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how do you make those things so real?!?!

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  • Member since
    November, 2005
how do you make those things so real?!?!
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, February 24, 2003 1:15 PM
Shy [8)]hi! im 16 years old and im just starting to learn how to make those models look very real.. but whatever i do... it looks very cartoonyDisapprove [V]. what do you think i should learn? what should i need? what are your techniques? I need help from you guys because no one in the family has the same habbie as i do.Big Smile [:D]
  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, February 24, 2003 3:05 PM
im 17 and my vehicles look realistic but not all my figures come out the way they should it took me a while to learn how to build them...the best advice i can give is take your time, sand all abrasions down neatly and paint evenly (or use an airbrush but that takes practice) if u have questions or not sure what to do post it up here these guys are very helpfull they got me started
  • Member since
    January, 2003
Posted by shermanfreak on Monday, February 24, 2003 4:07 PM
Hi and welcome sundalo.
As with anything..it takes a little knowledge and a lot of practice to make something look right. A good start on your knowledge base is right here at FSM read some of the articles, ask questions....lots of questions and then practice these techniques until you are happy with the end result. The key thing though is to make yourself happy with this hobby...not others. Build to the level that you are most comfortable at.
Happy Modelling and God Bless Robert
  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, February 26, 2003 7:59 PM
Greetings Sundalo. Just like Shermanfreak said, take your time. You can't expect it to look like some of the real experts models right off the bat. I've been building for almost 5 years now, and there is still alot I need to learn. I recommend you do like Sherman said, and read the articles. Go to your local hobby shop and get a couple of magaines and books on modeling. Then find a technique that you would like to try and work at that until you feel comfortable with it and are happy with your results. Then go on to the next one. Again, it will take time, but it is all worth it once you finish your kit. I hope this inspires you just a little bit. You'll need all your inspiration for your next model. Enjoy modeling and keep it going, each one is always a little better than the last. You'll see. Chris.
  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, February 26, 2003 8:13 PM
sundalo

Some techniques i like are dry brusing and washing. There are some great books on building models and these techniques and others are explained in these books. My favorite place to buy from is squadron.com. Any of the "how to build" diorama books are great.

I can remenber when I made the wash and dry brush discovery . My model satisfaction increased 10 fold just with dry brushing and washing!
  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, February 27, 2003 8:39 PM
im 13 and a pretty good modeler. ive won the imps/atlanta, the ipms/usa, and the hobbytown usa national contest. i have started to use several methods that look good. first, i use a burnt sienna wash (black looks like crap) i got wery good with pastels, and a started to use aftermarket help. it makes a huge difference. i was faced with your problem about 1 year ago. it just looked fake! i prabably know why. your at your hobby store and you are lookin at tanks. you see a 40$ tamiya kit and a 12$ tamiya kit. its 12$ for a reason. it came out in the 70's and has no detail.
  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, February 28, 2003 12:17 PM
Sundalo,
Practice your techniques one at a time on smaller easier to build models then put those techniques on a larger model.

eg. buy a few 1/72 scale tanks. use one to practice dry brushing, the next to practice washing, one for pastels, schrachbuild on one, etc. etc.

This will teach you how each technique effects a model and how to better combine them onto one for realistic results.
  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, February 28, 2003 5:43 PM
Im 14 and mine are coming out alrigh, especially the figures. Give it time and u will learn. Thats how I learned. 7 years of trial and error
  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: USA
Posted by jcarlberg on Saturday, March 01, 2003 8:45 AM
One of the neat things about this hobby is that you never stop learning. I've been building more than 40 years, and there is still a lot I don't know about techniques, and new techniques and materials coming out all the time.
  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Newport News VA
Posted by Buddho on Sunday, March 02, 2003 8:31 AM
I have been building for 30 years now and continue to learn new techniques and enjoy modelbuilding very much. My career is in modelmaking as well, so I get plenty of experience all around! Just have fun with what you are doing and enjoy each one that you do.

  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, March 03, 2003 5:54 PM
geee..
thanks guys! i never knew i could get that much help here...
  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, March 04, 2003 10:18 AM
Practice,and more practice!!!I Got back into the hobby about 4 years ago,and still have ALOT to learn!The way I set the goal for a project is this:Make it better than the last one,The next one will be better than the one before.Keep at it dude!you'll get there!
  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, March 04, 2003 11:21 AM
Two things come to ming:
1. Subtle is better than 'in-your-face'. Consider dry-brushing for instance. It's probably more 'realistic' to dry brush your model in a lighter shade of the base coat than 'silver'. My suggestion is to always do things with subtlety first, and then increase the effect until you get what you want. Going 'too much' right at the start gives lots of 'impact', but rarely is 'realistic.
2. Practice your techniques one or two at a time. Another poster suggested getting some smaller models to practice on. I agree with this and am currently doing this myself. I'll get a small (1/72) common armor kit that is relatively simple to assemble, and then I practice my weathering/painting skiills on it. In the end I get a pretty good little model that goes on my shelf, but I don't feel too bad if it's not 'perfect'.

Nice to see the younger guys in the hobby. Stay with it!!

M.
  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, March 05, 2003 1:13 PM
Like in baseball...fundamentals, fundamentals, fundamentals.

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