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Acrylic paints

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  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Rifle, CO. USA
Acrylic paints
Posted by M1GarandFan on Friday, September 22, 2017 2:03 PM

I'm sure that the members here can help me with this:

I'm having a heck of a time getting my acrylic paints to "stick". Working on a figure and every time I handle it, the paint virtually rubs off in my hand. So, how do you prep the plastic to get the paint to stick? Do you use soap and water, alcohol, thinner, gasoline, diesel....C4!?

Thanks in advance for your help!

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Friday, September 22, 2017 2:23 PM

It can be a number things.

Did you clean your parts with warm soap and water?

Did you put a coat of primer on?

Did you let the paint dry completely before handling?

Paint a little at a time and don't rush.

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Rifle, CO. USA
Posted by M1GarandFan on Friday, September 22, 2017 3:49 PM

Uh, I may have missed the soap and water on the figures, damn it! As far as primer goes, I've never used it before. Guess that's something to consider now. The paint dries pretty fast here in 8% humidity, but I usually let it sit over night anyway.

Thanks for tips, 214. I appreciate it.

I still like my enamels the best! 

  • Member since
    December, 2013
  • From: Orlando Florida
Posted by route62 on Friday, September 22, 2017 4:02 PM

Second the primer advise.  With all acrylics i always spray primer first.  I use enamel or laquer primer so there is no chance of interaction with acrylic.

  • Member since
    December, 2012
Posted by Ixion on Friday, September 22, 2017 5:19 PM

To keep from bungling up my figures as I paint them, I drill a .021" hole in one of the figure's heels with a #75 bit and CA glue in a short piece of .020 brass rod. Clamp this in a pin vise for a convenient handle. Makes a good anchor pin to mount your figure to your diorama too.

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Rifle, CO. USA
Posted by M1GarandFan on Friday, September 22, 2017 6:24 PM

'62

Ok, primer it is. I do have white enamel primer. Just not used to using it!

Love your avatar picture. I was up at Beale AFB with the SR's a long time ago.

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Rifle, CO. USA
Posted by M1GarandFan on Friday, September 22, 2017 6:27 PM

Ixion,

I have used a post of some type once or twice and it DID seem to work well. I just can't seem to remember to do it all the time! I have some small rod that would probably work just fine for that. Thanks for the hint.

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Friday, September 22, 2017 6:54 PM

With most acrylic brands, Primer is, if not a necessity, highly advisable. Even if you wash and prep the plastic to clear off everything, many acrylic brands are weak in adhesion and durability even after they dry and cure. Priming with a good primer alleviates the adhesion issue. And this tends to enhance the durability as well.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Rifle, CO. USA
Posted by M1GarandFan on Friday, September 22, 2017 8:11 PM

Stik,

Thanks for the extra info. That makes a lot of sense. Most of my acrylic is either Testors or Vallejo.

Great job on the T-55. It looks really good (for a Soviet)! I'm rereading Red Storm Rising by Clancy right now.

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Friday, September 22, 2017 8:36 PM

Thanks for the kind words on my T-55. Red Storm Rising is my favorite Clancy book ever since I read it 30 years ago.

Yes, those two brands of acrylic paint definitely work better over Primer. MM has poor adhesion, and Vallejo is not too durable in my experience. And from what I have heard and read, Model Master Acrylic Primer is best avoided. I would suggest something with more "teeth" and durability. I like using Mr Surfacer, Tamiya Primer, or Humbrol. Just make sure you give your airbrush a VERY thorough cleaning after using any Primer.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Lacey, WA.
Posted by M. Brindos on Sunday, September 24, 2017 11:48 AM

I'll toss my opinion in the ring as well.

I drill a hole and put my figures on a toothpick. Primer is a must, and I like to use Krylon, Rustoleum, and Tamiya for my figures. It does make the Vallejo acrylics stick like a charm.

I keep small blocks of styrofoam around for sticking the toothpick into so the paints can dry without contacting anything.

- Mike Brindos

Figure Painting Moderator -- Genessis-Models

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Rifle, CO. USA
Posted by M1GarandFan on Sunday, September 24, 2017 12:43 PM

M. Brindos,

Thanks for your input on this also. It's funny; I've got the styrofoam blocks and toothpicks and have used them on road wheels. The idea of using them for figures just never occurred to me! I will definitely use primer from now on and I will also clear flat coat the finished product. I like using Testor's rattle can flat, and have some flat paint (enamel) that didn't dry flat anyway. Thanks again for the response.

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Lacey, WA.
Posted by M. Brindos on Monday, September 25, 2017 6:55 AM

Hey no problem. :)

Sometimes the answer is right under our noses lol.

 

- Mike Brindos

Figure Painting Moderator -- Genessis-Models

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, September 25, 2017 11:22 AM

Ixion

To keep from bungling up my figures as I paint them, I drill a .021" hole in one of the figure's heels with a #75 bit and CA glue in a short piece of .020 brass rod. Clamp this in a pin vise for a convenient handle. Makes a good anchor pin to mount your figure to your diorama too.

 

Lol, or be a cheap sob like me- I do the same thing but use straightened paper clips I steal from the office instead of brass rod. 

I generally always prime figures if for no other reason then I find flesh tones work better over white than the grey or tan most figures come molded in. I've gotten to really like Alclad's white primer here. 

"Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children that dragons can be killed." -G.K. Chesterton

 

  • Member since
    January, 2015
  • From: Lacey, WA.
Posted by M. Brindos on Tuesday, September 26, 2017 8:02 AM

I generally prime with black. Since I keep my paints thin it helps me see how many layers I need to get full coverage. it sometimes helps make shadows as well without a need for a wash. But not always lol.

There really are a lot of different methods to get favorable results.

Ive used paper clips, scrap wire, even cotton swabs for some applications. But toothpicks are easily modified for general uses.

Still need those foam blocks though lol.

- Mike Brindos

Figure Painting Moderator -- Genessis-Models

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