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Replacing a ruined clear part

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  • Member since
    February, 2019
Replacing a ruined clear part
Posted by A1987 on Sunday, March 10, 2019 12:26 AM

So I idiotically ruined a part of my Tamiya Me-262 canopy...And panicking went to down on it with sanding and polishing but probably did worse as I have no real idea what I am doing (first model, pay to learn I guess). 

Is there a chance of getting just the clear sprue for a kit? Or will I have to pay another 40$ or so for a whole new kit? 

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Sunday, March 10, 2019 1:18 AM

That will depends on the company and there response. Some are good at replaceing parts, others not. I ruined the canopy on my 72nd Academy AH-64. After several months i gave up and bought a second kit, but that was only £12. I am guessing your kit is 48th scale, i did search for vac form canopies but could only find them in 72nd.

'I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so'

On the bench: Airfix 1/600 HMS Belfast

                      AMT Trade Federation Tank

  • Member since
    February, 2019
Posted by A1987 on Sunday, March 10, 2019 1:46 AM

Yes it is in 1:48. 

I decided to try my luck contacting Tamiya and their UK dealer to try and get a replacement part. Meanwhile I will contnue efforts to polish the piece possibly more albow grease. It's already ruined so might as well give it more effort.

 

  • Member since
    January, 2019
Posted by Edwin on Sunday, March 10, 2019 5:28 AM

A1987

Yes it is in 1:48. 

I decided to try my luck contacting Tamiya and their UK dealer to try and get a replacement part. Meanwhile I will contnue efforts to polish the piece possibly more albow grease. It's already ruined so might as well give it more effort.

 

 

Post a pic of the canopy. Perhaps after seeing how it is now, some members may be able to help suggest solutions to get your canopy back to good condition.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, March 10, 2019 6:32 AM

Micromark sells two different vacuforming machines.  Even the smaller one, at a hundred bucks, is far more expensive than your kit.  However, a vacuform is a neat tool to have.  So if you bought one as an investment, intending to make more vacuformed parts later, it wouldn't be so bad in cost.  MM also sells clear plastic for using in vacuform machines.

I have the old Mattel machine, but the heater has gone out.  I bought a cheap little vacuum pump and intend to try to build my own machine.  I guess if my attempt doesn't work out I'll try that MM one.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    August, 2015
  • From: the redlands Fl
Posted by crown r n7 on Sunday, March 10, 2019 6:51 AM

I’m sorry about your canopy it does happen . I’ve trashed my share but what caused the trouble in the first place ?

Nick

  • Member since
    February, 2019
Posted by A1987 on Sunday, March 10, 2019 7:23 AM

crown r n7

I’m sorry about your canopy it does happen . I’ve trashed my share but what caused the trouble in the first place ?

 

 

For there are two clear parts that need be glued to each other and the contact spot is not visible when the model is assembled. I thought I can manage to use regular cement on the contact spot and not get it over the parts. I probably could but being clumsy and tired I ended up getting a bunch of cement on the parts.

  • Member since
    August, 2012
  • From: Parker City, IN.
Posted by Rambo on Sunday, March 10, 2019 8:41 AM
on clear parts the best thing to use is some type of white glue. I like modge podge for this. Don't use CA it will fog the clear, Tamiya extra thin and the like can also wick and cause spots to appear on the clear parts.

Clint

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Sunday, March 10, 2019 10:19 AM

Ye, normal glues are not good for clear parts. You can use CA glue if you have to but you need to have ventelkation in the canopy. I use Evostik wood glue.

'I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so'

On the bench: Airfix 1/600 HMS Belfast

                      AMT Trade Federation Tank

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, March 10, 2019 10:47 AM

You could try plunge molding, sometimes called smash molding.

Here's a general description. Get a piece of clear thermo sensitive plastic. A good source is the clear plastic take-out box at self serve salad bars, or the lids on those tubs of cut up lettuce from the grocery store.

Put your canopy together. Support it firmly on something where the edges are exposed and raised from the base. If the canopy is truly a write off, glue it on the end of an upright stick or similar.

Take a piece of the clear plastic as large as possible. For instance, if your canopy is 1" x 1" x 1". a piece 6" x 6" would be about right.

Hold it over a candle flame and watch until the flatness just starts to change. It takes a couple of seconds. Then transfer to the mold and pull it down over and below the part.

This works pretty well, if it takes a couple of tries. Sometimes you can do a couple or more side by side on your piece of plastic.

This will be thin and does pick up all of the detail. As an example, if the canopy is cracked, the crack will show on the pulled part. That is fixed by putty and sanding befor molding.

  • Member since
    February, 2019
Posted by A1987 on Sunday, March 10, 2019 12:52 PM

this is the current state of affairs. actually looks worse than in real life. still much better than it was before a lot of tooth paste polish...might be salvageable?

http://imgur.com/gallery/zGCn8hD

  • Member since
    August, 2012
  • From: Parker City, IN.
Posted by Rambo on Sunday, March 10, 2019 1:46 PM
Wow that's bad get some micromesh 5000+grit and just keep at it.

Clint

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Sunday, March 10, 2019 2:24 PM

Tamiya will send you a replacement. It may take a couple of weeks but they have excellent customer service. I've received replacements from then on a couple of times.

Another option is Squadron vac formed canopies but I would just wait for Tamiya to respond. 

As for using glues on clear parts, only use either Testors Clear Parts Cement, Aleene's, or any brand designed to be used on clear parts otherwise fogging or even crazing will appear. 

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    February, 2019
Posted by A1987 on Sunday, March 10, 2019 2:24 PM

Yeah I am going to have to pick up some 5000 grit and probably some Tamiya compound it seems. It looks better to the eye than in those pictures but it is still very miserable and no amount of erzats polish is solving it. Or who knows, maybe Tamiya will come to my rescue with those parts?

 

 

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, March 11, 2019 8:31 AM

GMorrison

....

Take a piece of the clear plastic as large as possible. For instance, if your canopy is 1" x 1" x 1". a piece 6" x 6" would be about right.

Hold it over a candle flame and watch until the flatness just starts to change. It takes a couple of seconds. Then transfer to the mold and pull it down over and below the part.

....

 

A small heat gun is another way to heat the plastic.  There is a low power version of a hair dryer called a stamping iron. It is sold at craft stores like Michaels and HL.  It is a great tool to have to heat things that you don't want to get TOO hot.  They are not that expensive- in the 20-30 buck range before any discount coupon.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: USA
Posted by Striker8241 on Monday, March 11, 2019 10:09 AM

You might try dipping the canopy in Future. Wick off the excess and let it dry thoroughly, then buff it with a very fine grit sanding pad. If it begins to clear, repeat the process and use a finer grit pad.

Good luck,

Russ

 

  • Member since
    March, 2003
Posted by rangerj on Monday, March 11, 2019 11:29 AM

Look in the Squadron Models Catalog for A VACUUMED CANOPY FOR THAT MODEL.

  • Member since
    January, 2016
Posted by suomi39 on Monday, March 11, 2019 6:59 PM

Striker8241

You might try dipping the canopy in Future. Wick off the excess and let it dry thoroughly, then buff it with a very fine grit sanding pad. If it begins to clear, repeat the process and use a finer grit pad.

Good luck,

Russ

 

 
I second this -- Future does a great job of hiding lots of scratches, scuffs, misting, crazing, etc. of clear parts. It won't hurt anything to try. 

  • Member since
    June, 2013
Posted by bvallot on Monday, March 18, 2019 7:37 PM

You’ve already got a host of ideas to try out. I’m a fan of the Squadron canopy if you can find one. I didn’t come across any just now. As far as polishing and buffing goes, sometimes you just need the right compounds. I’ve used a Novus 3 part compound for polishing clear plastic parts with some luck. Tamiya has a new compound out that’s likely better. They’ve been adding some very nice things to a modelers tool box. I doubt you’ll get her back to perfect, but a good compound used properly may help you along. 

On the bench:  

Tamiya P-51D  William Shomo

Tamiya F4U-1  Kenneth Walsh

 

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