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Painting canopy frames

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  • Member since
    November 2005
Painting canopy frames
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, December 6, 2002 2:15 PM
Can anyone please tell me how to paint the frames on canopies so they look really sharpQuestion [?] I have a few unbuilt plane kits an I'm afraid to build them because on the ones I have put together in the past, the canopies always turn out looking like junk when I finish.
Thanks,
Pat
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, December 7, 2002 7:16 AM
I usually do the following:
- mask canopy using Tamiya tape
- seal it with clear gloss (in my case, MM metalizer sealer)
- paint
- lightly score edges of the masks with #10 (round) x-acto blade
- remove the mask

Here's the example of masks applied to He-219:
http://www.modelarstwo.org.pl/lotnicze/galeria/seanski/he-219/12.html
and here's the result:
http://www.modelarstwo.org.pl/lotnicze/galeria/seanski/he-219/03.html

HTH
SeanSki
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, December 7, 2002 9:20 AM
I use tamiya tape also, the way I found to score the tape along the framelines is to use a pencil and do a rubbing that way it highlights the lines better so they can be seen more easily, then after the framework is ready I spray the interior color then the exterior color.
hth
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, December 7, 2002 11:49 AM
Hi Pat,
I use Parafilm M, It's none adhesive and works well. Takes a bit of getting used to though, so if it's your first time masking canopies Tamiya masking tape is a good starting point. If the canopy frames are straight then cut small pieces of tape, using a straight edge, and fill in the window area. If the frames have angles or are curved then lay on a apiece of tape that covers the window area and the frame. Burnish the tape, particularly around the frame lines. Take a sharp (I always use new) No 11 scalpel blade or similar (pointy) and carefully run it around the frame lines. The sharper the blade the easier it is. If it's dificult to see the frame lines then hold the canopy up to a light source. Take your time and watch your fingers. Paint the interior colour first (this will be seen on the inside) then the exterior colour. after gloss coates and matt coates, score around the edges of the tape, to cut through the paint and varnish, and carefully remove the masking. With care you will get perfect, or near perfect results every time. Like all techniques I would advise practice, use some old canopies. An alternative to Tamiya tape is 3M. The advantage of 3M is that it has a matt surface that when you burnish it down turns clear, this enables you to see the frame lines easier.
Something else that you might want to consider is dipping your canopies in Klear, Future in the US, it makes them sparkle.
Hope this helps.Cool [8D]
Mal
P.S. Nice 219 SeanSkiWink [;)]
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Vallejo, CA
Posted by didfaI on Saturday, December 7, 2002 7:01 PM
A couple of years ago there was a canopy decal for frames. Haven't seen it advertised and I can't remember the name.
did it work and where can I find it if it did?
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Arizona
Posted by delov on Saturday, December 7, 2002 8:09 PM
The way I do the canopy frames is by applying liquid mask. First I dip the canopies in Future floor polish. When they are dry I thin the the liquid mask with water to airbrush consistency and spray the canopy with multiple coats, usually take the airbrush needle out. The thicker the film the easier it is to peel off later. When the liqud mask is dry cut the frames with #11 Exacto knife and you are good to go.

Good luck
Borislav
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, December 8, 2002 8:10 AM
Thanks to all of you who replied to my question. I think your techniques sound great and will really help me out.
Happy Modeling!
Pat
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, December 8, 2002 8:57 AM
Smile [:)] Of course you can always use Eduard or other canopy masks. Or paint decal film cut it into strips and apply to the frames.Cool [8D]
Mal
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, December 8, 2002 10:28 AM
Hi Pat,

In addition to the above mentioned techniques, you might try Black Magic Canopy and Wheel Hub Masks. These mask sets are designed for specific manufactuor's kits. They are available from Meteor Productions. Visit their website at: http://www.meteorprod.com Click on the Featured Products button, and it will take you to the Black Magic section.

Meteor carries Black Magic Mask Sets, Black Box Resin Cockpit Sets, Cutting Edge Decals, as well as an extensive line of after market accessories and finishing products.

Good Wishes And Good Modeling

John Carr (a.k.a. fuzz_09)
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, December 12, 2002 9:02 PM
I mask mine. You don't have to dip it in any floor polish. Just brush on the mask and score around the frame with a hobby knife, spray or paint, peel of the mask and you are good to go!

Good Luck!
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, December 14, 2002 4:31 AM
Your right M2A2Bradley, you don't have to dip the canopy in any floor polish to apply any mask but Klear will make it clear and sparkling. Try it you will be amazed. It is also possible to brush it on afterwards but if you dip it first the Klear will protect it from scratches as well.
Mal
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, December 27, 2002 12:56 PM
I have heard the term "seal the masking tape with clear gloss" before, but does that mean to make the first coat of paint clear over the whole thing, or something else?
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, December 29, 2002 11:09 PM
Spraying on a light coat of clear seals the edges of the tape and keeps your color coats from creeping under the tape, keeping the lines sharp and neat.
RJ
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: USA
Posted by RJ on Monday, December 30, 2002 8:41 AM
Check out my article on the subject, here:

http://209.133.73.62/TnT/0001-1000/001-100/021-030/TNT021_Cyrstal_Clear_Canopies/tnt021.htm

HTH!
RJ
  • Member since
    December 2002
Posted by billc3207 on Friday, January 3, 2003 1:11 PM
I have tried all of the techniques mentioned above but the one that works the best for me is to mask with Bare Metal Foil. I cover the entire canopy then lightly rub the foil with a cotton swab to seal it. I cut around the frame lines with a new Exacto blade the peal off the excess. There will be a little adhesive from the foil put Scotch tape applied to the areas to be painted will lift the adhesive. I wrap it around a tooth pick to limit the area it touches. If you pull up the foil you can rub it back down. Paint your canopy with the inside color followed with the outside color. Follow this with a sealer coat such as Testor's Dullcoat. As soon as you are done and the canopy is dry, peal off the remaining foil. I use a clean tooth pick to lift the corners. Be careful to keep from scratching the canopy. You will need to remove the adhesive on the clear areas but that is easier now since you don't have to work around the foil. Also the dried paint won't come off since you have sealed it. Your lines will be razor sharp with no bleeding. I have never tried dipping the canopy in Future before starting but that may make removal of the foil easier. Try it on an old scrap canopy and let us know if that works.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, January 4, 2003 10:25 PM
Well, believe it or not, i actually have always done my canopies the "hard" way, i.e., painted on with a tooth pick. I have had a modicum of success with this method though i wouldn't presume to suggest it over the other options. I'm just throwing it out there as an alternative. I suppose it might be okay if you're not doing a B-29 or something like that. The only reason i did it this way was cause way back when i started model building, there wasn't the help there is today. Still, it has worked for me in the past and as i said if if there's not too many lines to paint it makes things less complicated and still gets the job done; a staedy hand is alls that's needed!
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: USA
Posted by weebles on Tuesday, January 14, 2003 8:40 AM
I like the Bare Metal Foil method as well. But do this first. Give your canopy a coat of Future Floor Wax first. It dries clear and even. Then apply the bare metal foil. Burnish it and score around the canopy with a number 11hobby knife. Remove any extra material. Paint your canopy and remove the bare metal foil carefully as described in another post. Paul Boyer from FSM gave me this tip and it works great. Give it a go.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, January 15, 2003 12:04 AM
After I polish a canopy, I always put a couple of coats of Future on them before I paint the frames. I also use Parafilm to mask my canopies. It's easier and faster than the old toothpick. Wink [;)]
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, January 21, 2003 3:52 AM
if you want to get a sharp finish paint a blank decal sheet the colour that it needs to be then cut strips of the decal sheet and apply them to the canopy.

it looks really sharp and is a safe mess free way to do it!
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Upper left side of the lower Penninsula of Mich
Posted by dkmacin on Thursday, January 23, 2003 8:22 PM
I agree with Rex.
But I use a clear decal film, I put down a coat of the interior color first, then the exterior color. A coat of clear over all and cut to fit. That way the interior color shows through and looks more like a frame and not a decal. If you are not going to have your canopy open you could just go with the exterior color.
I know it's only rock and roll, but I like it.
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by James Mark on Friday, January 24, 2003 11:25 PM
I do bare metal foil myself I have always had good crisp lines (even without sealing) I also paint the interiour color first, to get the interior looking right, but lately I Have wondered...do the pro's ever actually mask and paint the interior of the canopy? I swear I have seen pictures where the interior of the canopy did not have the characteristic sheen but actually matched the interior color!

Does anyone have any advice on painting the interior of a canopy? How do you mask? I was thinking of doing this on my next model..so any advice would be appreciated!

James
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, January 26, 2003 11:56 AM
I think the easiest way to get color on the inside without painting the interior color first on the outside would be to cut strips of pre-painted decal and apply to the inside like someone else mentioned.

Mark
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Central Ohio
Posted by Ashley on Saturday, February 1, 2003 3:20 PM
If it is a birdcage type canopy, as on the Zero or T-6, I've had good success lately with painted household foil. I burnish the foil on both sides with a Scotchbrite pad to roughen it, then prime it with zinc chromate, which you can now get at the hardware store in spray cans. I paint one side the interior color and the other side the exterior with thinned artists oils. You gotta let that dry a week, but it remains flexible for quite some time after it is dry. Then, cut strips with a straightedge and NEW razor blade, and apply them with foil adhesive.

Have you flown a Ford lately?

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