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What are the SPECIFIC areas to weather?

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fox
  • Member since
    January, 2007
  • From: Narvon, Pa.
Posted by fox on Wednesday, May 16, 2018 9:09 PM

My 2 cents. Everything above sounds good on the right plane at the right time. The only thing I can add is the weathering on the shell ejection ports on the underside of the wing. A small amount of gunpowder residue in the direction of the airflow is OK for a plane seeing moderate to heavy action.

Hope that this helps you a little.

Jim  Captain

Photobucket Main WIP: Rebuild of Monogram 1/8 "Big Deuce" with 1/8 Pocher V-12 in rear - 10%

   On the Bench:   Revell 1/48 Ju 52/3m - 50%;  Revell 1/96 USS Kearsarge - 20% 

I keep hitting "escape", but I'm still here.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, May 16, 2018 9:08 AM

You have everything right except rust on control surface rusting on navy planes.  They are pretty much protected, plus control surfaces are either aluminum or fabric covered.  As far as hydraulic fluid (red or pink), landing gear areas and bottom surfaces near doors, maybe some hatches or removable panels.  Sometimes, trailing edges of flaps.

Also, visit local airports.  Hydraulic fluid, exhaust stains, in fact most weathering except gun barrels, will be the same on civil birds as military, except maybe to a lessor degree.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    August, 2012
  • From: Parker City, IN.
Posted by Rambo on Wednesday, May 16, 2018 3:13 AM

GMorrison

Don't use other models for reference.

Find photographs.

exactly build yourself up a library of reference material from either photos you find online or in books.

 

Clint

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Wednesday, May 16, 2018 12:53 AM

Also take into account things like service life. Many WWII aircraft had comparatively speaking short life spans. And operational tempo dictated how much they actually flew. 

While certain types such as transports and patrol aircraft may have had longer lifespans, fighters and bombers typically had shorter ones.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, May 15, 2018 11:29 PM

Don't use other models for reference.

Find photographs.

Don't use restorations for reference.

Look at real life stuff like construction equipment.

Above all, make an effort to answer your own questions. Eliminates bad data.

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Tuesday, May 15, 2018 10:26 PM

Many WWII aircraft, especially single engined, operated from rough forward airfields. So mud, dirt, and/or dust on the landing gear and adjacent areas is a good touch. It’s very theater and time specific as what to do.

Also aircraft operating in the desert or from crushed coral airstrips often had the propeller blades scoured to one degree or another by the sand kicked up. 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    April, 2018
What are the SPECIFIC areas to weather?
Posted by Oxboy on Tuesday, May 15, 2018 9:06 PM

I would like to learn to apply the appropriate weathering to the appropriate areas on a military aircraft.  What are the most common areas on the aircraft that make the most sense to weather (due to real-life function, location, exposure, wear-and-tear, etc), and what does that weathering look like visually?  Let me start the discussion with my own very novice thoughts that I have researched (please correct where I am off base):

Exhaust blackening/discoloration behind exhaust nozzles

Dark blast smudges around gun barrel tips

Where will you most likely see oil/fuel/hydraulic streaks?  Out of which panels/vents?

Chips/scratches showing aluminum/steel on leading edges of props, noses, wings, tails, weapons, intakes, etc.

Wingroot footstep damage on WWII planes

Rust/discoloration/oxidation on control surfaces on sea-based/navy planes?

What am I missing?  Please contribute! Smile

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