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spikes For A M4A2 Sherman hatch

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  • Member since
    August 2019
spikes For A M4A2 Sherman hatch
Posted by johnfromiwo on Sunday, November 10, 2019 12:18 AM

Any Idea What I Can Use In terms Of Making Spikes For The Hatches On A M4A2 USMC Sherman And What Size Should The Spikes be Cause I'm Terrible At Measuring LOL

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Posted by disastermaster on Sunday, November 10, 2019 9:33 AM

Heated stretched sprue will do.

http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL351/12291693/21864322/413446218.jpg  http://cs.finescale.com/fsm/modeling_subjects/f/3/t/134935.aspx?page=11

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  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Sunday, November 10, 2019 9:55 AM

johnfromiwo

Any Idea What I Can Use In terms Of Making Spikes For The Hatches On A M4A2 USMC Sherman And What Size Should The Spikes be Cause I'm Terrible At Measuring LOL

 

IIRC, the spike were nails welded to the hatches. Probably obtained from construction units. If stretching sprue isn’t your thing, you could probably get the thinnest Evergreen Rod styrene to cut to length and glue them in place. 

 

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Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, November 10, 2019 10:44 AM

What are those for?

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  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Sunday, November 10, 2019 11:27 AM

GMorrison

What are those for?

 

stand off. The Japanese infantry anti tank teams would place satchel charges on the hatches, then pry them open after the charge exploded. The Marines improvised cages or spikes as a countermeasure. USMC M4s at Iwo Jima and Okinawa carried various stuff like this on hatches.

 

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Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, November 10, 2019 11:30 AM

Thanks, I wasn't sure as I don't remember seeing this on ETO tanks.

I specify this stuff for the same reason...

https://www.nixalite.com/products/premium-nixalite-bird-spikes

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  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Sunday, November 10, 2019 12:28 PM

The Japanese army had no real hand held anti tank weapons for their infantry. They were reduced to using “lunge mines”, a mine on a pole that the bearer used like a bayonet into the side of the tank, and satchel charges on hatches. In Europe, the Germans had Panzerfausts, Panzerschreks, mines of all sorts, even anti tank rifles, and multiple other AT weapons at their disposal. So no need for the Germans to resort to the desperate swarm tactics adapted by the IJA to stop American armor.

 

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  • From: North Pole, Alaska
Posted by richs26 on Monday, November 11, 2019 11:55 PM

Cut fine copper wire strands to length and glue them to the hatches.  It would be tedious like drilling out the holes for the dive brakes on a 1/48 Monogram SBD.

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Posted by T26E4 on Wednesday, November 13, 2019 9:30 AM

I think using narrow Evergreen rod or copper wire is preferable due to consistency in diameter.

I would make an L-shaped jig our of sheet styrene with the Y-axis (horizontal) arm the length you want the nails.

3" nails would be about 2.2mm

5" nails would be 3.6mm

Then place the rod/wire into the elbow bend of your jig, and cut them at the end of the arm -- this gives you a uniform length of your "nails"


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  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Saturday, November 30, 2019 9:29 PM

SeaBEEs had 16d (3.5") mails by the keg, but the 40d (5") amd 60d (6") spikes weremeant to only be used to need and were in limited quantity.  There was, allegedly, an order to SeaBEEs to prevent "excessive loss" of the spikes, which happened due to Marine use on tanks.

And, it was mostly due to how the spikes were packaged, boxes in wooden crates, rather than like nails, which were in kegs (which held 10 gross or so).  SeaBEEs had a limted number of 8" & 10" spikes for certain construction items.

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