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Aluminum Foil landing gear piston question

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  • Member since
    September, 2014
Aluminum Foil landing gear piston question
Posted by rooster513 on Saturday, October 07, 2017 12:16 PM

So I've seen a couple people on here use aluminum foil to cover the piston portion of landing gears. I like the clean shiny look this gives but been struggling to get it to stay in place and look clean. Anyone have a process/tips for doing this??

-Andy

  • Member since
    March, 2005
Posted by philo426 on Saturday, October 07, 2017 12:22 PM

You might be better off using Bare metal foil or Alclad.

  • Member since
    June, 2013
Posted by bvallot on Saturday, October 07, 2017 1:36 PM

Rooster, I've been using a strong white glue to adhere the foil. Nothing too fancy. Just be sure to cut the appropriate width as best you can and only use a small dab so as not to create a mess. The less you fuss with it the better. You shouldn't need a long length of it either. 1cm ought to suffice. Also ensure the surface of the strut is smooth without any raised seams. 

That'll do ya! =]

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Lacey, WA.
Posted by M. Brindos on Sunday, October 08, 2017 12:22 PM

Most of us are using Bare Metal Foil for such applications. It's super thin and self adhesive. 

Its much easier to use than standard kitchen foil.

Unless you're covering an entire model a sheet will last you for years. It's worth the investment.  :)

- Mike Brindos

Figure Painting Moderator -- Genessis-Models

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, October 08, 2017 12:27 PM

I now use a chrome paint.  As long as you use flat aluminum for the strut itself, a good chrome silver gives good contrast.  Also, there are some chrome striping tapes in 1/16 and 1/32 inch.  I have used those- they are self adhesive.  When I used bare metal foil, I just cut it into a strip as long as needed, and the adhesive on the bare metal foil was enough.

For white struts, the chrome silver still works well.  It clearly defines the oleo area.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Sunday, October 08, 2017 12:33 PM

M. Brindos

Most of us are using Bare Metal Foil for such applications. It's super thin and self adhesive. 

Its much easier to use than standard kitchen foil.

Unless you're covering an entire model a sheet will last you for years. It's worth the investment.  :)

 

Im with Mike about the BMF but IMO, not really needed unless the scale is 1/32 or larger. 

I generally use chrome paint for such applications and works out very well.

  • Member since
    September, 2014
Posted by rooster513 on Sunday, October 08, 2017 5:58 PM

Thanks for the advice all! I think I'll look into some chrome paint for future builds. 

-Andy

  • Member since
    January, 2003
Posted by Darren Roberts on Sunday, October 08, 2017 7:09 PM

I recently discovered a chrome silver paint pen. I got it at my local hobby shop. It is absolutely fantastic. It gives a perfectly smooth chrome finish and comes in varying widths. I use the smallest one. It's also great for chrome trim if you're a car builder.

  • Member since
    September, 2014
Posted by rooster513 on Sunday, October 08, 2017 7:47 PM

 

Darren Roberts

I recently discovered a chrome silver paint pen. I got it at my local hobby shop. It is absolutely fantastic. It gives a perfectly smooth chrome finish and comes in varying widths. I use the smallest one. It's also great for chrome trim if you're a car builder.

 

That sounds interesting Darren. What's the brand?

-Andy

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, October 08, 2017 8:29 PM

One thing about this exercise. Do look at photos of the aircraft on the ground. For some reason some kit companies mold the part in the extended position.

  • Member since
    March, 2006
Posted by simpilot34 on Monday, October 09, 2017 1:48 AM

Putting foil on the struts seems like too much fuss to me. A good friend of mine that has won several first place trophies and a best of show, uses apprpriately sized drill bits for his oleos. He cuts out the oleo part and drills out the strut from the bottom into main part of strut deep enough for a good seat, polishes and cuts off drill bit shank and putties the hole at the bottom. Most realistic oleos I have ever seen. They really do have the right shade and look! Just another technique to kick around.

Cheers, Lt. Cmdr. Richie "To be prepared for war, is one of the most effectual means of preserving the peace."-George Washington
  • Member since
    September, 2013
Posted by blackdog62 on Monday, October 09, 2017 3:13 PM

my problem is marking a nice seem.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, October 09, 2017 8:19 PM

Ritchie- wouldn't it rust?

  • Member since
    June, 2014
Posted by BrandonK on Tuesday, October 10, 2017 9:53 AM

I use aluminum tape. It's made for heating and cooling ducting in homes and can be found in hardware stores. The role works well as it is thin and adhesive backed and can also be used as the reflector in lamps. I have had my role for a few decades and I have enough to last the rest of my life.

BK

On the bench: 2x Monogram 1/48 Kingfishers with cockpits and floats, full kit overhauls each

1/32 Kitty Hawk OS2U Kingfisher

  • Member since
    March, 2006
Posted by simpilot34 on Friday, October 13, 2017 7:01 PM

GMorrison

Ritchie- wouldn't it rust?

 

Bondo, the models of his I saw had been in his display case several years and had no signs of rust that I saw. I'm sure a light coat of clear would alleviate any worries though.

Cheers, Lt. Cmdr. Richie "To be prepared for war, is one of the most effectual means of preserving the peace."-George Washington
  • Member since
    September, 2014
Posted by rooster513 on Friday, October 13, 2017 7:53 PM

BrandonK

I use aluminum tape. It's made for heating and cooling ducting in homes and can be found in hardware stores. The role works well as it is thin and adhesive backed and can also be used as the reflector in lamps. I have had my role for a few decades and I have enough to last the rest of my life.

BK

 

That's a good idea BK. I may have to give that a shot.

-Andy

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: hamburg michigan
Posted by fermis on Friday, October 13, 2017 11:26 PM

Personally, I really like Testors "silver" (1/4oz square jar), as the very last thing I do. I put it on a little heavy, dries nice and shiney! I have used aluminum tape in the past, and it looks great, but you're left with a seam and the adhesive gives way over time. I have also used aluminum rod/tubing with great results (similar to the drill bit idea, mentioned already).

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