went ahead and scratch built and detailed the center console. It was necessary to get the raised deck and console in place to accurately position the main instrument panel which I added next.

The picture below shows the raised flight deck with the center console in place and seats painted. The scratch built rudder pedals are a bit large but they won't be seen very well anyway, so I didn't change them.

Heres my scratchbuilt main instrument panel (MIP or IP) next to the kit IP.

And here's the completed flight deck with another picture showing it installed in the aircraft.

 
I had to install most of the interior detail in one side of the fuselage or the other, so I chose the right side. All the interior detail had to be completed before the fuselage could be closed.
 

With the right side fuselage cockpit detail done, I had to add the details to the left side fuselage half. The PE nose gear steering wheel was way too small so I made one from sheet plastic. Here's the finished cockpit area with the halves temporarily held together. Now I could go on to the cargo deck detail.

Here's a photo of the overhead instrument panel.

 

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Striker8241 on Monday, August 07, 2017 12:17 PM

Thanks Chris and Toshi! Glad to have you both aboard!

Cheers,

Russ

 

  • Member since
    March, 2008
Posted by mig23 on Monday, August 07, 2017 12:50 PM

Tracked you down Russ ! :)

Looking forward to seeing this thing come out the spray barn !

 

Cheers,

Haydn.

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Striker8241 on Monday, August 07, 2017 2:14 PM

Hay, Haydn! Smile  Ya, me too, bud. I've started with the bottom but RLI keep getting in the way. Hope to get most of it done this week.

Cheers,

Russ

 

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by USAF 462 / 2W1 on Monday, August 07, 2017 2:27 PM

All signed up and following along Russ. Looking forward to the updates.

 

Steve

OPERATION "DELIBERATE GUARD", "SOUTHERN WATCH", "ENDURING FREEDOM" and, "IRAQI FREEDOM" Veteran

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Striker8241 on Monday, August 07, 2017 3:14 PM

The "Talon" compartment occupied almost a third of the cargo deck in the Rivet Clamp version. Later in the Talon upgrade, two of the consoles were removed leaving only the forward console. The 2nd Navigator and equipment, many of the special radios and a lot of the ECM gear were moved up into the flight cabin.

Before I could add the consoles, I had to add at least some of the details on the bulkhead and along the sides. The first picture shows the right half details, the second the left half. The upper rack on the left side is the LS (life support) rack. The crew parachutes are hanging below and the ladders were used to reach the hatches on the roof.

That lonely troop seat on the right side was right up against the removable wall that separated the Talon compartment from the rest of the cargo bay. Later, a similar troop seat would be added to the left side.

This next photo shows the upper removable section with detail added. Those long green things are air ducts. They are part of the detail added to the removable roof section.

Below are some shots of the detail added to the roof section. The ducting would be added last.

The tan section in the photo below is the ceiling over the flight deck.

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Striker8241 on Monday, August 07, 2017 4:26 PM

Next are some photos of the evolution of the Talon compartment detail, starting with the main console.

Since I didn't have any pictures of the actual Talon compartment, I went by some of the pictures of the later Talon I. They were probably pretty much the same since space on the aircraft was extremely limited. The pictures below show the main equipment rack and a rack near the troop door that I suspect was there. I can't remember exactly.

Here's a shot of the partition at the back of the compartment. A black curtain covered the entryway when passengers and non-cleared personnel were present. The Talon compartment was a classified area.

And here are some shots of the completed compartmnent.

Here are some pictures of the detail inside the ramp area.

And here are the two finished halves.

 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Monday, August 07, 2017 4:28 PM

Hello Russ!

This one is just fantastic! I always wanted to build one of those, but the references are just non-existent - those birds were so top-secret, and after that they modified them over and over and over and nowadays even if you found one such aircraft it looks completely different. So your "been there, done that" might be the only source of knowledge available! On top of that your detailing is top notch! Those instrument panels, those ducts look very good! So good luck with your build and thanks a lot for sharing, have a nice day

PaweĊ‚

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Striker8241 on Monday, August 07, 2017 5:25 PM

Hi, Pawel!

Thanks for the good words!

Cheers,

Russ

 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Striker8241 on Monday, August 07, 2017 5:59 PM

This  kit is pretty good overall, but there were some areas that needed upgrading. I started with the main landing gear. The gear wells and main strut assemblies were almost totally inacurate. I threw away the kit gear wells and made my own and then I modified the strut assemblies, as shown below.

I made a few changes to the nose gear as well.

 One final important feature had to be added...the ECM chaff ports on either side just ahead of the troop doors. The model doesn't show them and that's not surprising since the aircraft were classified and not many photos of them exist. Below is one that shows the ports on the left side. They're shown just above the guy that's sitting on the fire extinguisher.

Below is my rendering of the chaff ports and some details that were added inside.

This is a model of a single chaff dispenser that held two chaff magazines. There were 8 dispensers, 4 on either side, with a total of 16 magazines (same setup as in the B-52D).

This picture shows the right side dispensers and magazines mounted in their cabinet (with the doors removed). The next picture shows the left side with just a cabinet.

Now the fuselage was ready to be closed up.

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Striker8241 on Monday, August 07, 2017 6:34 PM

Once the fuselage was closed up, I addressed the cockpit windows. I've never liked the way the thick clear plastic canopy looks so I decided to make my own. I used the canopy as a template and built the window frame out of thin styrene strips. I'll use glazing for the windows.

Later, after the new nose was on, I sanded down the window frame until it was flush with the body.

 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Striker8241 on Monday, August 07, 2017 6:36 PM

The nose radome, as it came in the FlightPath AM kit was not correct for a Rivet Clamp aircraft. The radome was too long, and it was not shaped correctly. I had to cut off about 5 mm and do a lot of sanding and filling to get it to the right shape. Below is what it looked like before modifying it, and afterwards.

 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Northern California
Posted by jeaton01 on Monday, August 07, 2017 7:40 PM

Interesting build, very convincing.

John

To see build logs of my models, go here: http://goldeneramodel.com/mymodels/mymodels.htm

  

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Monday, August 07, 2017 9:08 PM

Hmmm;

 Being as how the C-130 in any model is my really favorite non Sea-Plane prop driven bird  , I certainly like what you've done here .Very nice .

  • Member since
    October, 2009
Posted by Ultra on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 2:08 AM

First, thank you for your sevice.  Second, wow what a ton of dimension and depth to that interior.  Really enjoyed everything you posted so far here.

  • Member since
    March, 2015
  • From: Streetsboro, Ohio
Posted by Toshi on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 2:17 AM

Wow, you're doing a fantastic job on this kit!  Your IP scratch building is superb as well as every single attention to detail you've put into this.  What great project!

Toshi

 

Retired due to work related injury

Married to the most caring, loving, understanding, and beautiful wife in the world.  Mrs. Toshi

 

ON THE BENCH:

Revell B-17G Flying Fortress 

NEXT BUILD:

Mrs. Toshi just purchased for me a Tamiya 1/48 Ki-61 via eBay, when it arrives, as always, I’ll do a WIP.  Thanks to M.Brindos and Model Maniac for the heads up and the inspiration in obtaining this kit for my next build.

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 2:25 AM

Russ, wow, thats another really amazing build andyour attention to detail is first rate.

What do you make of the Flightpath conversion. I'm looking at getting an Italeri Herc and useing the flightpath conversion to do a stretched RAF version.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

  

On the bench: Trumpeter 1/35th AS90   

  • Member since
    August, 2013
Posted by Jay Jay on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 7:23 AM

Fabulous scratch building I must say. You Sir, have some mad skills. What a model building advantage to have actually worked in and on this aircraft.  Also to rebuild the canopy structure is just above and beyond .Bow Down

 

 

 

 

 

 I'm finally retired. Now time I got, money I don't.

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Striker8241 on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 8:46 AM

jeaton01

Interesting build, very convincing.

 

Thanks, John, and thanks for looking in!

Cheers,

Russ

 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Striker8241 on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 8:47 AM

Tanker - Builder

Hmmm;

 Being as how the C-130 in any model is my really favorite non Sea-Plane prop driven bird  , I certainly like what you've done here .Very nice .

 

Thanks, Tanker - Builder!

Cheers,

Russ

 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Striker8241 on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 8:50 AM

Ultra

First, thank you for your sevice.  Second, wow what a ton of dimension and depth to that interior.  Really enjoyed everything you posted so far here.

 

You're most welcome, Ultra. And thank you for your support, and for the good words!

Cheers,

Russ

 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Striker8241 on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 9:04 AM

Bish

Russ, wow, thats another really amazing build andyour attention to detail is first rate.

What do you make of the Flightpath conversion. I'm looking at getting an Italeri Herc and useing the flightpath conversion to do a stretched RAF version.

 

Hi, Bish, and welcome! Many thanks for the good words!

Are you talking about a stretched version of one of the special ops C-130s? The Flightpath conversion I bought was really not correct for any Herc with the Fulton pickup system. None of them, as far as I know, had those two grooves in the radome to accomodate the yoke forks. And the radome is not the right shape for either the Rivet Clamp or the Talon I, although it looks about right for the Talon II. You would just need to fill in those gooves and you might have to widen it a bit toward the top on both sides.

The J-model Herc looks to have the traditionaly shaped nose so you shouldn't need the conversion.

Cheers,

Russ

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Striker8241 on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 9:09 AM

Jay Jay

Fabulous scratch building I must say. You Sir, have some mad skills. What a model building advantage to have actually worked in and on this aircraft.  Also to rebuild the canopy structure is just above and beyond .Bow Down

 

Thanks, Jay Jay! I really appreciate the compliments!

Cheers,

Russ

 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Striker8241 on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 9:12 AM

USAF 462 / 2W1

All signed up and following along Russ. Looking forward to the updates.

 

Steve

 

Hi, Steve and welcome! Thanks for coming aboard! Sorry if I missed your post earlier.

Cheers,

Russ

 

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 9:17 AM

Striker8241

 

 
Bish

Russ, wow, thats another really amazing build andyour attention to detail is first rate.

What do you make of the Flightpath conversion. I'm looking at getting an Italeri Herc and useing the flightpath conversion to do a stretched RAF version.

 

 

 

Hi, Bish, and welcome! Many thanks for the good words!

Are you talking about a stretched version of one of the special ops C-130s? The Flightpath conversion I bought was really not correct for any Herc with the Fulton pickup system. None of them, as far as I know, had those two grooves in the radome to accomodate the yoke forks. And the radome is not the right shape for either the Rivet Clamp or the Talon I, although it looks about right for the Talon II. You would just need to fill in those gooves and you might have to widen it a bit toward the top on both sides.

The J-model Herc looks to have the traditionaly shaped nose so you shouldn't need the conversion.

Cheers,

Russ

 

 

No, its not a special Op version, just a standard transport. The RAF use both lengthered and standard versions and Flightpath does the extension plug for it. I have never used any of there resins sets and just woundered what you thought it it.

The other option i have is from Wingman models which is a lot morte epensive but includes engines and other resin parts so just looking at the options.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

  

On the bench: Trumpeter 1/35th AS90   

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Striker8241 on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 9:33 AM

One correction I forgot to mention - the kit rendering of the auxilary power unit (APU) at the front of the left sponson was almost non existant. I cut open the air intake port and added a recessed compartment and the doors. I also drilled out the two exhaust ports and scribed the panels around them. The "guts" of the APU that appear through the intake port is actually just a photo reproduction glued to the inside. So to are the mesh screens for the exhausts.

Also, the ram air vent above the APU was too big, so I filled it in from the back (red color).

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Florida USA
Posted by Striker8241 on Tuesday, August 08, 2017 9:43 AM

Oh, sorry Bish Embarrassed. I've got nose radomes on the brain...Smile. I haven't tried that particular mod yet. But my old Pappy always told me.. buy the best you can afford Big Smile

Cheers,

Russ

 

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