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Annoying glossy specks from airbursh?

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  • Member since
    November 2005
Annoying glossy specks from airbursh?
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, May 25, 2003 6:38 PM
Hi everyone, first post here. I have just gotten back into building airplanes after many years off. I am using a Badger 350 and am getting some aweful specks in my paint, wierd little glossy specks showing up in flat paint! Is this my mixture or something? I am mixing 1 part thinner to 3 parts paint. I am also using canned propellant. Any input would be much appreciated. Also, how do I get rid of the damn things? I can't seem to paint over them.
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Iowa- USA
Posted by toadwbg on Sunday, May 25, 2003 8:13 PM
Need more info Jafar:

What paint brand are you using?
What Thinner?
What color?
Is the paint old? How old?
How thouroughly are you mixing your paint and thinner?
Are you using a filter of any sort?

It could be your air source (moisture or dirt in your air causing problems). Canned propellant gets cold after rapid use ( remember the ideal gas law? PV=nRT). Your pressure goes down and you can get condensation in your lines.

The airbrush itself isn't likely the problem, unless it has not been properly cleaned from a previous use. Are you properly cleaning your Badger 350?

Questions, Questions.
"I love modeling- it keeps me in the cool, dark, and damp basement where I belong" Current Projects: 1/48th Hasegawa F-14D- 25% 1/48th Tamiya Spitfire- 25%
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, May 25, 2003 8:23 PM
Paint brand is Model Masters, same airbrush thinner. The color I'm currently using is Dark gull grey, however it did it with flat white as well. The paint is a couple of years old but the bottle had never been opened. I stirred the paint in its own bottle for a couple of minutes before pouring it in the airbrush bottle and mixed it again with the thinner. Just stirring for a couple of minutes. I am not using any filter.

As far as the propellant goes, it seems this happens more during first use rather than when the pressure drops. I may venture to say it seems to be related to high pressure, i.e. right after I put the propel can in water or something. (Or first use of a new can.)

Cleaning? Well I'm sure there are better ways than what I do. I spray thinner through the unit and then soak the paint touching components for a little while before rinsing them off.

thanks again
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Niagara Falls NY
Posted by Butz on Sunday, May 25, 2003 8:25 PM
Whaz up Jarfar,
Here could be a few reasons why
1. It sounds like you are not thoroughly cleaning your airbrush.
2. Do you have a regulator attached to your canned propellent?? You may be not getting a steady flow as needed(pulsating air flow)
3. Check the tip of your needle, it may be bent. Not visable to the eye but check under a magnifying glass.
Like I said this may be the causes.Hope this hepls ya out my friend
Flaps up,Mike

  If you would listen to everybody about the inaccuracies, most of the kits on your shelf would not have been built Too Close For Guns, Switching To Finger

  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Iowa- USA
Posted by toadwbg on Sunday, May 25, 2003 8:37 PM
Get a large cup that your propellant can can fit at least half inside of, fill that cup with warm tap water. This will act as a temperature bath and help keep the air pressure constant throughout use.

Butz is wise to reccomend inspecting your needle tip. Sounds like you need to clean your airbrush better too. I use cotton swabs (for cleaning out your ears) and pipe cleaners (found at the tobbacco counter) for cleaning mine. Dip them in thinner and scrub! Do this after every painting session.

Properly cleaning your airbrush is just (almost) as important as cleaning a firearm! We don't want any misfires!
"I love modeling- it keeps me in the cool, dark, and damp basement where I belong" Current Projects: 1/48th Hasegawa F-14D- 25% 1/48th Tamiya Spitfire- 25%
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Niagara Falls NY
Posted by Butz on Sunday, May 25, 2003 8:44 PM
THANK YOU toadwbg, at least I'm wise to somebody..Tongue [:P]Tongue [:P]Tongue [:P]
I think I just started somin[:0] OK Steve..........
Flaps up,Mike

  If you would listen to everybody about the inaccuracies, most of the kits on your shelf would not have been built Too Close For Guns, Switching To Finger

  • Member since
    February 2003
Posted by Anthony on Sunday, May 25, 2003 9:18 PM
I once used to have the similar problem occasionally. I was using Gunze Aqueous paint with Passche Airbrush and Testor propellant. I strongely believe the problem comes from the chemical in the propellant at high pressure. Because after I switch to compressor, the problem ceases. The first spray from the propellant may have a higher pressure (mixed with the chemical inside). So IMHO, you can try the the following:

1) If you plan to do modeling for a long run, try to switch to compressor.

2) If you have to use propellant can, DO NOT aim towards the kit directly for the first shot. Point at an area one inch or two off set to the kit(left or right), spray it and move along side to the kit. The first burst might be the problem.

Of course, cleaning the airblush well and warm water bath on propellant are must.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, May 25, 2003 9:42 PM
Thanks for the advice, everyone. I do use q-tips after I let the parts soak, but I do need to get some pipe cleaners.

I tend to agree with Anthony, I think it is the propel. Whatever the dots are, they aren't paint and they aren't thinner. So they're some kind of liquid coming out of the can. Trouble is, they seem to be worse when using the warm bath, so I wonder if the seals in the brush are going or something.

There is no doubt a compressor is the way to go. I intend to get one. A decent one isn't much more than a real nice Hassagawa airplane kit.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, May 26, 2003 6:09 AM
Some airbrushes have a problem with a build up of paint on the inside of the nozzle. I have a Badger 200 with an medium assembly and usually have to clean out the front end every 5 minutes or so with a Q tip soaked in alcohol(Tamiya/Gunze paints)
Badger now make a nozzle that eliminates this problem but I havn't been able to get my hands on one yet -I think I saw it in FSM about 2 years ago.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, May 27, 2003 9:10 PM
Well I know what the problem is. Crap is really coming through the brush from the propellant can. I sprayed for a little while with a completely clean, dry set up, no paint, not even a bottle attached, and sure enough little glossy specks came out! A lot. Could this be my brush going or something? It's a model 350 that is probably about 15 years old. So my F-22 project is on hold until I can buy a damn compressor and find out if my brush is shot. With the can hooked up if I put the brush up to my ear I can hear a faint sound of air leaking. Also, the liquid that comes out the end also leaks out of the push button.
  • Member since
    March 2003
Posted by rangerj on Saturday, May 31, 2003 5:36 PM
JAFAR,

Here are a couple of thoughts for you, before you buy a compressor. In 40+ years of modeling I have gone through at least six compressors. I have had several badgers, two HR Browns, and a couple of others.

About 10 years ago I started using a 20lb. CO2 tank with a regulator and a moisture trap. This set-up costs about $135 to $150 (US). I have several Badger, Binks, and Pashe airbrushes, both internal mix and external mix types.

The CO2 set up gives me excellent pressure control via the regulator, and excellent atomization of the paint with no ill effects. I get the tank refilled about once a year at a cost of about $20. This is about half of what my extra electicity cost were from running a compressor.

The advantage over most compressors is that the air flow is constant and not a "pulse" as are most compressors. Sure you can buy a compressor with a tank that will give you constant flow, but at what price? Then there is the noise and vibration issue. A good compressor with a resevoir tank, regulator, vibration damper, and silencer can cost from $300 to $1000 US.

If nothing else look into using a CO2 tank with a regulator. I find the 20lb. tank ideal for me. I tried a 10 lb tank and it did not last long enough. A 100 lb. tank is to cumbersome.

As I said when I started, these are just some thoughts about an excellent alternative to a compressor. rangerj
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