SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

French Armor 1940

1996 views
15 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
French Armor 1940
Posted by stikpusher on Tuesday, July 16, 2013 10:34 PM

More color photos from Life/Hugo Jaeger. I wish that I had found these a couple years ago during the Battle of France GB...

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: NYC, USA
Posted by waikong on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 10:56 AM

nice! thanks for posting them.

My website: http://waihobbies.wkhc.net

   

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Texas
Posted by wbill76 on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 8:27 PM

Very cool! The second to last photo shows a vehicle type I'm not familiar with, what are those?

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 9:04 PM

I have no idea... it is not the Renault, Hotchkiss, or Somua tanks that I am familiar with from the models...

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    May 2005
Posted by pyrman64 on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 9:29 PM

The tank in question is the Renault AMC-35 (en.wikipedia.org/.../AMC-35) 100 were built with 12 going to the Belgian Army.

Greg H

"There is many a boy here today who looks on war as all glory, but, boys, it is all hell." Gen. Wm T. Sherman (11 April 1880, Columbus, Ohio)

  • Member since
    December 2008
  • From: Goffstown, NH
Posted by New Hampshire on Thursday, July 18, 2013 6:00 AM

That third picture is catching my eye.  Shows a nice case of more "earthy" weathering!  I appreciate these series of photos you have been finding as I never think to scan through Life images.  You are doing us all a service. Big SmileYes

  • Member since
    March 2013
  • From: Puebla, Mexico
Posted by garzonh on Thursday, July 18, 2013 7:22 AM

WOW!

Analog photography is far better than digital.

Even that these pictures are 70 year old pictures!!, the colors look rich and warm.

Also would like to point out that you can see in the first 3 pictures that "weathering" is overused today.

They all look fairly new and clean, just some dust...nothing over damaged, rusted, pale colors as we all try to replicate.

Maybe because France just surrender without giving too much fight.

Anyway, great pictures, where did you found them?, please provide the link.

  • Member since
    March 2013
  • From: Puebla, Mexico
Posted by garzonh on Thursday, July 18, 2013 7:25 AM

Ohh. found the link.

Here are more great photos!!,

life.time.com/.../world-war-ii-in-color-the-italian-campaign-1944

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Thursday, July 18, 2013 8:54 AM

Yeah thanks SP for posting these! I too found the camo on the Renault AMC-35 interesting, for Tigerman's Blitz Build I did the black camo lines on my Char B1 with a hard edge but these look soft. Oh well, I'm not going back to repaint her now.

Looked around and there doesn't seem to any 1/35th model of this AFV even in resin, it's a neat looking tank, hopefully someday someone will come out with a kit.

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Thursday, July 18, 2013 10:32 AM

Guys, I love sharing finds like this. They certainly help to make our reference points more defined.

Pyr, thanks for the ID. Perhaps Heller will mold that tank one day to add to their stable of WWII French tanks. Or perhaps Trumpeter or Bronco, who both seem to cover obscure subjects of this type.

NH, yes, that sort of weathering is the reality of Central Europe- mud and dust in varying degrees, depending upon the season and area. But on a short sharp campaign like this one was, no time for chipping, fading, and rust is really not an issue- and that is a whole long discussion thread there...

Garzon, the photos are beautiful indeed! As a one time student of photography, I am always amazed by things like this that truly bring the past to life. There is also the Life/Google link that I posted elsewhere that is more searchable to stumble across these things. I can spend whole evenings lost in there.

Gamera, if you look closely on the B1 above, you can see under the dust and mud a faint hard edge pattern- looks like dark green and dark brown with a black demarcation line. The Hotchkis tank looks to be a soft edge pattern under the dirt.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Texas
Posted by wbill76 on Thursday, July 18, 2013 8:48 PM

Thanks for the answer! Definitely has an odd-ball look to them that caught my eye. Never say never when it comes to the possibility of them making it into kit form one day. Wink

  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Mexico
Posted by rtvmodeler on Tuesday, July 23, 2013 12:38 PM

Smile Thanks for the excellent pics!

 

Regards!
Rodolfo

Current Project:

Figures from Dragon, "German 6th Army, Stalingrad 1942-1943", 1/35

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Friday, August 7, 2020 11:00 PM

Found another one that I missed the first time around

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    February 2011
  • From: AZ,USA
Posted by GreySnake on Monday, August 10, 2020 11:57 AM
Thanks for posting the new photo otherwise I wouldn’t have seen the other ones from seven years ago. I have a Tamiya Char B1 that’s built that I’m going to redo someday and the color photo gives me some ideas for weathering.

 
  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Monday, August 10, 2020 4:07 PM

I'm glad that you like them Grey. I went and dig up this thread for some colors reference on a Somua that I'm working on right now.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Monday, August 10, 2020 6:06 PM

Color (or colour Smile) photography in the day was a tricky and precice thing.

You had to hit developer temperatures to the nearest degreen (e.g. ±0.5ºF) and the immersion and pause times had t obe accurate to almost the second.

The colors were very tightly bound to the filmstock (often nitrocellulose, aka celluloid) and the film stock was fixed and processed to a known spectral standard as well.

Which was very important for color printing in the day, as you wanted very prcise color rendition to pull four-color masking used in offset printing.

The archive of Life (magazine) photos is pretty snazzy, too.  Some of the source material is direct scanned from preserved archival material which has been kept light-safe and in an acid-free environment for the last 70+ years.  Some are direct prints of old neagatives (which are usually compared to the magazine cut sheets).

Modern color film is a blurry, sloppy thing by comparison (unless you pay extra for the good stuff and pay for it to be professionally processed).  We are only begging to see 14mP CCD imagery get close to the old Ektachrome standards.

That being said, some images are changed by the stock used.  Ektachrome produces brilliant blues with crisp definition (it's still the preferred slide stock, not that anyone shoots lides anymore).  But, take a picture at sea, and everything is  hue of blue.  Kodachrome is warmer and richer, and really renderd indoor themes, and green or tan scenes superbly.
If those photos are reproduced without a proper color correction, the images can really be off.

Life magazine really committed to making their images as "true to life" as possible, and the archives show it.

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS
FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.