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Pershing Guided Missile System 3/3/14 painted the Launch Pad OD

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  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Berkshires, MA
Pershing Guided Missile System 3/3/14 painted the Launch Pad OD
Posted by Foxer on Thursday, January 16, 2014 2:15 PM

I recently acquired a Topping model of the Pershing 1 Missile and Erector - Launcher 1n 1/32 scale. I was a Pershing Missile Erector - Launcher Operator in A Battery, 3/84 Artillery In Neckarsum, Germany in 1967-68. I've always wanted to model my Army "gun" and this will give it to me. I have modeled an M474 vehicle which carried the missile and associated equipment.

First, some background on the Pershing 1 ...

 The Pershing is the U. S. Army's longest range field artillery guided missile. In 1958, after the development of the first generation of missiles,  which included the Redstone missile system, the Army determined that sufficient advances had been , made in missile technology to warrant the development of a completely new missile system to replace the Redstone. This new system, named in honor of General John J. Pershing and developed with the Martin Company as the prime contractor, utilizes many "state of the art" advances which provide greatly increased mobility and range and allow a significant reduction in size, weight and reaction time. Other outstanding improvements include ground support equipment designed for maximum tactical and strategic mobility, electronic computation of firing data, and automatic test and checkout equipment. The Pershing system also includes a specially designed communication set which is unique within the artillery and allows extremely  reliable communications over great distances (99.9 percent reliability at 160 kilometers). The Pershing is normally deployed in general support of a field Army.

 CHARACTERISTICS

 a. The Pershing field artillery ballistic missile has the following technical characteristics:

 (1) Length --34.8 feet (10.38 meters).

 (2) Diameter--40 inches (1. 02 meters).

 (3) Weight--IO, 275 pounds.

 (4) Range--185-740 kilometers. .

 (5) Propulsion--solid propellant, two-stage.

 ( 6) Guidance - - inertial.

 (7) Warhead- -nuclear.

 b. Tactical characteristics of the Pershing are as follows:

 (1) The system is mounted on tracked vehicles.

 (2) All elements are transportable by phase II aircraft.

 (3)  All elements necessary for firing are transportable by helicopter.

  (4)  The guidance system and firing system are immune to electronic countermeasures.

 (5) The communication system allows separation up to 160 kilometers between the battery and the battalion headquarters.

GROUND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT

 The Pershing system is designed to achieve minimum reaction time with maximum mobility and reliability. Mobility is provided the firing battery by mounting all Pershing-peculiar equipment, including Communication equipment, on tracked vehicles, designated the XM474E2 missile equipment carrier. The XM474E2 is a modification of the Mll3 armored personnel carrier and is specifically designed to transport the Pershing system. Mounting kits permit interchange of any of the four
Pershing loads from vehicle to vehicle without modification of the basic vehicle structure. The XM474E2 is lightweight and unarmored. It is capable of speeds up to 35 miles per hour and has a cruising range of 320 kilometers. It can travel in swamps and streams to a depth of 1. 3 meters and climb 60 percent inclines. It is powered by a 215-horsepower, V8 engine.

 a. Warhead Vehicle. One XM474E2 carries the warhead section, two chests containing the azimuth laying equipment, and a container carrying the missile air fins. This vehicle also mounts a collapsible davit assembly which is used to mate the warhead section to the missile at the firing position.

Mike

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Berkshires, MA
Posted by Foxer on Thursday, January 16, 2014 2:17 PM

b. The Erector-Launcher.

(1) The erector-launcher is normally transported on an XM474E2 tracked vehicle; however, it may be transported by helicopter. The erector-launcher performs the following functions:

(a) Serves as a platform for assembly of the missile body sections.

(b) Supports the assembled missile, less warhead section, during transit on the XM474E2 carrier.

(c) Provides a platform for warhead mating to the missile body section, for horizontal test and checkout of the missile, and for azimuth laying operations while the

missile is horizontal. (d) Erects the missile and, if necessary, recaptures it and returns it to a horizontal position.

(e) Rotates the missile to the heading of the guidance platform after erection.

(f) Delivers electrical power, conditioned air, high-pressure air, test and checkout signals, and control signals to the missile through the cable mast.

(g) Provides a level, stable platform for firing the missile.

(2) The erector-launcher has four major assemblies: the transporter, the erector, the launcher, and the cable mast.

(a) Transporter. The transporter is a four-wheeled, trailer- type vehicle that can be towed or can be carried on the XM474E2 carrier. The erector and the launcher are

mounted on the transporter. The transporter furnishes electrical and mechanical control for erector and launcher functions. During the firing sequence, signals

from the programmer test station control the functions of the erector-launcher. Hand cranks can be used to manually operate equipment on the transporter when power is not available or for maintenance purposes.

(b) Erector. The erector supports the missile during assembly operations, during travel while assembled (less the warhead section), during test and checkout in the horizon-

tal position, and during erection or lowering. Ramps along the side s of the erector boom support the body section trucks and provide a working platform for personnel

during assembly operations. The erector is raised or lowered by actuators mounted on the transporter.

(c) Launcher. After the missile is erected and the erector is lowered, the launcher supports the missile and rotates it to the firing azimuth. A blast deflector under the launcher deflects the missile exhaust away from the erector-launcher. The launcher is leveled by automatically operated jacks; however, the launcher can al so be leveled manually when necessary.

(d) Cable mast. With the exception of the cable connected to the missile tail plug, all connections to the missile during the prefiring sequence are made through the cable mast. Cables conduct guidance and burst selection signals to the missile, test and checkout signals to and from the missile, and electrical power to the missile until its own power system is energized. Conditioned air and high-pressure air are routed through air hoses. The cable mast is automatically separated from the missile an instant before ignition of the first- stage motor section.

c. Programmer- Test Station and Power Station Vehicle. A third XM474E2  carries the programmer test station and power station.

 

(1) Power station. The power station (PS) produces both electrical and pneumatic outputs for the Pershing system. The electrical outputs are DC and AC power. The pneumatic outputs are high pressure air and conditioned air. The power outputs are used at the firing position to operate the missile and its ground support equipment and at the battery assembly area to test the.

 

 

system equipment. The power station can operate approximately 2 hours with a full tank of fuel.

 

(2) Programmer test station. The Pershing's fast reaction time is made possible to a great extent by the automatic features incorporated in the programmer test station (PTS). The PTS contains completely automatic, transistorized, self-verifying equipment with a malfunction detection and isolation capability. The purpose of the PTS is to determine whether the missile is flight worthy, to compute the firing data, and to insert the required presets into the missile and energize it for flight. Within the PTS are three functional groups of equipment- -the fire data computer, the peripheral equipment, and the test and checkout equipment. The operator's console provides countdown control and monitoring as well as control and monitoring
of the fire data computer.

Mike

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Berkshires, MA
Posted by Foxer on Thursday, January 16, 2014 2:21 PM

Following are drawings of the firing of a Pershing 1 Missile ...

Mike

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Thursday, January 16, 2014 2:23 PM

Hello!

Great info on the misille! They used to scare us with them in the Polish news when I was a kid - in the eighties. Good luck with your projects and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Berkshires, MA
Posted by Foxer on Thursday, January 16, 2014 2:40 PM

"Great info on the misilie! They used to scare us with them in the Polish news when I was a kid - in the eighties. Good luck with your projects and have a nice day

Paweł"

Ack ... but that was the intention, I suppose. The Pershings were instrumental in removing the Russian Nuclear Missiles (and Pershings) from Europe.

Good to hear from you and thanks for the comments.

Mike

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Thursday, January 16, 2014 7:40 PM

Nice stuff Foxer....love the information. It looks like the missiles and the launcher came from Martin Marritta. The missiles look exactly like the missiles from the kit I used. Where did you get your missiles??

Rounds Complete!!

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Berkshires, MA
Posted by Foxer on Thursday, January 16, 2014 9:31 PM

"It looks like the missiles and the launcher came from Martin Marritta. The missiles look exactly like the missiles from the kit I used. Where did you get your missiles??"

Martin Marietta was the prime contractor that developed the Pershing. The 1A on wheeled vehicles that you did was still the same missile with updated ground equipment. I never saw why they got rid of the tracked vehicles, but the wheels gave better mobility on roads where most of the movement took place anyway. I've seen video's of the 1A being erected and have to say it flies to vertical compared to the 1 that I worked on!

The kit I have was released by Topping, but it was developed by Martin Marietta, as was the one you did. I found the kit on ebay.

Mike

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Friday, January 17, 2014 1:42 AM

Foxer - in the end it all ended well - no nuclear tipped launches, that's always good. As for the fins - I'd say don't cast them, I'd recommend building them out of sheet styrene - easier to glue and probably faster to do. I see you have a lot of scratchbuilding to do, I like the idea. Good luck with your project and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Berkshires, MA
Posted by Foxer on Sunday, January 19, 2014 9:05 AM

Mike

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Sunday, January 19, 2014 8:10 PM

Looking good....keep it coming

Rounds Complete!!

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Berkshires, MA
Posted by Foxer on Sunday, January 26, 2014 8:46 AM

Slowly, but surely ...  I've been working on making the missing blast deflector under the launch pad. Some sheet cut to shape and ten I-beams wrap around front to back. The beams on the underside are in place but I need a trip the my LHS to get some small Channels for along the edges. Then 20 short beams for the edges. There are some shots of the deflector in the photos posted already.

Mike

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Monday, January 27, 2014 7:46 PM

Looks outstanding. Great scratch work

Rounds Complete!!

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

  • Member since
    June, 2005
  • From: Massachusetts
Posted by minimortar on Wednesday, January 29, 2014 6:29 AM

As a former member of the 56th FA Bde. (on the grunt side of the fence), I'll be checking in on this build. Altho during my time '72-'74, they were truck/trailer mounted, the tracked version had always fascinated me but never got to see it.

Looking great so far!

Thanks,
Kevin Keefe

Mortars in Miniature
A Scale Model (Plus!) Collection of the Infantryman's Artillery

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Wednesday, January 29, 2014 8:27 AM

Hello!

That deflector looks like a complicated part - good luck with it! Have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    December, 2013
Posted by jetmaker on Wednesday, January 29, 2014 8:45 AM

This is gonna be wicked when it's done!

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Berkshires, MA
Posted by Foxer on Wednesday, January 29, 2014 9:44 AM

Thanks for the comments ... and good to see some Pershing people watching here! :)

Still working on the blast deflector ... there's gonna be a lot of pieces here and it's starting to get a bit tedious. I have to scrap all the cuts with the knife and sandpaper to clean up the saw cuts. Here's a shot as I'm gluing the ends of the I-beams on ...

Mike

  • Member since
    August, 2007
  • From: back country of SO-CAL, at the birth place of Naval Aviation
Posted by DUSTER on Thursday, January 30, 2014 10:10 AM

See? aren't you glad you took up modeling a subject you know so much about- all those missing details the the rest of  us wouldnt know about - You  get to create! 

ps Great job! it looks very good.

Steve

Building the perfect model---just not quite yet  Confused

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Berkshires, MA
Posted by Foxer on Friday, January 31, 2014 10:05 AM

"See? aren't you glad you took up modeling a subject you know so much about- all those missing details the the rest of  us wouldnt know about - You  get to create! "

ahaha ... you GOT me! Over detailing is the bane to my modeling .. why I never seem to finish anything! Tongue Tied

Mike

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Berkshires, MA
Posted by Foxer on Friday, January 31, 2014 11:09 AM

Keeping up with what I last posted I "had" to notch these braces to fit properly as structural pieces should! ( I AM a Structural Engineer). These are about the last pieces to be mounted for the blast deflector, so I feel like I'm making progress! :)

Mike

  • Member since
    August, 2007
  • From: back country of SO-CAL, at the birth place of Naval Aviation
Posted by DUSTER on Friday, January 31, 2014 4:02 PM

 all kidding aside

Steve

Building the perfect model---just not quite yet  Confused

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Berkshires, MA
Posted by Foxer on Monday, March 03, 2014 10:15 AM

Things have been getting in the way but the launch pad got a coat of OD for evaluation in other than white styrene! I'm happy with how it's shaping up. There's lots little items and mounting tabs to go on the pad .. mostly to attack the rear jack.  I'm going to have to build the jacks from brass tube so they extend correctly. The extension tubes are molded into the modeled jacks. Only thing I'm concerned about is soldering the brass couplings as I never had much soldering luck and have never tried it on a model. I'm considering buying a resistance solderer but most of the prices for good ones are tooo high for the limited use I'll have. Maybe a lower wattage unit will suffice for what I need.

The tires I'm considering using are in these photos. They are from a Mini Cooper kit (!) but are the correct OD. The wheel is a bit large and the tread needs sanding to smooth and round out to resemble aircraft tires but I've found nothing else to use. Only two are mounted on the Launcher when mounted to the Tracked carrier so these should work close enough ... for Government work  .. Big Smile

Mike

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Monday, March 03, 2014 12:59 PM

Hello!

Nice progress! Good to see you back on track - good luck with your project and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    August, 2007
  • From: back country of SO-CAL, at the birth place of Naval Aviation
Posted by DUSTER on Monday, March 03, 2014 5:33 PM

Spectacular Mike 

Looks great and sounds like you plan to use brass will  pay off in accuracy for your self.

Re: as a "non solder-er"  myself, I feel your trepidation.  A few test pieces, should give you the feel for soldering  in short order.   use flux,  read,reread soldering posts  and if practical, you can glue brass with CA 

Steve

Building the perfect model---just not quite yet  Confused

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Monday, March 03, 2014 6:34 PM

Looking good. I am sure once you work on the tires a bit they will fit in much better. The scratch work on the launch stand looks great.

Rounds Complete!!

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

  • Member since
    March, 2014
Posted by motor pool sergeant on Monday, March 31, 2014 8:09 AM

Mike - I served in the same unit and worked in the motor pool.  I achieved the rank of sergeant during my 3 years in the Army.  However, I was stationed at Badenerhof Kaserne from March of '71 until October of '73.  Do you remember the times we spent at Redleg or Kleingartach - or even Graf?  I would love to obtain a completed model or kit of a 1A including the EL and the 757 tractor, since I used to drive and repair the tractors, and the trailers.  Do you or anyone else know where I might be able to locate what I'm looking for?  Thanks, Mike

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Berkshires, MA
Posted by Foxer on Tuesday, April 01, 2014 3:44 PM

Redleg wasn't in existence when I was there .. think they were done for the 1A's .. a different launch plan than the 1's. There are models of the 1A's .. member redleg12 did one ..  this is his page to the build  but there's no photos there now. He might see this and give you some info in model.

Mike

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: New Jersey
Posted by redleg12 on Wednesday, April 02, 2014 5:51 AM

Motor Pool SGT & Foxer - The model of the Pershing 1A is a rare 1/32 kit actually made by Martin Marritta, the actual missile manufacturer, for the plant employees. I see one on Ebay about once a year or so. If you looking for a built display, you can find models made from wood for desktops. These were also made for Martin Marritta. Again you will find these on Ebay.

You can see photos of my build of the Pershing 1A on my web site here

http://www.redleg2scale.com/model%20gallery/M757.html

HTH

Rounds Complete!!

"The Moral High Ground....A Great Place to Emplace Artillery."

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