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Miniart 1/35 LAP-7 Soviet Rocket Launcher

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  • Member since
    September 2020
Miniart 1/35 LAP-7 Soviet Rocket Launcher
Posted by robw_uk on Saturday, January 2, 2021 11:23 AM

Ok, so Christmas PRessie time - son had a list of kits I liked and, in his wisdom, chose this one... Started the build and it is up to Miniarts small part, complex, fun quality. Engine went together nicely, chassis made up of a number of parts but seems to be aligned nicely.... Each wheel is made up of 8 parts (7 parts of tyre and a wheel hub) and there are 7 of them to do so that will take a while.... Going with the box scheme of 4BO and brown. Need to work out which components can be painted when and if I will display the engine or not....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

engine just rested in - doesn't seem to be a big unit

 

 

  • Member since
    February 2011
  • From: AZ,USA
Posted by GreySnake on Saturday, January 2, 2021 11:27 AM
That’s a model of something I’ve never seen before. Nice work so far looking forward to seeing more. 

 
  • Member since
    September 2020
Posted by robw_uk on Saturday, January 2, 2021 11:52 AM

GreySnake
That’s a model of something I’ve never seen before. Nice work so far looking forward to seeing more. 
 

yeah I think Miniart based the kit on one picture in a book (and that was a drawing rather than a photo). Don;t seem to be any contemporary photographs of such a vehicle

  • Member since
    September 2020
Posted by robw_uk on Sunday, January 3, 2021 10:23 AM

More work on the chassis... just some smaller parts to add (like 3mm by .5mm rod!!!!) then it can be primed - chassis was all black which makes life easier. Next off will be the 7 wheels (done one)...

 

 

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Sunday, January 3, 2021 11:38 AM

Hello!

Looks like an attempt to make good use of captured "Wurfrahmen" - German rockets.

If there are photos, it might be that they are still top secret - in Russia it can be like this...

There are many cool war machines with no photos of them - cameras weren't all that common, especially on the frontline. A SS veteran from an anti tank unit on the eastern front told me his track was a T-34 chassis with a PAK40 in a box welded from armor plates on top of it. Try to model something like that!

By the way when you look at the chassis (nice work on it!) you can see that it's daddy was a Ford - strong family resemblance, huh?

Good luck with your build and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Sunday, January 3, 2021 6:36 PM

Never seen it either. Very cool though. Nice work on the chassises

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    September 2020
Posted by robw_uk on Monday, January 4, 2021 2:02 AM
thanks both... the truck bed is a GAZ-AA which I believe was a licensed Ford design... MiniArt have about 5 kits using this base so goo re-use on their side
  • Member since
    February 2011
  • From: AZ,USA
Posted by GreySnake on Wednesday, January 6, 2021 7:43 PM
The chassis is looking very nice. 

 
  • Member since
    September 2020
Posted by robw_uk on Saturday, January 9, 2021 3:07 PM

GreySnake
The chassis is looking very nice. 
 

 

some fiddlyy bits but went together with care.... progress... wheels done, chassis done, now on to cab sub assemblies... a lot of this needs to be painted black so aiming to get all that built up first....

 

 

  • Member since
    September 2020
Posted by robw_uk on Tuesday, January 12, 2021 3:31 AM
cab assembly "done" (need to add glass, upper part of windshield, dashboard and build doors. Started on the truck bed (just to get some bigger parts done) - all sits nice & square after a bit of a battle with the front mudguards.... at the moment all cab parts & truck bed are loose for ease of painting - hope to be able to start painting (well doing a black chassis) this weekend
  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Tuesday, January 12, 2021 8:37 AM

She's lookin' good!!! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    February 2011
  • From: AZ,USA
Posted by GreySnake on Wednesday, January 13, 2021 6:16 PM
You are making some good progress.  

 
  • Member since
    September 2020
Posted by robw_uk on Sunday, January 17, 2021 2:16 PM

thanks both... moving forward... some fiddly bits but so far parts go where they are supposed to. Chassis painted black primer then a light coat of dunkelgrau to give it a bit of definition, green in the cab is MiG 4BO... bit of dark tracks for the rust.... this is building up really nicely I must say - may have to look at some of the other AA/AAA kits (some of the anti-air or the refueler for example)

 

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Sunday, January 17, 2021 3:06 PM

Hello Rob!

Great progress here! This GAZ is really a classic!

I was puzzled by this rocket launcher, so I tried to look up the Russian net a little and here's what I found, I hope you'll find it interesting. Source is a book by V.N.Shunkov "Rocket weapons":

M-28 (MTV-280) and M-32 (MTV-320)LAUNCHERS FOR TURBOJET PROJECTILES

At the end of 1941, the command of the Leningrad Front, in preparation for breaking the blockade of Leningrad surrounded by German troops, instructed the engineers of the Leningrad artillery range (LAP) S.M. Serebryakov and M.N. Aleshkov to develop heavy rocket mines of high-explosive and incendiary action. The need for such mines arose due to the fact that, in the presence of a significant number of weapons for the destruction of enemy defensive structures, the Leningrad Front did not have enough ammunition for them. The task posed to the engineers was greatly facilitated by the fact that in mid-March Soviet troops operating in the Volkhov region seized a German ammunition depot in the village of Konduya, which also contained 28 Wurkorper Spr turbojet projectiles. (280 mm high-explosive mine) and 32 Wurkorper M.F1.50 (320 mm incendiary mine). Their design was taken as the basis for the creation of the Soviet turbojet projectiles M-28 (MTV-280) and M-32 (MTV-320). Used on the Leningrad front, the abbreviated name "MTB" (heavy rotating mine) reflects the principle of stabilizing the mine in flight: by rotating around the longitudinal axis due to powder gases flowing from the jet chamber through a nozzle turbine with 26 inclined holes of a complex profile. Both mines had approximately the same design and consisted of a body, a jet chamber with a turbine, an ignition nozzle, a head sleeve, an explosive charge (for the M-32, a flammable liquid), a detonator and a fuse. Both mines were equipped with the same 128 mm diameter turbojet engines. The diameter of the over-caliber part of the M-28 was 280 mm, and the M-32 - 320 mm. By July 1942, military representatives received 460 M-28 mines and 31 M-32 mines from Leningrad enterprises. The former were filled with an explosive "sinal", and the latter with a flammable liquid. Military tests were carried out on July 20, 1942 in combat conditions: 192 heavy M-28 mines (more than 12 tons of explosives and steel) covered two enemy battalions at once: Spanish volunteers from the Blue Division and the Germans who were replacing them at that hour in the fortified area of ​​Staro-Panovo ... The shooting was carried out using launchers of the "frame" type, on which capping boxes with mines (four for each installation) were laid. The launcher consisted of a frame, opener, rack and mounting angles. With the help of the rack, the launcher frame could move in a vertical direction, which made it possible to give it different elevation angles. Traversing the installation was carried out by turning the frame. The capping boxes placed on the frame were wooden frames with the same outer dimensions. The inner dimensions of the boxes corresponded to the caliber of min. These boxes were used both for storing and transporting mines, and for launching them. The same principle was used to create the Soviet M-30 and M-31 rockets. In addition to frame-type launchers, by the beginning of the fall of 1942, a self-propelled six-shot launcher LAP-7 (LAP - Leningrad Artillery Range) was developed in Leningrad. Its artillery unit was mounted on a three-axle GAZ-AA truck. A characteristic feature of the LAP-7 was the transverse arrangement of the capping boxes, similar to that used in the MU-1 pilot plant. LAP-7 made it possible to separately elevate pairs of rocket mines, that is, it was possible to launch three pairs of shells at different elevation angles - to fire one salvo of three different targets. The M-28 and M-32 rocket mines and the installation for their launch did not become widespread, since in June 1942 the Red Army adopted a powerful M-30 mine with almost twice as large (2.8 km instead of 1.5 km) flight range. Nevertheless, 10 thousand mines M-28 and M-32, manufactured in besieged Leningrad, provided significant assistance to the Soviet troops in breaking the blockade of the city.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Now this would explain why this is a relatively obscure piece of equipment - a "one off" by the standards of the Red Army.

Good luck with your build and have a nice day

Paweł

 

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    September 2020
Posted by robw_uk on Sunday, January 17, 2021 3:11 PM

Pawel

Hello Rob!

Great progress here! This GAZ is really a classic!

I was puzzled by this rocket launcher, so I tried to look up the Russian net a little and here's what I found, I hope you'll find it interesting. Source is a book by V.N.Shunkov "Rocket weapons":

M-28 (MTV-280) and M-32 (MTV-320)LAUNCHERS FOR TURBOJET PROJECTILES

At the end of 1941, the command of the Leningrad Front, in preparation for breaking the blockade of Leningrad surrounded by German troops, instructed the engineers of the Leningrad artillery range (LAP) S.M. Serebryakov and M.N. Aleshkov to develop heavy rocket mines of high-explosive and incendiary action. The need for such mines arose due to the fact that, in the presence of a significant number of weapons for the destruction of enemy defensive structures, the Leningrad Front did not have enough ammunition for them. The task posed to the engineers was greatly facilitated by the fact that in mid-March Soviet troops operating in the Volkhov region seized a German ammunition depot in the village of Konduya, which also contained 28 Wurkorper Spr turbojet projectiles. (280 mm high-explosive mine) and 32 Wurkorper M.F1.50 (320 mm incendiary mine). Their design was taken as the basis for the creation of the Soviet turbojet projectiles M-28 (MTV-280) and M-32 (MTV-320). Used on the Leningrad front, the abbreviated name "MTB" (heavy rotating mine) reflects the principle of stabilizing the mine in flight: by rotating around the longitudinal axis due to powder gases flowing from the jet chamber through a nozzle turbine with 26 inclined holes of a complex profile. Both mines had approximately the same design and consisted of a body, a jet chamber with a turbine, an ignition nozzle, a head sleeve, an explosive charge (for the M-32, a flammable liquid), a detonator and a fuse. Both mines were equipped with the same 128 mm diameter turbojet engines. The diameter of the over-caliber part of the M-28 was 280 mm, and the M-32 - 320 mm. By July 1942, military representatives received 460 M-28 mines and 31 M-32 mines from Leningrad enterprises. The former were filled with an explosive "sinal", and the latter with a flammable liquid. Military tests were carried out on July 20, 1942 in combat conditions: 192 heavy M-28 mines (more than 12 tons of explosives and steel) covered two enemy battalions at once: Spanish volunteers from the Blue Division and the Germans who were replacing them at that hour in the fortified area of ​​Staro-Panovo ... The shooting was carried out using launchers of the "frame" type, on which capping boxes with mines (four for each installation) were laid. The launcher consisted of a frame, opener, rack and mounting angles. With the help of the rack, the launcher frame could move in a vertical direction, which made it possible to give it different elevation angles. Traversing the installation was carried out by turning the frame. The capping boxes placed on the frame were wooden frames with the same outer dimensions. The inner dimensions of the boxes corresponded to the caliber of min. These boxes were used both for storing and transporting mines, and for launching them. The same principle was used to create the Soviet M-30 and M-31 rockets. In addition to frame-type launchers, by the beginning of the fall of 1942, a self-propelled six-shot launcher LAP-7 (LAP - Leningrad Artillery Range) was developed in Leningrad. Its artillery unit was mounted on a three-axle GAZ-AA truck. A characteristic feature of the LAP-7 was the transverse arrangement of the capping boxes, similar to that used in the MU-1 pilot plant. LAP-7 made it possible to separately elevate pairs of rocket mines, that is, it was possible to launch three pairs of shells at different elevation angles - to fire one salvo of three different targets. The M-28 and M-32 rocket mines and the installation for their launch did not become widespread, since in June 1942 the Red Army adopted a powerful M-30 mine with almost twice as large (2.8 km instead of 1.5 km) flight range. Nevertheless, 10 thousand mines M-28 and M-32, manufactured in besieged Leningrad, provided significant assistance to the Soviet troops in breaking the blockade of the city.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Now this would explain why this is a relatively obscure piece of equipment - a "one off" by the standards of the Red Army.

Good luck with your build and have a nice day

Paweł

 

 

 

thanks Pawel - yes there seems to be just one drawing and by the looks of it a corresponding photo.. it is an odd one for MiniArt to do but guess it was "yet another GAZ AA variant" so fairly easy to engineer the launcher unit... tempted to try to get more of them (all of them perhaps) in the years to come

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, January 18, 2021 10:35 AM

Well, no worse than seeing models of German paper projects that weren't even built. 

Cool work Rob, looking forward to seeing the rocket pods added in there. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    September 2020
Posted by robw_uk on Monday, January 18, 2021 11:36 AM

Gamera

Well, no worse than seeing models of German paper projects that weren't even built. 

Cool work Rob, looking forward to seeing the rocket pods added in there. 

 

 

very true... at least there is documentary evidence that the rockets were used ... I am going to do a mix of the rockets - 2x 32mm and 4x 28mm, and possibly not paint the crates - personally I think that the Leningrad siege conditions wouldn't really mean they painted the crtes - so some nice wood effects due...

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Monday, January 18, 2021 1:43 PM

Hello!

That's a nice idea, and a realistic assumption. While you're at it, you can also show the cargo bed deck as unpainted (they usually didn't bother, and then the paint would come off fast, anyhow). And for the firing position note that all the sides were put down - to better withstand the rocket blast.

Good luck with your build and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    September 2020
Posted by robw_uk on Tuesday, January 19, 2021 1:29 AM
argh - hadn't noticed BOTH side panels down on the photo... I had already started on the truck bed and followed the instructions with one side up and one side down. Don't think I can correct now
  • Member since
    September 2020
Posted by robw_uk on Tuesday, January 19, 2021 2:38 AM
moving on a-pace with this.Cab on, half the bonnet on, elevating mechanism on, started on the 6 rockets and crates.... I think a couple of weeks and this will be done & dusted.....
  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Tuesday, January 19, 2021 11:30 AM

Looks good!!! 

And I wouldn't worry too much about the bed side. I'm sure the crew forgot to drop it before launching every now and then. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    July 2016
  • From: Malvern, PA
Posted by WillysMB on Tuesday, January 19, 2021 11:51 AM

The GAZ AAs were license built versions of the 1930/31 Ford Model AAs. Henry built his own production plants in Europe, but went the license route in Russia. They were used extensively in two chassis lengths and some with a tag-along rear axle.  GAZ also produced a license built Model A Phaeton.

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