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M60 Tracks

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  • Member since
    August, 2017
M60 Tracks
Posted by laskdjn on Thursday, November 08, 2018 9:14 PM

2 questions.  On an M60, how many track links per side?   Second, with the AFV Club workable track links, it says not to glue, but should you? 

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Valrico, FL
Posted by HeavyArty on Thursday, November 08, 2018 9:32 PM

An actual M60 has about 88 per side.  A model has as many as it takes.  I always glue the "workable" tracks.  I see no need to leave them loose since I don't plan on pushing it around the floor going "vroom, vroom".  

Gino P. Quintiliani - Field Artillery - The KING of BATTLE!!!

Check out my Gallery: http://smg.photobuck...v231/HeavyArty/?

"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." -- George Orwell

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by laskdjn on Thursday, November 08, 2018 9:54 PM

Thanks for the info.  I was considering just gluing one block pin per link so they were still "workable" so I could paint them and put them on at the end

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Sydney, Australia
Posted by Phil_H on Thursday, November 08, 2018 11:22 PM

laskdjn
Thanks for the info.  I was considering just gluing one block pin per link so they were still "workable" so I could paint them and put them on at the end

If you glue them in a flat configuration, that should work for the straight runs, ie. top and bottom, but will be problematic going around the sprockets and idlers. The end connectors will stick out at an unnatural angle instead of being flush against the wheels. Adjust the angle when you wrap around and all will be fine.

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by laskdjn on Saturday, November 10, 2018 2:47 PM

The center connector is molded to the block and already sticks out at an unnatural angle

  • Member since
    June, 2004
  • From: East Stroudsburg, PA
Posted by TigerII on Saturday, November 10, 2018 3:37 PM

I used the AFV Club tracks on both my M60A1's and M1 Abrams. I didn't glue them and they stayed on nicely. It made it easier to paint them and everything is aligned. 

Achtung Panzer! Colonel General Heinz Guderian
  • Member since
    November, 2016
  • From: Baraboo, WI
Posted by Poniatowski on Monday, November 12, 2018 9:37 AM

Remember that on an M60, the track 'sag' was 1/4 of an inch between return rollers (suspension rollers), so unless the crew isn't doing their job, you won't notice sag in 1/35 scale. 

If the center guides look good when the track is 'flat' against the ground, then you shouldn't have a problem as they're hidden by the idler and sprocket. 

 

Ron

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Monday, November 12, 2018 12:22 PM

laskdjn

The center connector is molded to the block and already sticks out at an unnatural angle

 

the only time the center guide would be at the wrong angle is where the surrounding tracks are starting to change direction/angle like around the sprocket or compensating idler wheel. Then they are covered by the sprocket or road wheel.

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Valrico, FL
Posted by HeavyArty on Monday, November 12, 2018 2:59 PM

You would see on the outside that they are at the wrong angle as well.  I gently bend the center guides to the proper angle where they bend at the front and rear and they look just fine.

Gino P. Quintiliani - Field Artillery - The KING of BATTLE!!!

Check out my Gallery: http://smg.photobuck...v231/HeavyArty/?

"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." -- George Orwell

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Dripping Springs, TX, USA
Posted by RBaer on Tuesday, November 13, 2018 9:21 AM

Like's been said, the AFV Club tracks stay together fine without glue. It makes painting easy as they can be installed very late in your build, and once on, they stay on. In my experience, the end connectors tend to align properly around tight bends too.

Apprentice rivet counter.

  • Member since
    November, 2016
  • From: Baraboo, WI
Posted by Poniatowski on Tuesday, November 13, 2018 10:33 AM

Rob Gronovius

 

 
laskdjn

The center connector is molded to the block and already sticks out at an unnatural angle

 

 

 

the only time the center guide would be at the wrong angle is where the surrounding tracks are starting to change direction/angle like around the sprocket or compensating idler wheel. Then they are covered by the sprocket or road wheel.

 

Nice photos!  An A3?  Also, if the center guide is at an odd angle during the flat run of the track (especially on the return run up top), it's a sure indication of a dead shoe. In other words, the rubber around the pin has worn away and there's no spring left in that shoe, which allows the shoe next to it, as well as that shoe's other pin with a good bushing around it, to over-compensate. One reason tankers 'walk the track' and watch every block as often as possible (once a day if conditions permit and at halts for the driver, as he checks hub temperatures and such).  :)

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Tuesday, November 13, 2018 11:32 AM
No, an M88A1
  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by laskdjn on Wednesday, November 14, 2018 2:23 PM

Poniatowski

 

 
Rob Gronovius

 

 
laskdjn

The center connector is molded to the block and already sticks out at an unnatural angle

 

 

 

the only time the center guide would be at the wrong angle is where the surrounding tracks are starting to change direction/angle like around the sprocket or compensating idler wheel. Then they are covered by the sprocket or road wheel.

 

 

 

Nice photos!  An A3?  Also, if the center guide is at an odd angle during the flat run of the track (especially on the return run up top), it's a sure indication of a dead shoe. In other words, the rubber around the pin has worn away and there's no spring left in that shoe, which allows the shoe next to it, as well as that shoe's other pin with a good bushing around it, to over-compensate. One reason tankers 'walk the track' and watch every block as often as possible (once a day if conditions permit and at halts for the driver, as he checks hub temperatures and such).  :)

 

yeah, every during ops check on our AAVs, we did that, also check for water contamination in the hub.

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