SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Tightening 20lb monofiliment

428 views
8 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    December 2010
  • From: Salem, Oregon
Tightening 20lb monofiliment
Posted by 1943Mike on Saturday, July 18, 2020 6:45 PM

Does anyone know if applying heat (tricky once the rigging is on the model) will work to tighten monofiliment that is already glued in place on a biplane? If yes, how much heat and from what source?

I have a hair dryer I've used for models before (unfortunately of no use for my bald pate Smile) but I'm worried that I might warp some areas on the model if a lot of heat is required to tighten the rigging. Somewhere I read about lighting a match, blowing it out and immediately putting it next to (but not touching) the rigging line ... does anyone know if that works?

The area to be tightened is between the wings on the engine of my 1/48 supermarine walrus. I've already chosen NOT to drill holes through both sides of each wing surface which would probably have been the most expeditious solution to the problem I'm trying to deal with. I also could have used EZLine which would have worked since I've already used some of it in a really difficult area to get to but I'm experimenting with monofiliment for the first time and want to use it for the bulk of my rigging.

Any suggestions, tips, techniques that have tightened up monofiliment on your models would be very much appreciated.

 

Mike

"Le temps est un grand maître, mais malheureusement, il tue tous ses élèves."

Hector Berlioz

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Sunday, July 19, 2020 6:09 AM

1943Mike
Does anyone know if applying heat (tricky once the rigging is on the model) will work to tighten monofiliment that is already glued in place on a biplane? If yes, how much heat and from what source?

Mike, I'd suggest caution. And...definitely...don't try it out for the first time on the actual model.

When I first started rigging biplanes with anything other than sewing thread...say, the early '70s...a neighbor who built told me about using fishing line. I just grabbed whatever was in dad's tackle box and went to town on Revell's old 1/28 Sopwith Camel. A little heat from a blown-out match, and the stuff --whatever it was -- snugged up as advertised and all was well. (Though I did discover later that seasonal changes in temp. and humidity would periodically make it go slack, then tighten up again.)

Tried the same thing a couple years ago with some kind of thin smoke-colored monofilament -- expecting the same result -- and was horrified to see that applying the heat only made the line go slack: it never reached that familiar point where it suddenly 'snaps' back, becoming taut (as, say, stretched sprue does.) I mentioned this to some modeling friends, and they seemed to think that was a pretty common result.

The upshot is that I suppose it has something to do with the chemistry of the line involved...those with more experience could probably tell the relevant materials in play...but it seems all monofilament is not created equal in heat-tightening terms. It would be easy enough to make a test-rig with something like a wire coat hanger and do some experimenting; it'll be pretty obvious pretty soon what works and what doesnt't.

(Personally, I took the easy way out, and went back to EZ-Line and stretched sprue. Big Smile)

Cheers

Greg

 George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Sunday, July 19, 2020 6:23 AM

1943Mike

Does anyone know if applying heat (tricky once the rigging is on the model) will work to tighten monofiliment that is already glued in place on a biplane? If yes, how much heat and from what source?

I have a hair dryer I've used for models before (unfortunately of no use for my bald pate Smile) but I'm worried that I might warp some areas on the model if a lot of heat is required to tighten the rigging. Somewhere I read about lighting a match, blowing it out and immediately putting it next to (but not touching) the rigging line ... does anyone know if that works?

...

Any suggestions, tips, techniques that have tightened up monofiliment on your models would be very much appreciated.

20 pound monofilament?  That's pretty stout.  2 pound tippet material may be a finer choice 

It will take more heat to move 20 lb material.   

As noted above, experiment.  Try a smaller pencil sized soldering iron as your heat source. Maneuver just the tip along the line (without touching). Experiment to determine the optimal distance to hold off

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, July 19, 2020 6:58 AM

There is a small heat gun available in craft stores called a stamping iron.  It puts out a lot less heat than a hair dryer or paint remover blower.  I got mine at Michaels, in the scrapbooking isles.

I use it for tightening rigging on model ships.  Yes, you can overheat models with it, but if you take quick passes, not holding iron aimed at model for any length of time you can build up the temp you need.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Sunday, July 19, 2020 11:56 AM

Hair drier will work fine, just be light and careful. All it takes is a tad of heat to shrink the line.

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    December 2010
  • From: Salem, Oregon
Posted by 1943Mike on Sunday, July 19, 2020 12:22 PM

Greg, Ed, Don, and plasticjunkie,

Thanks very much indeed for the helpful replys.

PJ,

I don't think I'll use my hair dryer as the air flow would be too dispersed in the section I want to get to. I may give it a try from a distance although I have my doubts as to whether or not that would produce any results. But, as others have suggested, I may experiment off model.

Ed,

Yep, it's really kind of thick for monofiliment. However, I do think it'll look OK if I can get it to stay taught.

I thank you for the suggestion to use my soldering gun. I'll experiment off model with that.

Don,

Thanks for the heads up regarding the small heat gun. I'll try to check it out at Michael's online. If I can't find it there I'll call their closest store to see whether or not they carry it there.

Greg,

Your admonitions are very much appreciated! I'll try to experiment off model for any of the suggestions I've received in this thread.

 

Mike

"Le temps est un grand maître, mais malheureusement, il tue tous ses élèves."

Hector Berlioz

  • Member since
    December 2003
  • From: 37deg 40.13' N 95deg 29.10'W
Posted by scottrc on Monday, July 27, 2020 10:18 AM

I heat up a some old flat file or flat blade with a tourch.  ANything with a handle for insulation.  With a small blade, you can move it into position and slowly increase or decrease the distance between the heat and the filiment based on the reaction.  Its easier to control and safer. 

  • Member since
    December 2010
  • From: Salem, Oregon
Posted by 1943Mike on Monday, July 27, 2020 1:14 PM

Thanks Scott,

I'm finding my soldering iron is working for me at the moment. I may still experiment down the line before building my next biplane.

Mike

"Le temps est un grand maître, mais malheureusement, il tue tous ses élèves."

Hector Berlioz

  • Member since
    December 2003
  • From: 37deg 40.13' N 95deg 29.10'W
Posted by scottrc on Monday, July 27, 2020 1:15 PM

Soldering iron with a flat tip works good.  An adjustble soldering iron is even better. 

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.