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F9F-5 wheel well color

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  • Member since
    October 2006
  • From: Richmond, Texas
F9F-5 wheel well color
Posted by Flyingcoach2 on Thursday, March 8, 2007 9:10 PM

I am in the process of building a F9F-5 Panther for a friend.  He used to fly one back in the day.  However in my research i can not find the color of the wheel wells.  The directions state gloss sea blue, but my little voice keeps telling me thats wrong.  Anybody got suggestions??  Thanks!!

 

 

John Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
  • Member since
    November 2004
  • From: Columbia Gorge
Posted by brain44 on Friday, March 9, 2007 10:33 AM

John,

When I researched my build, the precious few color pics I could find indictated an interior chromate green color, so that is what I used on mine, hope this helps!

Brian  Cowboy [C):-)]

"I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I expect the same from them." John Bernard Books (The Shootist)
  • Member since
    December 2002
Posted by tyamada on Friday, March 9, 2007 10:47 AM

Try this link: http://www.primeportal.net/hangar/howard_mason/f9f-5_125295/

Page 2 and 3 have wheel wells.

  • Member since
    October 2006
  • From: Richmond, Texas
Posted by Flyingcoach2 on Friday, March 9, 2007 4:45 PM
Thanks for the help there Brian and Tyamada.  That helped tremendously!! Smile [:)]
John Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
  • Member since
    December 2015
Posted by Boyington on Thursday, December 17, 2015 8:07 PM

Actually it pays to have family that was in the business. Grandpa was a Vought Corsair mechanic and Uncle Eddy was a grumman mechanic on Boxer and Princeton.  The wheel well colors prior to 1955 went like this.  If the  jet/plane was depoted, the wheels wells were generally midnight blue.  Because the paint was a lead base at the time, it did not adhere to aluminum well. Within six weeks at sea the planes up on deck would start to peel. Depending on the amount of corrosion the wells would be stripped back to bare and then a green chromate would be applied.  If time was available,and 48 hours of drying time occurred, then the jet was painted blue in these areas. Off of korea there was almost no drying time before the jet was back on the deck so green would be okay.  Actually they used the same olive drab that the bombs and other equipment was painted as that was already to go in one gallon cans. Unpainted and the aluiminum would "salt" and corrode within five days with the mist and fog of winter operations off Korea.  So the answer goes back to pictures and referneces of the subject.  Navy/Marine protocals required Midnight Blue but field/deck work could get the green chromate color instead.  The same went for hydraulic/fuel leaks as they took the paint off to bare aluminum also. Then back to what was available and how fast can you get it done.

  • Member since
    November 2004
  • From: Cat Central, NC
Posted by Bronto on Friday, December 18, 2015 6:46 PM

You did notice that you answered an almost 9 year old post?

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Saturday, December 19, 2015 4:47 AM

Hello!

I don't care how old this thread is - the aircraft mentioned are even older, and the info is just great! Thanks a lot, Boyington, for your time and for a very valuable info. Have a nice day

PaweĊ‚

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    January 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Sunday, December 20, 2015 12:50 PM

Bronto

You did notice that you answered an almost 9 year old post?

 

IT'S ALIVE !!!!

  • Member since
    February 2020
Posted by PhilliePhan79 on Saturday, May 23, 2020 8:08 AM

Bronto

You did notice that you answered an almost 9 year old post?

 

 

And 5 years after your post his answer was of great service to me.  

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, May 23, 2020 9:59 AM

I'd never seen that info before. Timely as I'm working on a USS Midway circa 1952 right now.

Wheel wells in 1/540?

Sure.

Modeling is an excuse to buy books

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Saturday, May 23, 2020 10:52 AM

PhilliePhan79

 

 
Bronto

You did notice that you answered an almost 9 year old post?

 

 

 

 

And 5 years after your post his answer was of great service to me.  

 

With the terrible site search engine, I’m amazed that anybody intentionally found this post. I can see it turning up by off site google search...

But yes this information is quite useful. I still have a F9F-5P in my stash to build...

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Sunday, May 24, 2020 6:37 PM

Hmm, wonder how a person would render the overspary shown in the photos? [ducks and runs for cover Smile)

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